Article

CXCL10 and CCL2 Chemokine Serum Levels in Patients With Hepatitis C Associated With Autoimmune Thyroiditis

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa School of Medicine, Pisa, Italy.
Journal of interferon & cytokine research: the official journal of the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research (Impact Factor: 2). 07/2009; 29(6):345-51. DOI: 10.1089/jir.2008.0090
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To evaluate CXCL10 and CCL2 in patients with hepatitis C virus chronic infection in presence/absence of autoimmune thyroiditis (AT). CXCL10 was significantly higher in: (1) patients with AT than controls without AT (control 1) (P < 0.001; ANOVA); (2) patients with hepatitis C infection than control 1 and patients with AT (P < 0.001); (3) patients with hepatitis C virus chronic infection and AT (HCV+AT) than control 1 and patients with AT (P < 0.001) and hepatitis C (P = 0.004). By defining a high CXCL10 level as a value >218 pg/mL, 2% of control 1, 14% of patients with AT, 68% of patients with hepatitis C infection, 81% of HCV+AT had high CXCL10 (P < 0.0001; chi-square). CCL2 was similar in control 1 and patients with AT. CCL2 was significantly higher in: (1) patients with hepatitis C infection than control 1 (P = 0.04; ANOVA); (2) HCV+AT than patients with AT (P = 0.03) and control 1 (P = 0.02); no difference was observed between HCV with or without AT. Our study demonstrates: (1) higher circulating CXCL10 and CCL2 in patients with hepatitis C virus chronic infection than in controls; (2) higher CXCL10 in HCV+AT than in patients with hepatitis C infection, suggesting a stronger Th1 immune response in these patients.

0 Followers
 · 
7 Reads
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Some HIV/hepatitis C virus co-infected patients beginning ART experience Immune Restoration Disease (IRD) manifested as a rise in serum alanine transaminase. This was investigated in HIV/HCV co-infected individuals (n=50) commencing ART in Jakarta (Indonesia). Samples were collected at weeks 0, 4, 8, 12, 24 and at HCV IRD. Nine patients experienced HCV IRD (incidence=9.2 per 1000 person-weeks). These resolved without changing treatment. Markers of T-cell activation (sCD26, sCD30) and immune recruitment (CXCL10) increased in many HCV IRD cases, so T-cells may mediate HCV IRD. Total anti-HCV antibody (core, NS3, NS4) remained lower in HCV IRD cases, but levels of antibody to core were not lower in HCV IRD cases. Rises in HCV RNA on ART were independent of HCV IRD, but there was a negative correlation between baseline HCV RNA and total anti-HCV antibody. High levels of antibody may protect against HCV IRD, via lower HCV antigen loads.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2011 · Clinical Immunology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), commonly known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases characterized by monocytic infiltration. However, limited data have been reported on MCP-1 in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and the findings are inconclusive and inconsistent. In this study, MCP-1 was measured in the sera from 2,472 T1D patients and 2,654 healthy controls using a Luminex assay. The rs1024611 SNP in the promoter region of MCP-1 was genotyped for a subset of subjects (1764 T1D patients and 1323 controls) using the TaqMan-assay. Subject age, sex or genotypes of MCP-1 rs1024611SNP did not have a major impact on serum MCP-1 levels in either healthy controls or patients. While hemoglobin A1c levels did not have a major influence on serum MCP-1 levels, the mean serum MCP-1 levels are significantly higher in patients with multiple complications (mean = 242 ng/ml) compared to patients without any complications (mean = 201 ng/ml) (p = 3.5×10(-6)). Furthermore, mean serum MCP-1 is higher in controls (mean = 261 ng/ml) than T1D patients (mean = 208 ng/ml) (p<10(-23)). More importantly, the frequency of subjects with extremely high levels (>99(th) percentile of patients or 955 ng/ml) of serum MCP-1 is significantly lower in the T1D group compared to the control group (odds ratio = 0.11, p<10(-33)). MCP-1 may have a dual role in T1D and its complications. While very high levels of serum MCP-1 may be protective against the development of T1D, complications are associated with higher serum MCP-1 levels within the T1D group.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2011 · PLoS ONE
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Until now, no study has evaluated CXCL9 in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) patients in presence/absence of autoimmune thyroiditis (AT). Serum CXCL9 and CXCL10 have been measured in 60 patients with MC (MCo), in 35 patients with MC and AT (MC-AT), in sex and age-matched controls: 60 healthy (Control 1); 35 patients with AT without cryoglobulinemia (Control 2). CXCL9 and CXCL10 were higher in MC-AT patients than Control 2 (P<0.0001) and MCo (P=0.01), in MCo than Control 1 (P<0.0001), and in Control 2 than Control 1 (P<0.001). By defining a high CXCL9 level as a value>2 SD above the mean value of the Control 1 (>122 pg/mL), 5% of Control 1, 34% of Control 2, 91% of MCo, and 97% of MC+AT had high CXCL9 (P<0.0001, chi-square). By simple regression analysis CXCL9 and CXCL10 were related to each other in MCo (r=0.426, P=0.001) and in MC-AT (r=0.375, P=0.001). We first demonstrate high serum levels of CXCL9 in cryoglobulinemic patients, especially with AT. Further, a strong association between serum CXCL9 and CXCL10 has been observed in patients with MC in presence/absence of AT.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · Journal of interferon & cytokine research: the official journal of the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research
Show more