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Effects of Therapeutic Massage on the Quality of Life Among Patients with Breast Cancer During Treatment

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Abstract

Therapeutic massage has demonstrated positive physical and emotional benefits to offset the effects of treatments associated with breast cancer. The goal of this study was to assess the impact of therapeutic massage on the quality of life of patients undergoing treatment for breast cancer. Using a pre/post intervention assessment design, this prospective, convenience sample pilot study measured anxiety, pain, nausea, sleep quality, and quality of life. Treatment consisted of one 30-minute treatment per week for 3 consecutive weeks. Instruments selected for this study were used in previous massage therapy studies to measure quality of life/health status and have documented validity and reliability. Participants experienced a reduction in several quality of life symptom concerns after only 3 weeks of massage therapy. Respondents' cumulative pre- and post-massage mean for state anxiety, sleep quality, and quality of life/functioning showed significant improvement. Among study participants, there was variability in reported episodes of nausea, vomiting, and retching; although participants reported decreased pain and distress, changes were non-significant. Therapeutic massage shows potential benefits for ameliorating the effects of breast cancer treatment by reducing side affects of chemotherapy and radiation and improving perceived quality of life and overall functioning.
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... It is to be mentioned also the benefits of this widely used method in minimizing the negative effects of chemotherapy in breast cancer patients, so improving their QoL (19). ...
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Background. Many oncologic patients are interesting to find ways to improve their conventional treatment and use massage therapy, alongside other methods of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), in order to relieve cancer - related symptoms. Aim. This paper’s aim is to evaluate the effects of massage in oncologic patients, adults and children. Conclusions. Massage therapy appears to be useful in relieving cancer related symptoms. However, more randomized studies are needed to really underline the benefits and the risks of this therapy, so the health professionals should choose the proper method for each patient.
... [15][16][17][18] Although existing studies often measure general well-being as one of the outcomes (ie, absence of symptoms or negative emotions like depression and anxiety), few studies explicitly explore positive emotions (ie, happiness) as an outcome. [18][19][20][21][22][23][24] One of the major barriers to providing acupuncture in the pediatric oncology setting is the fear of needles. 25 Acupressure has the combined benefits of using pleasurable light touch in lieu of needles while still being able to stimulate acupuncture points. ...
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Purpose: Acupressure and therapeutic touch may be beneficial for symptom management and increasing general well-being for children undergoing cancer treatment. Acupressure has the benefit of stimulating targeted acupuncture points while providing therapeutic touch. We sought to explore the relationship between acupressure and the experience of well-being among children being treated for cancer who received acupressure. Methods: In the Acupressure for Children in Treatment for a Childhood Cancer trial, hospitalized children received acupressure using specified acupressure points for symptom control as well as points for general well-being. Acupressure was delivered by professionals and by caregivers, following training by the professional. Qualitative data were collected through semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of professional acupressure providers (n = 3) and primary caregivers (n = 13), combined with participant observation during the acupressure intervention. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Results: Analysis of provider interview, caregiver interview, and participation observation yielded 3 prominent themes: (1) well-being elicited by acupressure, (2) well-being elicited by touch, and (3) well-being experienced as relational and intersubjective. These themes, taken together, illustrate the intricate ways in which an intervention like acupressure can help alleviate the difficulties of a childhood cancer illness experience by promoting well-being in the child as well as the caregiver. Acupressure brought symptom relief, physical relaxation, and comforting touch to the child, allowing the caregiver to also feel relief and relaxation as caregiver-child experience of well-being are closely intertwined. Conclusions: Data from the 3 sources provided distinct and overlapping insights suggesting the versatile benefits of acupressure in promoting well-being during childhood cancer treatment. Professional acupressure combined with training of caregivers for childhood cancer may be a relational intervention that facilitates the experience of well-being for both the caregiver and the child.
... The effect of psychological distress on the physical functioning and quality of life of cancer patients is often under rated and therefor health care practitioners don't even try to think about the potential advantages of using psychological interventions for managing cancer related pain. 6 In this regard, the psychological interventions are considered more helpful in managing the breast cancer pain along with the medical treatment because evidences demonstrated the effectiveness of the psychological interventions in treatment. 7 Chronic pain is entirely subjective experience and a complex problem. ...
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Objectives & Background: Recent studies have shown that alternative non pharmacological approaches have significant effect on pain management. Hypnosis has also been seen effective in pain management including cancer pain. The current study was conducted to assess the effect of novel hypnotic approach, called ‘circle therapy’ on pain due to breast cancer. Methodology: For this study, 60 females suffering from stage 2 breast cancer, undergoing through chemotherapy, were selected by using purposive sampling technique. An intervention plan for breast cancer patients was developed using a hypnosis technique, the ‘circle therapy’. Subjective pain rating scale was used for the pre and post assessment of the pain.Results: Repeated measure ANOVA showed a significant effect of ‘circle therapy’ on pain caused by breast cancer (p < 0.05).Conclusion: On the basis of this current research, it is concluded that hypnosis has significant effect on pain reduction due to breast cancer. This effect is for short duration; however, this positive effect may be prolonged by increasing the number of hypnotic sessions.
... [46] Psychological stress has a strong impact on accelerating the growth of various types of malignant tumors. [47] It has been suggested that the processes of psychological stress include cancer and treatment as independent factors, and that sociodemographic factors, coping, adaptation, personality factors, medical factors, socio-environmental factors, and life stressors are mediators and/or moderators of the processes. [23,48] It is suggested that these affect both QOL and survival. ...
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Background and aim: Cancer patients and survivors need to cope with many physical and emotional stressors. This cross-sectional study compared the perceived stress, coping, quality of life (QOL), and hopelessness between cancer patients and cancer survivors and examined the relationship of perceived stress with coping, QOL, and hopelessness in cancer patients and cancer survivors. Materials and methods: Using a purposive sampling technique, this study was conducted in the Medical Oncology Department of a multi-specialty tertiary care teaching hospital between February and May 2018. Thirty participants (15 cancer patients and 15 cancer survivors) in the age range of 30-60 years took part in the study. Both groups were assessed by the following instruments: Perceived Stress Scale, Coping Checklist, Quality of Life-Cancer, and Beck Hopelessness Scale. Results: Cancer patients are using maladaptive coping strategies and experiencing psychological distress with reduced QOL than cancer survivors. Furthermore, hopelessness was positively correlated with QOL among cancer survivors. Conclusions: Cancer patients are found to be distressed and hopeless with significant reductions in their QOL.
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Professional massages reduce symptoms experienced by cancer patients, but are costly. A cost-effective way to include this therapy routinely in hospice care is to teach family caregivers to give massages as part of their caregiving activities. However, the burden on caregivers is unknown and might offset patient benefits or cost savings. The pilot study aim was to explore feasibility issues related to licensed massage therapists training caregivers to give massages at home, the burden of giving four daily massages to hospice patients, and feedback about the training and massage delivery. In this pretest/posttest study, caregivers completed the Caregiver Reaction Assessment (CRA), received training on standardized massage techniques from a licensed massage therapist who evaluated their proficiency the following day. Caregivers gave daily massages for 3 days and afterward completed the CRA. Then a researcher interviewed the dyad for feedback about the training and massage delivery. We used paired t tests to evaluate CRA scores and content analysis of interview data. Thirty-nine caregivers (mean age = 46 years, 69% female) completed the study. After training, all but three caregivers provided daily massages. Some caregivers reported minor logistical challenges in massage delivery and documentation, mutual satisfaction, relaxation, and tender moments ranging from laughter and story sharing to closure activities. Mean CRA scores were not significantly different pretest to posttest. We conclude that repeated-dose massages by caregivers to patients dying of cancer is feasible and is worthy of further study to determine the benefits of massage therapy, caregiver and patient experiences, and caregiver burden.
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Pasien kanker payudara yang menjalani kemoterapi dapat mengalami gangguan irama sirkandian berupagangguan siklus tidur dan berakibat terjadinya fatigue. Penelitian ini bertujuan mengetahui efektifitas backmassage terhadap fatigue pada pasien kanker payudara. Penelitian ini menggunakan quasi experimental pretestposttestgroup design, metode pengumpulan sampel secara purposive sampling. Sampel penelitian adalah 42pasien kanker payudara yang menjalani kemoterapi dengan skor fatigue ≤ 30. Pengukuran fatigue menggunakaninstrumen Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI). Hasil uji paired t testmenunjukan bahwa ada perbedaan yang signifikanantara BFI sebelum kemoterapi dengan setelah kemoterapi (p value = 0,000) pada kelompok intervensi.
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مقدمه: تهوع و استفراغ شایعترین عوارض ناشی از شیمیدرمانی میباشند. هدف این مطالعه تعیین تأثیر ماساژ درمانی بر استفراغ بیماران تحت شیمیدرمانی مبتلا به سرطان پستان است. روش بررسی: مطالعه از نوع کارآزمایی بالینی میباشد که در آن تعداد 34 بیمار مبتلا به سرطان پستان تحت شیمیدرمانی با رژیم مورد بررسی قرار گرفتند. همۀ بیماران در طی دورههاي قبلی شیمیدرمانی از استفراغ شاکی بودند. بیماران بطور تصادفی به دو TAC گروه تقسیم شدند: گروه کنترل فقط مراقبتهاي معمول و گروه مداخله که علاوه بر آن سه جلسه ماساژ پشت از نوع استروك و نیدینگ را دریافت کردند. پرسشنامه ها در روز اول فقط جهت بدست آمدن اطلاعات پایه تکمیل شدند. 24 ساعت پس از هر ماساژ، فرم ثبت تعداددفعات استفراغ تکمیل گردید. یافته ها: در پایان مطالعه، اختلاف آماري معنی دار در روزهاي اول( P=0.6)، دوم( p=0.52)، سوم( p=0.84) و چهارم ( p=0.8) بین دوگروه مشاهده نشد. نتیجه گیري: باتوجه به یافتههاي پژوهش، ماساژ باعث کاهش استفراغ میشود اما، این کاهش در حد معنیدار نمیباشد و انجام دادن مطالعات بیشتر در این زمینه توصیه میگردد.
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Objective: This systematic review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of CAM interventions for cancer-related pain in breast cancer patients. Methods: Databases (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and EMBASE) were searched from January 1, 2000, up to April 31, 2019, using the keywords: Complementary and alternative medicine therapies and cancer related pain. Standard tools were used to evaluate the quality of the studies included. Results: Of the 3742 articles found, 46 articles comprising 3685 participants entered the final phase. Our results indicate that interventions including acupuncture/acupressure, tai chi/qi gong, hypnosis, meditation, music therapy, yoga, massage, reflexology, and Reiki improve cancer-related pain in breast cancer patients. However, aromatherapy had no effect on the same. Conclusions: Despite the positive effect of various CAM interventions in reducing cancer-related pain, necessary precautions should be adopted to use them alongside other treatments to control cancer pain in the clinical setting.
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Sleep disturbance and insomnia are prevalent problems for the more than 15 million cancer survivors in the United States. If not addressed, poor-quality sleep can negatively impact physical and psychological recovery from cancer diagnosis and treatment. Cancer survivors are increasingly turning to integrative therapies to improve sleep and optimize their health. The purpose of this article is to review the evidence for the use of nonpharmacological integrative therapies to improve sleep health in cancer patients. Therapies are grouped into the following categories: cognitive-behavioral, meditative (e.g., mindfulness-based interventions, yoga, qigong/tai chi), and body based (e.g., acupuncture, acupressure, massage, reflexology). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, mindfulness-based therapies, qigong/tai chi, and acupuncture have the most evidence for improving sleep and insomnia, whereas yoga, acupressure, massage, and reflexology are still being investigated or building their evidence base. Several areas of strength are identified, gaps in the literature are highlighted, and recommendations for improving future research are provided.
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The massage is the first therapy that every child comes in contact after its born, every mammal after its born. It is the first touch from the mother that mimics and conveys positive energy. Viewed from today's distance, during the study for the effects of the massage as a therapy,when we get the information we formed the mosaic called massage. This publication is dedicated to all supporters of physical therapy and rehabilitation that our experiences can check in their patients, as we have shared with many, around the world. Publication like this one was missing not only in our country, but in general at all. While we were writing this publication we checked ourselves, and now we will share it with everyone who will read it as a professional literature.
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Practical, concise, and well-illustrated, Introduction to Massage Therapy, 3rd Edition provides everything your students need to build strong, foundation skills that will carry them throughout their studies, help them prepare for the national exam, and launch them into successful careers as massage therapists. The book covers the science behind the practice of massage therapy through just the right amount of coverage of anatomy and physiology, pathology, and pharmacology. The Third Edition is enhanced by new evidence-based references and new online videos that demonstrate common procedures, techniques, and flow sequences. The new Third Edition enables you to: • Save time planning and spend more time with your students with Instructor Resources, including: - NEW Homework Activities! • Terminology • Ethics Questions • Matching Exercises - Test Generator Questions - Answers to Chapter Exercises - Critical Thinking Exercises - Lesson Plans - PowerPoint Presentations - Image Bank - Learning Management System Cartridges • Take your students' learning beyond the book with free online resources, including: - New! Videos of procedures and flow sequences including body mechanics, sheet draping, sidelying, seated massage, client supine art, client leg and foot, client prone back, lymph drainage, and reflexology. - New! Animations - New! Coloring Exercises - New! Stedman's Vocabulary and Pronunciation Guide - New! Student Quiz Bank - New! Study Plan - Case Studies.
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High blood pressure is associated with elevated anxiety, stress and stress hormones, hostility, depression and catecholamines. Massage therapy and progressive muscle relaxation were evaluated as treatments for reducing blood pressure and these associated symptoms. Adults who had been diagnosed as hypertensive received ten 30 min massage sessions over five weeks or they were given progressive muscle relaxation instructions (control group). Sitting diastolic blood pressure decreased after the first and last massage therapy sessions and reclining diastolic blood pressure decreased from the first to the last day of the study. Although both groups reported less anxiety, only the massage therapy group reported less depression and hostility and showed decreased urinary and salivary stress hormone levels (cortisol). Massage therapy may be effective in reducing diastolic blood pressure and symptoms associated with hypertension.
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Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disease whose exact cause is unknown. The focus of this study was to examine the effects of massage therapy (MT) on the well-being of patients with CFS. MT was expected to reduce depression, anxiety, and stress hormones, as it has previously been shown to do in other groups of depressed individuals. 20 Ss with CFS (mean age 47 yrs) were randomly assigned either to the massage therapy or an attention control (SHAM TENS) group, 10 to a group. The results suggest greater improvement in self-report measures and biochemical values in those receiving MT vs SHAM TENS. Depression, anxiety, and pain not only decreased immediately after receiving the 1st massage, but continued to decrease over the 5-wk treatment period. MT helped alleviate not only fatigue symptoms but other somatic symptoms associated with CFS. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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Thirty adult fibromyalgia syndrome subjects were randomly assigned to a massage therapy, a transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS), or a transcutaneous electrical stimulation no-current group (Sham TENS) for 30-minute treatment sessions two times per week for 5 weeks. The massage therapy subjects reported lower anxiety and depression, and their cortisol levels were lower immediately after the therapy sessions on the first and last days of the study. The TENS group showed similar changes, but only after therapy on the last day of the study. The massage therapy group improved on the dolorimeter measure of pain. They also reported less pain the last week, less stiffness and fatigue, and fewer nights of difficult sleeping. Thus, massage therapy was the most effective therapy with these fibromyalgia patients. (C) Williams & Wilkins 1996. All Rights Reserved.
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In contrast to the broad experience concerning the therapeutic use of carboplatin, only limited data are available regarding the patterns of carboplatin-induced emesis, one of its most distressing side effects. This study reports frequency, severity and time course of carboplatin- induced vomiting and nausea refractory to 5-HT3 antagonism. A total of 216 patients receiving single-day carboplatin-based chemotherapy regimen were enrolled into an open multicenter study focusing on the safety and efficacy of ondansetron 8 mg t.d.s. Emesis on day 1 occurred in 22% and nausea in 75% of the patients; 44% of patients reported some degree of vomiting within the 5 days observation period. The risk for emesis and nausea over 2-5 days was increased in patients suffering from emesis on day 1 (relative risk 2.25 for vomiting and 2.84 for nausea, respectively). The median cumulative number of emetic episodes was 0 for all patients and 4 for the patients who did vomit at least on 1 day. Vomiting began on average 1.77 days following chemotherapy administration. The mean duration of vomiting was 2 days and 3.1 days for nausea. Carboplatin showed a monophasic prolonged pattern of emesis. The combination with cyclophosphamide led to an earlier onset and a higher frequency of vomiting. The analysis of the pattern of emesis refractory to 5-HT3 receptor blockade should help to describe the course of emesis, which is probably triggered through a 5-HT3 receptor-independent mechanisms. (C) Lippincott-Raven Publishers.
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Background: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) after general anesthesia and surgery may have an incidence as high as 70% irrespective of antiemetic drug therapy. The use of preoperative hypnosis and mental preparation by means of an audio tape was investigated in the prophylaxis of nausea and vomiting before elective breast reduction surgery. Similar interventions have not been found in the literature.Methods: Fifty women were randomized to a control group or a hypnosis group; the latter listened to an audio tape daily 4–6 days prior to surgery. A hypnotic induction was followed by suggestions as to how to relax and experience states incompatible with nausea and vomiting postoperatively (e.g. thirst and hunger). There was a training part on the tape where the patients were asked to rehearse their own model for stress reduction. Premedication and anesthetic procedures were standardized.Results: Patients in the hypnosis group had significantly less vomiting, 39% compared to 68% in the control group, less nausea and less need of analgesics postoperatively.Conclusions: Preoperative relaxation and/or hypnotic techniques in breast surgery contribute to a reduction of both PONV and postoperative analgesic requirements.
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BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of breast irradiation on quality of life, including cosmetic outcome, for patients enrolled in a clinical trial.METHODS Between 1984 and 1989, a randomized trial was conducted in Ontario, Canada, in which women with lymph node negative breast carcinoma who had undergone lumpectomy and axillary lymph node dissection were randomized to either breast irradiation or no further treatment. A modified version of the Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Questionnaire (BCQ) was administered to women at baseline, 1 month (4 weeks), and 2 months (8 weeks) after randomization. Irritation of the skin of the breast, breast pain, and appearance of the breast to the patient were also assessed every 3 months for the first 2 years of the study.RESULTSOf 837 patients, 416 were randomly allocated to radiation therapy and 421 to no further treatment. The mean change in quality of life from baseline to 2 months was −0.05 for the radiation group and +0.30 for the control group. The difference between groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0001). Longer term radiation therapy increased the proportion of patients who were troubled by irritation of the skin of the breast and breast pain. Radiation therapy did not increase the proportion of patients at 2 years who were troubled by the appearance of the treated breast; 4.8% in irradiated and nonirradiated patients (P = 0.62).CONCLUSIONS Breast irradiation therapy had an effect on quality of life during treatment. After treatment, irradiated patients reported increased breast symptoms compared with controls. However, no difference was detected between groups at 2 years in the rates of skin irritation, breast pain, and being upset by the appearance of the breast. Cancer 2000;88:2260–6. © 2000 American Cancer Society.
Article
Background. Nausea and vomiting are the most distressing side effects associated with the administration of chemotherapy for neoplastic diseases. Nausea, in particular, often had been ignored in studies of chemotherapy side effects. Recently, progress has been made in the control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, due, in part, to a better understanding of the physiologic mechanisms involved.Methods. This paper reviews recent advances in the control of emesis, focusing on pharmacologic treatments.Results. The efficacy and safety of the serotonin (5-HT3) receptor antagonists granisetron, ondansetron, and tropisetron in the control of acute and delayed emesis and emesis induced by repeat-cycle chemotherapy are summarized. Although differences in study design and definitions of response criteria have made it difficult to compare the studies that have evaluated these three agents, the overall body of literature supports several clinical findings.Conclusions. (1) The 5HT3 antiemetic agents have been shown to be clinically more effective in the control of nausea and emesis than previously used agents. (2) No one of the three has demonstrated consistently greater efficacy. (3) Efficacy appears to be more pronounced for cisplatin-containing regimens than for moderate or less emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. (4) Effectiveness of the 5HT3 agents appears to be less for delayed nausea and emesis than for acute symptoms. Potential control of anticipatory nausea and emesis has not been investigated. (5) Control over nausea appears to be significantly less than control over emesis. In the studies in which it has been measured, nausea control remains incomplete for approximately half the patients given 5HT3 agents. (6) The efficacy of the agents appears to diminish across repeated days and, perhaps, across repeated chemotherapy cycles. (7) The addition of a steroid such as dexamethasone increases the efficacy of both 5HT3 and other antiemetic agents. This effect also seems to apply to delayed nausea and emesis Cancer 1995;76:343–57.
Article
 The purpose was to measure the effects of postchemotherapy nausea and vomiting (PCNV) on health-related quality of life (HQL) in patients receiving either moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. The study sample consisted of 832 chemotherapy-naive patients with cancer who received either moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy as part of multicenter trials of new antiemetics. The patients completed the self-report European Organization for Research and Cancer (EORTC) core Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) before chemotherapy (baseline) and 1 week (day 8) and 2–4 weeks after chemotherapy. They also completed a self-report nausea and vomiting (NV) diary for 5–7 days after chemotherapy. To determine the effects of PCNV on HQL, the change in scores between the baseline and day 8 HQL assessments was calculated for each domain and symptom in the QLQ-C30 and compared in four subgroups of patients: those with both nausea and vomiting, those with nausea but no vomiting, those with no nausea but with vomiting, and those with neither nausea nor vomiting. The group with both nausea and vomiting showed statistically significantly worse physical, cognitive and social functioning, global quality of life, fatigue, anorexia, insomnia and dyspnea as compared to the group with neither nausea nor vomiting (0.0001<P<0.05). Patients with only nausea but no vomiting tended to have less worsening in functioning and symptoms than those having both nausea and vomiting. Increased severity of vomiting (>2 episodes) was associated with worsening of only global quality of life and anorexia as compared with 1–2 episodes of vomiting (0.0001<P<0.01). By 2–4 weeks after chemotherapy all HQL scores had either returned to their baseline levels or were better than baseline. PCNV adversely affects several quality-of-life domains, but patients with only nausea experience less disruption than do those with both nausea and vomiting. Patients with 1–2 episodes of vomiting experience almost the same degree of disruption of HQL as do patients with more than 2 episodes of vomiting.