Article

Effect of maternal panic disorder on mother-child interaction and relation to child anxiety and child self-efficacy

Department of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, University of Basel, Missionsstrasse 60/62, Basel, Switzerland.
Archives of Women s Mental Health (Impact Factor: 2.16). 05/2009; 12(4):251-9. DOI: 10.1007/s00737-009-0072-7
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To determine whether mothers with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia interacted differently with their children than normal control mothers, 86 mothers and their adolescents (aged between 13 and 23 years) were observed during a structured play situation. Maternal as well as adolescent anxiety status was assessed according to a structured diagnostic interview. Results showed that mothers with panic disorder/agoraphobia showed more verbal control, were more criticizing and less sensitive during mother-child interaction than mothers without current mental disorders. Moreover, more conflicts were observed between mother and child dyadic interactions when the mother suffered from panic disorder. The comparison of parenting behaviors among anxious and non-anxious children did not reveal any significant differences. These findings support an association between parental over-control and rejection and maternal but not child anxiety and suggest that particularly mother anxiety status is an important determinant of parenting behavior. Finally, an association was found between children's perceived self-efficacy, parental control and child anxiety symptoms.

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    • "Maternal behaviour was analysed with a standardized coding system, the ' Assessment of Mother–Child Interaction with the Etch-a-Sketch ' (AMCIES) (Schneider et al. 2009 ; Jaekel et al., in press ; D. Wolke et al. unpublished observations), by two independent experienced raters (psychologists) who were blind to group and family characteristics. Inter-rater reliabilities (intraclass correlation coefficients ; ICCs) ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 for maternal sensitivity, and from 0.74 to 0.86 for verbal control (Jaekel et al., in press). "

    Full-text · Dataset · Jul 2013
    • "Students with high levels of general self-efficacy reported that they could self-regulate their attention better, work harder, monitor their efforts, and get better grades in school (Luszczynska, Gutiérrez-Doña et al., 2005; Luszczynska, Scholz, & Schwarzer, 2005; Usher & Pajares, 2008). Self-efficacious students also had lower levels of procrastination (Tuckman, 1991) and less state anxiety (Endler, Speer, Johnson, & Flett, 2001) and trait anxiety (Schneider et al., 2009). Self-efficacy beliefs also showed a generalization due to a cognitive– behavioral coping skills training to reduce test-anxiety in college students (Smith, 1989). "
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    ABSTRACT: The construct of perceived self-efficacy is the belief that one can perform novel or difficult tasks and attain desired outcomes, as spelled out in the Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1997). This “can do”-cognition reflects a sense of control over one’s environment and an optimistic belief of being able to alter challenging environmental demands by means of one’s own behavior. Hence, it represents a self-confident view of one’s capability to deal with certain stressors in life.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2013
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    • "Maternal behaviour was analysed with a standardized coding system, the ' Assessment of Mother–Child Interaction with the Etch-a-Sketch ' (AMCIES) (Schneider et al. 2009 ; Jaekel et al., in press ; D. Wolke et al. unpublished observations), by two independent experienced raters (psychologists) who were blind to group and family characteristics. Inter-rater reliabilities (intraclass correlation coefficients ; ICCs) ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 for maternal sensitivity, and from 0.74 to 0.86 for verbal control (Jaekel et al., in press). "
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Very preterm children are at particular risk for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) of the inattentive subtype. It is unknown whether the neurodevelopmental pathways to academic underachievement are the same as in the general population. This study investigated whether middle childhood attention or hyperactivity/impulsivity problems are better predictors of very preterm adolescents’ academic achievement. Method. In a geographically defined prospective whole-population sample of very preterm (< 32 weeks gestation) and/or very low birth weight (< 1500g birth weight; VLBW/VP; n = 281) and fullterm control children (n = 286) in South Germany, ADHD subtypes were assessed at 6;3 and 8;5 years using multiple data-sources. Academic achievement was assessed at 13 years of age. Results. Compared to fullterm controls, VLBW/VP children were at higher risk for ADHD inattentive subtype (6;3 years: OR = 2.8, p <.001; 8;5 years: OR = 1.7, p =.020) but not for ADHD hyperactive-impulsive subtype (6;3 years: OR = 1.4, p =.396; 8;5 years: OR = 0.9, p =.820). Childhood attention measures predicted academic achievement in VLBW/VP and also fullterm adolescents, whereas hyperactive/impulsive behavior did not. Conclusions. Attention is an important prerequisite for learning and predicts longterm academic underachievement. As ADHD inattentive subtype and cognitive impairments are frequent in VLBW/VP children, their study may help to identify the neurofunctional pathways from early brain development and dysfunction to attention problems and academic underachievement.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013
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