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Karapanos, E., Martens, J.-B., and Hassenzahl, M. Reconstructing experiences with iScale.
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... These methods usually combine an interview with a sketching task, asking the participants to draw the curve(s) of their experience with a product or service over time [11]. The authors of the UX curve method published guidelines and templates as supplementary material [14] to support the administration of the method. These guidelines, based on the authors' experiences using the method, briefly cover topics such as the use of the templates, the suitable usage period, the instructions given to the interviewee, the drawing session and the analysis of the results. ...
... For instance, the facilitator learned about the process of sketching the curves: Who should draw the curves? In the original instructions [13,14], the users are asked to draw the curve themselves and to annotate the changes by numbering them on the curve. However, none of the participants adopting this approach while being the interviewer was satisfied with the depth of users' curves and annotations. ...
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Studying six months in two hours
  • V Roto
  • S Kujala
Roto, V. and Kujala, S. Studying six months in two hours. In CHI 2012 Workshop on Theories, Methods and Case Studies of Longitudinal HCI Research, (2012).