Integrated Gender-Based Violence and HIV Risk Reduction Intervention for South African Men: Results of a Quasi-Experimental Field Trial

Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA.
Prevention Science (Impact Factor: 3.15). 05/2009; 10(3):260-9. DOI: 10.1007/s11121-009-0129-x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

South Africa is in the midst of one of the world's most devastating HIV/AIDS epidemics and there is a well-documented association between violence against women and HIV transmission. Interventions that target men and integrate HIV prevention with gender-based violence prevention may demonstrate synergistic effects. A quasi-experimental field intervention trial was conducted with two communities randomly assigned to receive either: (a) a five session integrated intervention designed to simultaneously reduce gender-based violence (GBV) and HIV risk behaviors (N = 242) or (b) a single 3-hour alcohol and HIV risk reduction session (N = 233). Men were followed for 1-, 3-, and 6-months post intervention with 90% retention. Results indicated that the GBV/HIV intervention reduced negative attitudes toward women in the short term and reduced violence against women in the longer term. Men in the GBV/HIV intervention also increased their talking with sex partners about condoms and were more likely to have been tested for HIV at the follow-ups. There were few differences between conditions on any HIV transmission risk reduction behavioral outcomes. Further research is needed to examine the potential synergistic effects of alcohol use, gender violence, and HIV prevention interventions.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Leickness Simbayi
  • Source
    • "We created community workshops regarding gender (in addition to the community workshops on stigma reduction) to engage with men and women to challenge traditional ideas of masculinity regarding health. This type of programming has already been shown to increase HIV testing686970 , and has the potential to increase engagement in care [71]. Men and youth need to be able to seek care without raising suspicions that they are HIV-positive. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Stigma is a known barrier to HIV testing and care. Because access to antiretroviral therapy reduces overt illness and mortality, some scholars theorized that HIV-related stigma would decrease as treatment availability increased. However, the association between ART accessibility and stigma has not been as straightforward as originally predicted. Methods We conducted a “situational analysis”—a rapid, community-based qualitative assessment to inform a combination HIV prevention program in high prevalence communities. In the context of this community-based research, we conducted semi-structured interviews and focus groups with 684 individuals in four low-resource sub-districts in North West Province, South Africa. In addition to using this data to inform programming, we examined the impact of stigma on the uptake of services. Results Findings suggested that anticipated stigma remains a barrier to care. Although participants reported less enacted stigma, or hostility toward people living with HIV, they also felt that HIV remains synonymous with promiscuity and infidelity. Participants described community members taking steps to avoid being identified as HIV-positive, including avoiding healthcare facilities entirely, using traditional healers, or paying for private doctors. Such behaviors led to delays in testing and accessing care, and problems adhering to medications, especially for men and youth with no other health condition that could plausibly account for their utilization of medical services. Conclusions We conclude that providing access to ART alone will not end HIV-related stigma. Instead, individuals will remain hesitant to seek care as long as they fear that doing so will lead to prejudice and discrimination. It is critical to combat this trend by increasing cultural acceptance of being seropositive, integrating HIV care into general primary care and normalizing men and youths’ accessing health care.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · BMC Public Health
  • Source
    • "These interventions target all men and usually address the intersections between gender-based violence and HIV risks. While these have proved to be somewhat successful in changing attitudes that contribute to HIV risk and the perpetration of IPV, on the basis of men's reports of their own behaviour (Jewkes et al. 2008; Kalichman et al. 2009), there has been no systematic, independent review of programmes that have specifically targeted men who have encountered the criminal justice system and been identified as perpetrators of IPV. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite a body of work on male perpetrators experiences of intervention programmes, little is known about the intersubjective aspects of the relationships between counsellors and perpetrators. This article explores the intervention context as a social encounter, in which the identities of both parties are implicated, drawing on qualitative interviews with counsellors. We show how social identifica- tions such as age, gender, race and class intersect to produce different possibilities for counsellors and clients, but also how identification involves more than just social similarity. We suggest that a responsive response to counselling male abusers may mean the recognition of the importance of identification across and through social similarity but it may also mean working through psychic identification to overcome difference in the counselling encounter.
    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
  • Source
    • "These interventions target all men and usually address the intersections between gender-based violence and HIV risks. While these have proved to be somewhat successful in changing attitudes that contribute to HIV risk and the perpetration of IPV, on the basis of men's reports of their own behaviour (Jewkes et al. 2008; Kalichman et al. 2009), there has been no systematic, independent review of programmes that have specifically targeted men who have encountered the criminal justice system and been identified as perpetrators of IPV. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite a body of work on male perpetrators experiences of intervention programmes, little is known about the intersubjective aspects of the relationships between counsellors and perpetrators. This article explores the intervention context as a social encounter, in which the identities of both parties are implicated, drawing on qualitative interviews with counsellors. We show how social identifications such as age, gender, race and class intersect to produce different possibilities for counsellors and clients, but also how identification involves more than just social similarity. We suggest that a responsive response to counselling male abusers may mean the recognition of the importance of identification across and through social similarity but it may also mean working through psychic identification to overcome difference in the counselling encounter. Keywords: perpetrator intervention, batterer intervention, intimate partner violence, counselling, abusers
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · British Journal of Criminology
Show more