Article

Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Depressive Symptomatology, Stress and Coping Strategies among Jordanian University Students

Department of Community Health Nursing, Faculty & Nursing, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan.
Issues in Mental Health Nursing 04/2009; 30(3):188-96. DOI: 10.1080/01612840802694577
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The study examined the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with university students suffering from moderate to severe depressive symptoms in Jordan. Eighty-four university students were recruited and assigned randomly to control and intervention groups. Intervention impact was assessed on measures of depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and coping strategies at three time points; baseline, postintervention, and 3-months postintervention. The interventional model used was the Modified Teaching Kids to Cope (MTKC), and the control group received no treatment. Overall, using CBT showed a significant improvement in the outcome measures. At postintervention, students had lower scores on perceived stress, lower depressive symptoms, less use of avoidance coping strategies, and more use of approach coping strategies. The findings are discussed in terms of treatment implications and recommendations for use at academic and health care settings.

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Available from: Ayman Hamdan Mansour, Mar 15, 2015
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    • "Other possible avenues of inquiry would be research investigating why off-campus students and juniors are the most stressed, depressed, and anxious as well as types of interventions that would be beneficial in relieving depression, anxiety, and stress in college students. From a treatment perspective, many schools, including Franciscan University, already have programs in place (Enright et al., 2000; Hamdan-Mansour et al., 2009; Thompson et al., 2010). It is evident, based on our results and the literature reviewed above, that the prevalence of symptoms as well as clear demographic correlates indicate a need for an increase in the number and scope of such programs addressing depression, anxiety, and stress, as well as the most prevalent concerns of its students. "

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    • "Other possible avenues of inquiry would be research investigating why off-campus students and juniors are the most stressed, depressed, and anxious as well as types of interventions that would be beneficial in relieving depression, anxiety, and stress in college students. From a treatment perspective, many schools, including Franciscan University, already have programs in place (Enright et al., 2000; Hamdan-Mansour et al., 2009; Thompson et al., 2010). It is evident, based on our results and the literature reviewed above, that the prevalence of symptoms as well as clear demographic correlates indicate a need for an increase in the number and scope of such programs addressing depression, anxiety, and stress, as well as the most prevalent concerns of its students. "
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