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3-D Creativity in Organizations: Discipline, Discipline, Discipline

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... Some authors focus on hiring criteria. For instance, hiring individuals who think differently (Sutton 2001) and who are competent (Napier and Usui 2008;Girdauskiene 2013). Some authors also highlight organizational criteria: low formal structure (Catmull 2008;Ensor, Cottam, and Band 2001;Florida and Goodnight 2005;Spelthann and Haunschild 2011) as well as a culture that promotes openness, flexibility and tolerance (Amabile and Khaire 2008;Minahan and H€ artel 2005;Napier and Usui 2008;Pitta, Wood, and Franzak 2008;Wood et al. 2011;Girdauskiene 2013). ...
... For instance, hiring individuals who think differently (Sutton 2001) and who are competent (Napier and Usui 2008;Girdauskiene 2013). Some authors also highlight organizational criteria: low formal structure (Catmull 2008;Ensor, Cottam, and Band 2001;Florida and Goodnight 2005;Spelthann and Haunschild 2011) as well as a culture that promotes openness, flexibility and tolerance (Amabile and Khaire 2008;Minahan and H€ artel 2005;Napier and Usui 2008;Pitta, Wood, and Franzak 2008;Wood et al. 2011;Girdauskiene 2013). While those studies provide an interesting insight into generic factors associated with team management, structure and culture, they do not provide a fine-grained understanding of how management is concretely performed in those organizations. ...
Article
Creative organizations are characterized by a tension between creative work and business. Our research mobilizes Boltanski and Thévenot’s Economies of Worth framework to explore, through the concept of compromise, how this tension is accommodated in the management of creative workers. Based on our study of eleven small advertising agencies, we identify four profiles for the management of creative work: Versatile, Creator, Manager, and Technician. Each of those profiles deals differently with the tension between creative work and business. Drawing on Boltanski and Thévenot’s framework, every profile is analyzed in terms of compromises between orders of worth, that allow the agencies to properly manage the tension. Moreover, instead of seeing management as killing creative work, we show how it can foster it. Our research contributes to the literature by developing a typology for the management of creative work that suggests four viable ways to structure creative work in advertising agencies.
... Some authors also discuss the importance of exposing creative workers to challenges (Amabile & Khaire, 2008;Andriopoulos & Lowe, 2000). Other focus on hiring criteria: hire individuals who think differently (Sutton, 2001) and who are competent (Girdauskiene, 2013;Napier & Usui, 2008). Some authors have also focused on organizational criteria, among them, low formal structure (Catmull, 2008;Ensor et al., 2001;Florida & Goodnight, 2005;Spelthann & Haunschild, 2011) as well as a culture that promotes openness, flexibility and tolerance (Amabile & Khaire, 2008;Girdauskiene, 2013;Minahan & Härtel, 2005;Napier & Usui, 2008;Pitta et al., 2008;Wood et al., 2011). ...
... Other focus on hiring criteria: hire individuals who think differently (Sutton, 2001) and who are competent (Girdauskiene, 2013;Napier & Usui, 2008). Some authors have also focused on organizational criteria, among them, low formal structure (Catmull, 2008;Ensor et al., 2001;Florida & Goodnight, 2005;Spelthann & Haunschild, 2011) as well as a culture that promotes openness, flexibility and tolerance (Amabile & Khaire, 2008;Girdauskiene, 2013;Minahan & Härtel, 2005;Napier & Usui, 2008;Pitta et al., 2008;Wood et al., 2011). These studies are interesting and help to identify factors that enhance creativity in creative organizations, but they don't provide an integrated view of the management of these organizations. ...
Conference Paper
Creative organizations, defined as organizations in creative industries, are characterized by a tension between creation and business. While many authors have noted this tension, it has not been systematically analyzed and theorized. In addition, the literature does not address in a fine-grained manner the question of the management of creative work in creative organizations. This research mobilizes Boltanski and Thévenot (1991)’s theory of justification to explore how through the management of creative work, the tension between creation and business is addressed in creative organizations. Based on the study of 11 small advertising agencies, we identify four profiles for the management of creative work: versatile, creator, manager, and technician. All the studied agencies seem to face the creation and business tension. Drawing on Boltanski and Thévenot (1991)’s framework, every profile is analyzed in terms of compromises between different worlds that allow the agencies to deal with the tension between creation and business. This research contributes to the literature in two ways. First, we develop a typology for the management of creative work that suggests four viable ways of structuring creative work in advertising agencies. Second, we analyze how the tension between creation and business is managed differently in the four types of advertising agencies.
... Some authors also discuss the importance of exposing creative workers to challenges (Amabile & Khaire, 2008;Andriopoulos & Lowe, 2000). Other focus on hiring criteria: hire individuals who think differently (Sutton, 2001) and who are competent (Girdauskiene, 2013;Napier & Usui, 2008). Some authors have also focused on organizational criteria, among them, low formal structure (Catmull, 2008;Ensor et al., 2001;Florida & Goodnight, 2005;Spelthann & Haunschild, 2011) as well as a culture that promotes openness, flexibility and tolerance (Amabile & Khaire, 2008;Girdauskiene, 2013;Minahan & Härtel, 2005;Napier & Usui, 2008;Pitta et al., 2008;Wood et al., 2011). ...
... Other focus on hiring criteria: hire individuals who think differently (Sutton, 2001) and who are competent (Girdauskiene, 2013;Napier & Usui, 2008). Some authors have also focused on organizational criteria, among them, low formal structure (Catmull, 2008;Ensor et al., 2001;Florida & Goodnight, 2005;Spelthann & Haunschild, 2011) as well as a culture that promotes openness, flexibility and tolerance (Amabile & Khaire, 2008;Girdauskiene, 2013;Minahan & Härtel, 2005;Napier & Usui, 2008;Pitta et al., 2008;Wood et al., 2011). These studies are interesting and help to identify factors that enhance creativity in creative organizations, but they don't provide an integrated view of the management of these organizations. ...
Article
Full-text available
Creative organizations, defined as organizations in creative industries, are characterized by a tension between creation and business. While many authors have noted this tension, it has not been systematically analyzed and theorized. In addition, the literature does not address in a fine-grained manner the question of the management of creative work in creative organizations. This research mobilizes Boltanski and Thévenot (1991)’s theory of justification to explore how through the management of creative work, the tension between creation and business is addressed in creative organizations. Based on the study of 11 small advertising agencies, we identify four profiles for the management of creative work: versatile, creator, manager, and technician. All the studied agencies seem to face the creation and business tension. Drawing on Boltanski and Thévenot (1991)’s framework, every profile is analyzed in terms of compromises between different worlds that allow the agencies to deal with the tension between creation and business. This research contributes to the literature in two ways. First, we develop a typology for the management of creative work that suggests four viable ways of structuring creative work in advertising agencies. Second, we analyze how the tension between creation and business is managed differently in the four types of advertising agencies.
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The classical economic problem is the question of allocating scarce resources to unlimited wants. This problem is no different, and is arguably more pronounced when considering the needs in the charity, or social service sector given their nonprofit status. In response to the limitations, the study of community carrying capacity examines ‘the number of organizations that can be supported by resources in a particular environment’ (Paarlberg and Varda, Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 38(4), 597–613, 2009). This chapter will consider the potential of carrying capacity of the agencies serving the visually impaired and how organizational creativity can be leveraged to foster networking to better serve the community.
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In this study, we develop a theoretical conceptualization and an operational definition of structuring of human resource management (HRM) processes and examine how this structuring enables employee creativity at work. Analyzing the data collected from employees and their managers in knowledge-intensive workplace settings, we examine a mediation model that suggests that the relationship between structuring of HRM processes and employee creativity is best explained in terms of the intervening variables of perceived uncertainty, stress, and psychological availability. Results suggest that structuring of HRM processes is negatively associated with perceived uncertainty and stress. These perceptions produce a sense of psychological availability, which in turn enhances employee creativity. This study offers new insights about diagnosing the level of structuring of HRM processes and the ways managers and HR directors facilitate its implementation in their organization. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Creativity research has a long and illustrious history, yet the assumptions on which it is based have not been questioned. Most research assumes that creativity is a unitary construct, hindering a fuller understanding of the phenomenon. The present paper argued against homogeneity through the development of a matrix of four creativity types: responsive, expected, contributory and proactive. Implications include highlighting an imbalance in research, differences in processes and predictors for the various types and a new consideration of methodologies. Reviewed in Harvard Management Update, 6(6), 12.