Article

Green tea consumption and breast cancer risk or recurrence: A meta-analysis

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 677, Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, USA.
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment (Impact Factor: 3.94). 06/2009; 119(2):477-84. DOI: 10.1007/s10549-009-0415-0
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Green tea is a commonly consumed beverage in Asia and has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory and possible anti-carcinogenic properties in laboratory studies. We sought to examine the association between green tea consumption and risk of breast cancer incidence or recurrence, using all available epidemiologic evidence to date. We conducted a systematic search of five databases and performed a meta-analysis of studies of breast cancer risk and recurrence published between 1998 and 2009, encompassing 5,617 cases of breast cancer. Summary relative risks (RR) were calculated using a fixed effects model, and tests of heterogeneity across combined studies were conducted. We identified two studies of breast cancer recurrence and seven studies of breast cancer incidence. Increased green tea consumption (more than three cups a day) was inversely associated with breast cancer recurrence (Pooled RR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.56-0.96). An analysis of case-control studies of breast cancer incidence suggested an inverse association with a pooled RR of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.88) while no association was found among cohort studies of breast cancer incidence. Combining all studies of breast cancer incidence resulted in significant heterogeneity. Available epidemiologic evidence supports the hypothesis that increased green tea consumption may be inversely associated with risk of breast cancer recurrence. The association between green tea consumption and breast cancer incidence remains unclear based on the current evidence.

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    • "Eleven previous meta-analyses have evaluated the association between green tea or black tea intake and the risk of the five selected cancers [12-16,70-75]. Of these earlier meta-analyses, three focused on breast cancer, three on colorectal cancer, three on stomach cancer, one on primary liver cancer, and one on prostate cancer. "
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies to summarize evidence of the association between tea consumption and the risk of breast, colorectal, liver, prostate, and stomach cancer. We searched PubMed and two other databases. Prospective studies that reported risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of cancer risk for >=3 categories of tea consumption were included. We estimated an overall RR with 95% CI for an increase of three cups/day of tea consumption, and, usingrestricted cubic splines, we examined a nonlinear association between tea consumption and cancer risk. Forty-one prospective studies, with a total of 3,027,702 participants and 49,103 cancer cases, were included. From the pooled overall RRs, no inverse association between tea consumption and risk of five major cancers was observed. However, subgroup analysis showed that increase in consumption of three cups of black tea per day was a significant risk factor for breast cancer (RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.05-1.32). Ourresults did not show a protective role of tea in five major cancers. Additional large prospective cohort studies are needed to make a convincing case for associations.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · BMC Cancer
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    • "Observational studies have correlated green tea intake with reduced risk of breast cancer incidence and recurrence (Seely et al., 2005; Sun et al., 2006; Ogunleye et al., 2010). The most abundant and possibly most potent polyphenol in green tea is epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG; Yang et al., 2009). "
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    ABSTRACT: Background Observational and experimental data support a potential breast cancer chemopreventive effect of green tea.Methods We conducted an ancillary study using archived blood/urine from a phase IB randomised, placebo-controlled dose escalation trial of an oral green tea extract, Polyphenon E (Poly E), in breast cancer patients. Using an adaptive trial design, women with stage I–III breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment were randomised to Poly E 400 mg (n = 16), 600 mg (n = 11) and 800 mg (n = 3) twice daily or matching placebo (n = 10) for 6 months. Blood and urine collection occurred at baseline, and at 2, 4 and 6 months. Biological endpoints included growth factor [serum hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)], lipid (serum cholesterol, triglycerides), oxidative damage and inflammatory biomarkers.ResultsFrom July 2007-August 2009, 40 women were enrolled and 34 (26 Poly E, eight placebo) were evaluable for biomarker endpoints. At 2 months, the Poly E group (all dose levels combined) compared to placebo had a significant decrease in mean serum HGF levels (−12.7% versus +6.3%, P = 0.04). This trend persisted at 4 and 6 months but was no longer statistically significant. For the Poly E group, serum VEGF decreased by 11.5% at 2 months (P = 0.02) and 13.9% at 4 months (P = 0.05) but did not differ compared to placebo. At 2 months, there was a trend toward a decrease in serum cholesterol with Poly E (P = 0.08). No significant differences were observed for other biomarkers.Conclusions Our findings suggest potential mechanistic actions of tea polyphenols in growth factor signalling, angiogenesis and lipid metabolism.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
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    • "whereas a minor inverse association was observed from the casecontrol studies (compared to the lowest quantile, the RR for the highest quantile of black tea is 0.91, 95% CI = 0.84- 0.98). Following the meta-analyses by Ogunleye et al. (Ogunleye et al. 2010), results were published from 2 prospective cohort studies (Iwasaki et al. 2010; Dai et al. 2010) on the association of green tea with risk of breast cancer. And since the meta-analysis by Sun et al. (Sun et al. 2006), results were published from 9 prospective cohort studies (Harris et al. 2012; Fagherazzi et al. 2011; "
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    ABSTRACT: Previous meta-analysis indicated conflicting results in case-control versus cohort studies on the association of green tea with breast cancer risk, and conflicting results were also found in case-control versus cohort studies in another meta-analysis on the association of black tea with breast cancer risk. Many studies were published after the previous meta-analysis. Besides, the dose-response relationship of tea consumption with breast cancer risk is unclear. Thus the association of tea consumption with breast cancer risk was assessed incorporating new publications. Summary relative risk (RR) for highest versus lowest level of tea consumption was calculated based on fixed or random effect models. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline model and multivariate random-effect meta-regression. The combined results from 9 studies suggested no significant association between green tea consumption and breast cancer risk (RR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.64-1.04). No significant association was found among cohort studies and case-control studies after sensitivity analysis, respectively. A linear but not significant dose-response association was found between green tea consumption and breast cancer risk. The combined results from 25 studies demonstrated no significant association between black tea consumption and breast cancer risk (RR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.93-1.03), and no significant association was found in subgroup analysis. A linear but not significant dose-response association was found between black tea consumption and breast cancer risk. Based on the current evidence, black tea and green tea might not contribute significantly to breast cancer risk, respectively.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · SpringerPlus
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