Article

Pediatric Keratoplasty

Cornea and Refractive Surgery Services, Dr Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
Survey of Ophthalmology (Impact Factor: 3.85). 03/2009; 54(2):245-71. DOI: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2008.12.011
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Penetrating keratoplasty in children is a highly challenging and demanding procedure associated with a high risk of graft failure or failure of amblyopia therapy in clear grafts. Nonetheless, keratoplasty remains the surgery of choice for the management of pediatric corneal stromal opacities or edema. Allograft rejection, graft infection, corneal neovascularization, glaucoma, trauma to the anterior segment, vitreous pathology, and additional surgical interventions, especially those related to glaucoma management, are important risk factors. Successful penetrating keratoplasty in children requires careful preoperative evaluation and selection of patients follow-up by well-motivated parents, an expert corneal transplant surgeon, and a devoted pediatric ophthalmologist.

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    • "The majority of respondents used a Flieringa ring or equivalent for support, especially in aphakic patients, but also with pediatric cases, keratoconus, vitrectomized eyes or triple procedures. In the pediatric eye, the Flieringa ring acts as a useful support due to the increased scleral elasticity and reduced rigidity of the eyes.7 "
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    ABSTRACT: To report on the suturing techniques and aspects of postoperative management in penetrating keratoplasty in the United Kingdom. A postal questionnaire was sent to 137 ophthalmic consultants identified from a Royal College of Ophthalmology database as having a special interest in anterior segment surgery. The questionnaire surveyed surgeon preferences for surgical and suturing technique for penetrating keratoplasty surgery, and the postoperative care of corneal grafts. In all, 68% of questionnaires were completed and returned: 73% of respondents used a Flieringa ring or equivalent, 94% routinely used cardinal sutures, with 50.5% removing them at the end of the procedure. The most common suturing technique for routine penetrating keratoplasty was a single continuous suture (35%). In these cases, a 10/0 nylon suture was used by 89%. Sixty-six percent changed their technique in high-risk cases, 52% used a 3-1-1 knot, and 75% made a distinction between a reef and granny knot, with 76% using a reef. Thirty percent buried the knots within the donor material, and 29% within the host tissue. Twenty-five percent had no routine time for graft suture removal, but 41% removed them between 1 and 2 years post-surgery. After suture removal, 98% used steroids and 88% used topical antibiotics. Thirty-four percent stopped topical steroids before suture removal, with 38% stopping topical steroids more than 3 months prior to suture removal. This survey demonstrates that there is considerable variation in suturing techniques and postoperative care for penetrating keratoplasty. These significant variations in practice need to be considered when interpreting outcomes and research.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2012 · Clinical Ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Glaucoma and corneal disorders are often associated and are of diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic relevance for each other. Glaucoma is already present in approximately 15% of eyes prior to keratoplasty, whereas in addition approximately 15% of cases are diagnosed following corneal transplantation. Corneal opacities, surface irregularities and pachymetric deviations from the norm can have a negative impact on tonometry, perimetry and morphological glaucoma diagnosis. Digital and intracameral tonometry as well as flash VEP to determine the visual potential can be helpful in this setting. Increased intraocular pressure (IOP), long-term application of antiglaucomatous medication or the use of antimetabolites in glaucoma surgery can all induce keratopathy. Therefore, intraocular pressure should be regulated prior to corneal transplantation. Risk factors for the evolution of glaucoma following corneal transplantation are the specific indication and surgical technique (e. g. combined corneal and cataract/vitreoretinal surgery), as well as postoperative steroid application and chamber angle synechiae. Unpreserved glaucoma medication without pro-inflammatory effects should be preferred following keratoplasty. In the long term surgery to control IOP is required in approximately 25% of eyes. The wider use of lamellar techniques for corneal transplantation is likely to reduce the incidence of secondary glaucoma.
    No preview · Article · May 2010 · Der Ophthalmologe
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Glaucoma and corneal disorders are often associated and are of diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic relevance for each other. Glaucoma is already present in approximately 15% of eyes prior to keratoplasty, whereas in addition approximately 15% of cases are diagnosed following corneal transplantation. Corneal opacities, surface irregularities and pachymetric deviations from the norm can have a negative impact on tonometry, perimetry and morphological glaucoma diagnosis. Digital and intracameral tonometry as well as flash VEP to determine the visual potential can be helpful in this setting. Increased intraocular pressure (IOP), long-term application of antiglaucomatous medication or the use of antimetabolites in glaucoma surgery can all induce keratopathy. Therefore, intraocular pressure should be regulated prior to corneal transplantation. Risk factors for the evolution of glaucoma following corneal transplantation are the specific indication and surgical technique (e. g. combined corneal and cataract/vitreoretinal surgery), as well as postoperative steroid application and chamber angle synechiae. Unpreserved glaucoma medication without pro-inflammatory effects should be preferred following keratoplasty. In the long term surgery to control IOP is required in approximately 25% of eyes. The wider use of lamellar techniques for corneal transplantation is likely to reduce the incidence of secondary glaucoma.
    No preview · Article · May 2010 · Der Ophthalmologe
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