Article

Effect of duration of exposure to polluted air environment on lung function in subjects exposed to crude oil spill into sea water

Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health (Impact Factor: 0.7). 05/2009; 22(1):35-41. DOI: 10.2478/v10001-009-0007-6
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Oil spill in sea water represents a huge environmental disaster for marine life and humans in the vicinity. The aim was to investigate the effect of duration of exposure to polluted air environment on lung function in subjects exposed to crude oil spill into sea water.
The present study was conducted under the supervision of Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during the period July 2003 - December 2004. This was a comparative study of spirometry in 31 apparently healthy, non smoking, male workers, exposed to crude oil spill environment during the oil cleaning operation. The exposed group was matched with similar number of male, non smoking control subjects. Pulmonary function test was performed by using an electronic spirometer.
Subjects exposed to polluted air for periods longer than 15 days showed a significant reduction in Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in First Second (FEV1), Forced Expiratory Flow in 25-25% (FEF25-75%) and Maximal Voluntary Ventilation (MVV).
Air environment polluted due to crude oil spill into sea water caused impaired lung function and this impairment was associated with dose response effect of duration of exposure to air polluted by crude oil spill into sea water.

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    • "A few epidemiological studies have shown an increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms in residents or clean-up workers immediately after exposure to an oil spill, which may be prolonged after the spill.2-8 The effect of oil spills on lung function has been inconsistent in several clinical studies.2,8-11 There has been only one study in children that showed no deleterious effect of exposure to an oil spill on lung function.9 "
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