Location-Aware Augmented Reality Gaming for Emergency Response Education: Concepts and Development

Article · January 2007with 43 Reads
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Abstract
This paper describes the design and development of a location-aware augmented reality game designed to help fire emergency response students learn embodied team coordination skills. This work incorporates design implications from a fire training school ethnography to develop a game design. It addresses how game design affects the participant experience, and helps teach team coordination skills. Emphasis is placed on the iterative design process, and how emerging ethnographic data has resulted in ongoing evolution of the game design.

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