Article

A Convenient Method for Evaluation of the Enantiomeric Ratio of Kinetic Resolutions

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Abstract

A simple method for evaluation of the enantiomeric ratio E of kinetic resolutions by using only the extent of substrate conversion c has been developed and verified experimentally.

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... According to Chen et al. [20] and Lu et al. [21] , for a simple irreversible kinetic resolution, the E-value is shown as follows: ...
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