Article

Myelin Basic Protein Binds to and Inhibits the Fibrillar Assembly of Aβ42 in Vitro

Department of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-8153, USA.
Biochemistry (Impact Factor: 3.02). 05/2009; 48(22):4720-7. DOI: 10.1021/bi900037s
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The deposition of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) fibrils into plaques within the brain parenchyma and along cerebral blood vessels is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Abeta peptides are produced through the successive cleavage of the Abeta precursor protein by beta- and gamma-secretase, producing peptides between 39 and 43 amino acids in length. The most common of these are Abeta40 (the most abundant) and Abeta42. Abeta42 is more fibrillogenic than Abeta40 and has been implicated in early Abeta plaque deposition. Our previous studies determined that myelin basic protein (MBP) was capable of inhibiting fibril formation of a highly fibrillogenic Abeta peptide containing both E22Q (Dutch) and D23N (Iowa) mutations associated with familial forms of cerebral amyloid angiopathy [Hoos, M. D., et al. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 9952-9961]. In this study, we show through a combination of biochemical and ultrastructural techniques that MBP is also capable of inhibiting the beta-sheet fibrillar assembly of the normal Abeta42 peptide. These findings suggest that MBP may play a role in regulating the deposition of Abeta42 and thereby also may regulate the early formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

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    • "Ser151 was identified as the active serine residue involved in autocatalysis (D’Souza et al., 2005). Hoos et al. (2007, 2009) have shown that MBP binds Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) and inhibits Aβ fibril formation. The progressive accumulation of fibrillar Aβ in senile plaques and in the cerebral vasculature is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. "
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