Article

Combining education and video-based contact to reduce stigma of mental illness: "The Same or Not the Same" anti-stigma program for secondary schools in Hong Kong

New Life Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association, Hong Kong.
Social Science & Medicine (Impact Factor: 2.89). 05/2009; 68(8):1521-6. DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.02.016
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study examined the effects of three versions of school-based stigma reduction programs against mental illness - education, education followed by video-based contact (education-video), and video-based contact followed by education (video-education). The participants, 255 students from three secondary schools in Hong Kong, completed measures of stigmatizing attitudes (Public Stigma Scale), social distance (Social Distance Scale), and knowledge about schizophrenia (Knowledge Test) at pre-test, post-test, and 1-month follow-up. Results suggested that adding video-based contact to education could significantly improve program effectiveness only when video-based contact was presented after but not prior to education. In comparison with the education condition, the education-video condition showed larger improvements in stigmatizing attitudes at post-test, in social distance at both post-test and follow-up, and in knowledge at follow-up. However, such differences were not observed when the education condition was compared with the video-education condition. Implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

0 Followers
 · 
36 Reads
  • Source
    • "In 2009, a study examining the perceptions of Hong Kong students towards people with schizophrenia found that, after an 30 min educational lecture followed by the viewing of a video that dispelled myths surrounding this condition, students showed a significant reduction in stigmatising attitudes at post-test (3.21 to 2.34, p b 0.05) (Chan et al., 2009). This study also showed the student's perceived 'social distance' between themselves and individuals with schizophrenia reduced at both post-test (3.31 to 2.66, p b 0.001) and follow-up test (2.91, p b 0.05), and student knowledge of the condition increased after a follow-up test (22.44 to 25.41, p b 0.05) (Chan et al., 2009). A number of studies have shown that during the course of undergraduate education, a student's capacity for empathy and the extent they stigmatise patients with certain conditions can change and this change can be positive (McKenna et al., 2011) or negative (Chen et al., 2007; Nunes et al., 2011). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the healthcare context empathy is the cognitive ability to understand a patient's perspectives and experiences and to convey that understanding back to the patient. Some medical conditions are frequently stigmatised or otherwise detrimentally stereotyped with patients often describing healthcare practitioners as intolerant, prejudiced and discriminatory. The purpose of this study was to find how a group of paramedic students and nursing/paramedic double-degree students regard these types of patients and to note any changes that may occur as those students continued through their education. The 11-questions, 6-point Likert scale version of the Medical Condition Regard Scale was used in this prospective cross-sectional longitudinal study. This study included paramedic students enrolled in first, second, third and fourth year of an undergraduate paramedic or paramedic/nursing program from Monash University. A total of 554 students participated. Statistically significant differences were found between double-degree and single-degree students (p<0.0001), year of course (p<0.0001) and gender (p=0.02) for patients presenting with substance abuse. Similar results were found for patients with intellectual disability and attempted suicide. No statistically significant results were found for acute mental illness. This study has demonstrated significant differences in empathy between paramedic and nursing/paramedic double-degree students in regard to patients with these complex medical conditions. Paramedic/nursing students generally showed a positive change in empathy towards these complex patients by their third year of study; however, they also showed some alarming drops in empathy between second and third year. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Nurse Education Today
  • Source
    • "In 2009, a study examining the perceptions of Hong Kong students towards people with schizophrenia found that, after an 30 min educational lecture followed by the viewing of a video that dispelled myths surrounding this condition, students showed a significant reduction in stigmatising attitudes at post-test (3.21 to 2.34, p b 0.05) (Chan et al., 2009). This study also showed the student's perceived 'social distance' between themselves and individuals with schizophrenia reduced at both post-test (3.31 to 2.66, p b 0.001) and follow-up test (2.91, p b 0.05), and student knowledge of the condition increased after a follow-up test (22.44 to 25.41, p b 0.05) (Chan et al., 2009). A number of studies have shown that during the course of undergraduate education, a student's capacity for empathy and the extent they stigmatise patients with certain conditions can change and this change can be positive (McKenna et al., 2011) or negative (Chen et al., 2007; Nunes et al., 2011). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Empathetic behaviour is regarded as a positive trait amongst healthcare professionals and has been attributed to increased patient compliance, greater patient satisfaction, and greater diagnostic accuracy and reduced rates of clinical errors. In particular, paramedic students have typically displayed lower rates of empathy when compared to their healthcare counterparts. The objective of this study is to assess both the level of empathy and changes in empathy in undergraduate paramedic students over a 3-year period at a single tertiary institution. A cross sectional study employing a convenience sample of first, second and third year undergraduate paramedic students at Monash University. Student empathy scores where measured with the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Profession Student version (JSE-HPS); a validated, self-reporting questionnaire. 552 students were enrolled in the study. The mean overall JSE-HPS score for the cohort was 108.60 (SD = 12.50). Female students displayed significantly higher empathy scores of 110.27 (SD = 11.62) compared to males at 105.36 (SD = 13.57). There was also a significant difference (p = 0.03) noted between the 2008 JSE-HPS score 106.32 (SD = 14.02), when compared to the 2009 cohort, 110.18 (SD = 12.91). Results from this study suggest that paramedic students display lower empathy than those reported by fellow healthcare students within the literature.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Nurse education in practice
    • "Contact-based education refers to the involvement of people with lived experience of mental illnesses in sharing their personal stories with audiences and conveying positive messages about recovery. Research has been undertaken to provide evidence for the contactbased approach in reducing stigma associated with mental illnesses (Corrigan et al. 2007; Chan et al. 2009; Stuart 2006; Pinfold et al. 2005a; Altindag et al. 2006; Mino et al. 2001; Schulze et al. 2003; Wood and Wahl 2006; Pinfold et al. 2003). These outcome studies adopted different formats for contact (such as direct contact, video contact, or workshops led by people with lived experience) and demonstrated significant improvements in knowledge, attitudes, and behavioural intent. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated eighteen Canadian anti-stigma programs targeting high-school students. The purpose was to identify critical domains and develop a program model of contact-based interventions. Three steps were implemented. The first step involved collecting program information through twenty in-depth interviews with stakeholders and field observations of seven programs. The second step involved constructing critical ingredients into domains for conceptual clarity and component modeling. The third step involved validating the program model by stakeholders review and initial fidelity testing with program outcomes. A program model with an overarching theme "engaging contact reduces stigma" and three underlying constructs (speakers, message, and interaction) were developed. Within each construct three specific domains were identified to explain the concepts. Connection, engagement, and empowerment are critical domains of anti-stigma programs for the youth population. Findings from this study have built on the scientific knowledge about the change theory underpinning youth contact-based intervention.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Community Mental Health Journal
Show more