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Leraren over de inclusie van dove en slechthorende leerlingen

Authors:
  • Hogeschool Inholland, Netherlands, Rotterdam
  • Radboud University, Nijmegen and Leiden University, the Netherlands
  • (a) Radboud University Nijmegen / (b) Royal Dutch Kentalis
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Regular class teachers are increasingly being asked to accommodate children with intellectual and physical disabilities in their regular classrooms. This research in Western Australia considers the personal concerns that regular class and special education teachers entertain regarding inclusive educational practices. It is proposed that an increased understanding of teachers' concerns regarding inclusive practices will provide a substantial base upon which to implement new methodologies for inclusion and improve the likelihood of the effectiveness of such practices.
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On the assumption that the successful implementation of any inclusive policy is largely dependent on educators being positive about it, a great deal of research has sought to examine teachers' attitudes towards the integration and, more recently, the inclusion of children with special educational needs in the mainstream school. This paper reviews this large body of research and, in so doing, explores a host of factors that might impact upon teacher acceptance of the inclusion principle. The analyses showed evidence of positive attitudes, but no evidence of acceptance of a total inclusion or 'zero reject' approach to special educational provision. Teachers' attitudes were found to be strongly influenced by the nature and severity of the disabling condition presented to them (child-related variables) and less by teacher-related variables. Further, educational environment-related variables, such as the availability of physical and human support, were consistently found to be associated with attitudes to inclusion. After a brief discussion of critical methodological issues germane to the research findings, the paper provides directions for future research based on alternative methodologies.
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The role of cognition--and to some extent motivation--in emotion, the ways meaning is generated, unconscious appraising, and the implications of this way of thinking for life-span development are addressed. It is argued that appraisal is a necessary as well as sufficient cause of emotion and that knowledge is necessary but not sufficient. This position is examined in light of what is known about emotions in infants and young children, the effects of drugs on acute emotions and moods, and recent patterns of thought about the brain in emotions. The discussion of how meaning is generated is the core of the article. Automatic processing without awareness is contrasted with deliberate and conscious processing, and the concept of resonance between an animal's needs and what is encountered in the environment is examined. The idea that there is more than one way meaning is achieved strengthens and enriches the case for the role of appraisal in emotion and allows the consideration of what is meant by unconscious and preconscious appraisal and the examination of how they might work.
Deaf pupils' views of inclusion in mainstream schools
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Iantaffi, A., Jarvis, J., & Sinka, I. (2003). Deaf pupils' views of inclusion in mainstream schools. Deafness and Education International, 5(3), 144e156.
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Op zoek naar passend onderwijs. Overzichtsstudie van de samenhang tussen regulier en speciaal (basis)onderwijs. [Looking for suitable education. A review study of the relationship between (primary) mainstream and special education]
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Smeets, E. F. L., & Rispens, J. (2008). Op zoek naar passend onderwijs. Overzichtsstudie van de samenhang tussen regulier en speciaal (basis)onderwijs. [Looking for suitable education. A review study of the relationship between (primary) mainstream and special education]. Nijmegen, The Netherlands: ITS.