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Bothalia 40,1 (2010) 91
hand on the specimen, we are of the opinion that there is
no concrete evidence that this specimen is directly asso-
ciated with Jacquin’s concept of ‘fruticosum’, although
it is apparent from the extensive description, that Jac-
quin did have a specimen at hand. We therefore view
Jacquin’s illustration as a lectotype, thus placing E. fru-
ticosum var. major in synonymy with what is currently
known as Lobostemon argenteus (P.J.Bergius) H.Buek
(Buys 2000).
Lehmann (1818) independently also recognizes a
variety (ß) major, identifying it with Thunberg’s con-
cept of Echium fruticosum L. (Thunberg 1794). The
sheet in the Thunberg herbarium marked E. fruticosum
by Thunberg (UPS-THUNB4098) consists of two differ-
ent specimens. To the right is mounted what is currently
known as Lobostemon fruticosus, to the left, a specimen
corresponding to Lehmann’s var. major. Typi cation of
this illegitimate later homonym, by a specimen in MEL
places it in synonymy with L. montanus H.Buek (Buys
& Nordenstam 2009).
Lobostemon argenteus (P.J.Bergius) H.Buek, in
Linnaea 11: 133 (1837).
Echium fruticosum L. var. (α) major Sims: no. 1772 (1816). Lecto.,
here designated: [icon in] Jacquin, Plantarum rariorum horti caesarei
Schoenbrunnensis descriptiones et icons, plate 34 (1797) non Echium
fruticosum L. var. major Lehm. in Plantae e familia Asperifoliarum
nuciferae: 421 (1818).
Echium fruticosum var. minor
Sims (1816) cites Ker Gawlers The botanical regis-
ter: t. 39 (1815) under Echium fruticosum L. var. minor.
The reference to t. 39 is an error for it represents Ipo-
moea L. and it is t. 36 instead that depicts a Lobostemon.
Sims (1816) also alludes to being aware of a collection
in the Banksian Herbarium made from a plant cultivated
by Philip Miller in 1759 in the Chelsea garden. In BM
there is a sheet with ‘Hort Chels’ in an unidenti ed hand
on the reverse. The sheet has an undated watermark ‘GR’
included in it, a reference to George Rex (King George).
This is likely a reference to George III who was on the
throne from 1760–1820. The paper was presumably pro-
duced during that period which puts the specimen in the
right time frame, but the specimen is not considered to
be original material due to the absence of unswerving
evidence that it is directly associated with Sims’ concept
of E. fruticosum var. minor. In the light of Sims’ origi-
nal material consisting of a specimen and the illustration,
we view The botanical register plate as lectotype. This
typi cation places E. fruticosum var. minor in synonymy
with what is currently known as Lobostemon fruticosus
(Buys 2000).
Lobostemon fruticosus (L.) H.Buek, in Linnaea
11: 134 (1837).
Echium fruticosum L. var. (β) minor Sims : t. 1772 (1816). Lecto.,
here designated: [icon in] Ker Gawler, The botanical register: t. 39
(1815).
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
We thank the curators of the herbaria at the Natural
History Museum, Vienna (W) and The Natural History
Museum, London (BM) for allowing access to the men-
tioned specimens. Thanks in particular to Anton Iger-
sheim (W) and John Hunnex (BM) for assistance. Our
appreciation also to Dick Brummitt for commenting on
an earlier draft.
REFERENCES
BUEK, H. 1837. Echia Capensia. Linnaea 11: 129–149.
BUYS, M.H. 2000. Lobostemon. In P. Goldblatt & J.C. Manning, Cape
plants. A conspectus of the Cape ora of South Africa. Strelitzia
9: 375–377. National Botanical Institute, Cape Town and Mis-
souri Botanical Garden, St. Louis.
BUYS, M.H. & NORDENSTAM, B. 2007. Lectotypi cation of the
basionym, Echium glaucophyllum. Bothalia 37: 25, 26.
BUYS, M.H. & NORDENSTAM, B. 2009. Nomenclature and typi -
cation of J.G.C. Lehmann and H. Buek names in Lobostemon
(Boraginaceae). Taxon 58: 627–637.
D’ARCY, W.G. 1970. Jacquin names, some notes on their typi cation.
Taxon 19: 554–560.
GARSIDE, S. 1942. Baron Jacquin and the Schönbrunn gardens. Jour-
nal of South African Botany 8: 201–224.
GUNN, M. & CODD, L.E. 1981. Botanical exploration of southern
Africa. Balkema, Cape Town.
JACQUIN, N.J. VON. 1797. Plantarum rariorum horti caesarei Sch-
oenbrunnensis descriptiones et icones, vol. 1. Wappler, Vienna.
KER GAWLER, J.B. 1815. Echium fruticosum. In S.T. Edwards, The
botanical register, vol. 1: t. 36. Ridgeway, London.
LEHMANN, J.G.C. 1818. Echium. Plantae e familia Asperifoliarum
nuciferae. Pars I & II.: 398–475. Dümmler, Berlin.
LINNAEUS, C. 1753. Species plantarum. Salvius, Stockholm.
NEILREICH, A. 1855. Geschichte der Botanik in Nieder-Oesterreich.
Verhandlungen des zoologisch-botanischen Vereins in Wien 5:
23–76.
SIMS, J. 1816. Echium fruticosum (ß.) minor. Lesser shrubby Viper’s-
Bugloss. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine: t. 1772. Sherwood, Neely
& Jones, London.
THUNBERG, C.P. 1794. Prodromus plantarum capensium. Edman,
Uppsala.
M.H. BUYS* and B. NORDENSTAM**
* Compton Herbarium, South African National Biodiversity Institute,
Kirstenbosch, Private Bag X7, 7735 Claremont and Department of
Botany & Zoology, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, 7602
Matieland, Stellenbosch. Email: m.buys@sanbi.org.za.
** Department of Phanerogamic Botany, Swedish Museum of Natural
History, P.O. Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden.
MS. received: 2009-09-04.
ASPHODELACEAE: ALOOIDEAE
REINSTATEMENT OF ALOE SPECTABILIS
Aloe spectabilis Reynolds (1937) was described from
material that was collected from KwaZulu-Natal, the
eastern-most province of South Africa. Previously, mate-
rial of this species was erroneously considered to repre-
sent a form of A. ferox Mill. (Berger 1908: 310, 311), a
predominantly southern and eastern Cape species (see
Van Wyk & Smith 2003: 56 for a distribution map of A.
ferox). Aloe spectabilis, in contrast, has its present-day
centre of distribution around Bushman’s River Valley
near Weenen, along the Mooi River near Muden and
h
and on the specimen, we are of the opinion that there is
n
o concrete evidence that this specimen is directly asso-
ciated with Jacquin’s concept of ‘
fruticosum’
,
although
i
t is apparent from the extensive description, that Jac-
quin did have a specimen at hand. We therefore view
J
acquin’s illustration as a lectotype, thus placing
. fru
ticosum
v
ar
.
majo
r
in synonymy with what is currently
r
k
n
ow
n a
s
Lobostemon argenteus (P.J.Bergius) H.Buek
(Buys 2000)
.
Lehmann (1818) independently also recognizes a
v
ariety (ß) major
,
identifying it with Thunberg’s con-
c
ept o
f
E
chium fruticosum L. (Thunberg 1794). The
s
heet in the Thunberg herbarium marked
E.
f
ruticosum
by Thunberg (
U
P
S
-TH
UN
B4098
)
consists of two differ-
ent specimens. To the right is mounted what is currently
k
n
ow
n a
s
Lobostemon fruticosus
,
to the left, a specimen
c
orresponding to Lehmann’s var. major
.
Typi cation of
t
his illegitimate later homonym, by a specimen in MEL
places it in synonymy with L
.
montanus
H.Buek (Buys
&
Nordenstam 2009
).
L
obostemon argenteu
s
(P.J.Bergius) H.Bue
k
,
in
Linnaea 11: 133
(
1837
).
E
chium fruticosum L
.
v
a
r
.
(
α
)
major
Sims: no. 1772 (1816). Lecto.,
r
h
ere designated: [icon in] Jacquin, P
lanta
r
um
r
a
r
io
r
um
ho
r
ti
caesa
r
ei
S
choenbrunnensis descriptiones et icons
,
plate 34 (1797) non
Echium
f
ruticosum L
.
v
ar
.
major
Lehm. in
r
Plantae e familia Asperifoliarum
n
ucifera
e
:
421
(
1818
).
E
chium fruticosum
v
a
r
.
mino
r
Sims
(
1816
)
cites Ker Gawlers T
he
b
otanical regis
-
te
r
:
t. 39
(
1815
)
unde
r
E
chium fruticosum L
.
v
ar
.
mino
r
.
The reference to t. 39 is an error for it represents Ipo
-
moea
L. and it is t. 36 instead that depicts a L
obostemon
.
Sims (1816) also alludes to being aware of a collection
i
n the Banksian Herbarium made from a plant cultivated
by Philip Miller in 1759 in the Chelsea garden. In BM
t
here is a sheet with ‘Hort
C
hels’ in an unidenti ed hand
o
n the reverse. The sheet has an undated watermark ‘
G
R’
i
ncluded in it, a reference to George Rex (Kin
g
George).
This is likely a reference to George III who was on the
t
hrone from 1760–1820. The paper was presumably pro-
duced during that period which puts the specimen in the
r
ight time frame, but the specimen is not considered to
be original material due to the absence of unswerving
evidence that it is directly associated with Sims’ concept
of
E
. fruticosum
v
ar
.
mino
r
.
In the light of Sims’ origi-
n
al material consisting of a specimen and the illustration,
we
v
i
ew
The
botanical register
plate as lectotype. This
r
t
ypi cation places
E
. fruticosum
v
ar
.
minor
in synonymy
r
with what is currently known as Lobostemon fruticosus
(Buys 2000)
.
Lobos
t
e
m
o
n fr
u
ti
cosus
(
L.
)
H.Buek,
i
n Linna
e
a
11: 134
(
1837
).
E
chium fruticosum L
.
v
a
r
.
(β)
minor
Sims : t. 1772 (1816). Lecto.,
r
h
ere designated: [icon in] Ker Gawler,
The
b
otanical register
:
t. 39
(
1815
).
AC
KN
OW
LED
G
EMENT
S
W
e thank the curators of the herbaria at the Natural
History Museum, Vienna (W) and The Natural History
Museum, London (BM) for allowing access to the men-
t
ioned specimens. Thanks in particular to Anton Iger-
s
heim
(
W
)
and John Hunnex
(
BM
)
for assistance. Ou
r
appreciation also to Dick Brummitt for commenting on
an
e
arli
e
r
d
raft
.
REFEREN
C
E
S
B
UEK, H. 1837. Echia Capensia. L
innaea
11: 129–149
.
B
UYS
,
M.H. 2000. L
obostemon
.
In P. Goldblatt & J.C. Manning, Cape
plants. A conspectus of the Cape ora of South Africa.
S
trelitzia
9
: 375–377. National Botanical Institute, Cape Town and Mis-
s
ouri Botanical Garden
,
St. Louis
.
B
UYS, M.H. & NORDENSTAM, B. 2007. Lectotypi cation of the
basionym,
E
chium glaucophyllum
.
B
othalia
37: 25
,
26
.
B
UYS, M.H. & NORDENSTAM, B. 2009. Nomenclature and typi -
c
ation of
J
.
G
.
C
. Lehmann and H. Buek names in L
obostemon
(Boraginaceae)
.
T
axon
58: 627–637
.
D’ARCY, W.G. 1970. Jacquin names, some notes on their typi cation
.
Taxon
19: 554–560
.
GARSIDE, S. 1942. Baron Jacquin and the Schönbrunn gardens
.
J
our
-
n
al of South African Botan
y
8
:
201–224
.
GUNN
,
M. & CODD
,
L.E. 1981
.
Botanical exploration of southern
Africa
.
Balkema, Cape Town
.
J
AC
Q
UIN, N.J. VON. 1797
.
Plantarum rariorum horti caesarei
S
ch
-
oenbrunnensis descriptiones et icones
,
vol. 1. Wappler, Vienna
.
KER GAWLER
,
J.B. 1815.
E
chium fruticosum
.
In S.T. Edwards
,
The
b
otanical register
,
vol. 1: t. 36. Ridgeway, London
.
LEHMANN
,
J.G.C. 1818.
Echium
.
Plantae e familia Asperifoliarum
n
uciferae. Pars I & II.
:
398–475. Dümmler
,
Berlin
.
LINNAEUS
,
C. 1753
.
Species plantarum. Salvius
,
Stockholm
.
NEILREICH
,
A. 1855. Geschichte der Botanik in Nieder-Oesterreich
.
Verhandlungen des zoologisch-botanischen Vereins in Wien 5
:
23–76
.
SIMS
,
J. 1816.
E
chium fruticosum
(
ß.
)
mino
r
.
Lesser shrubby Viper’s-
B
ugloss
.
Curtis’s Botanical Magazin
e
:
t. 1772. Sherwood, Neely
&
Jones
,
London
.
THUNBERG
,
C.P. 1794
.
Prodromus plantarum capensium
.
Edman
,
U
ppsala
.
M.H. B
U
Y
S
* and B. N
O
RDEN
S
TAM*
*
*
Compton Herbarium, South African National Biodiversity Institute,
Kirstenbosch, Private Bag X7, 7735 Claremont and Department of
B
otany & Zoology, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, 7602
Matieland, Stellenbosch. Email: m.buys@sanbi.org.za
.
**
Department of Phanerogamic Botany, Swedish Museum of Natural
History, P.O. Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden
.
M
S
. received: 2009-09-04
.
92 Bothalia 40,1 (2010)
Keats Drift, and in the Tugela [Thukela] River Valley
between Mpofana and Pomeroy on the Greytown–Dun-
dee Road in KwaZulu-Natal (Figure 31).
Further north in Zululand this species seems to grade
into Aloe marlothii A.Berger, which is its closest relative.
However, A. marlothii is typically an element of south-
ern Africa’s northcentral and northeastern savannas, with
subsp. marlothii widely distributed in KwaZulu-Natal,
western Swaziland, Mpumalanga, Limpopo, Gauteng,
North-West and the eastern border of Botswana, while
A. marlothii subsp. orientalis Glen & D.S.Hardy has a
more easterly distribution in northern KwaZulu-Natal,
Swaziland and into Mozambique (Glen & Hardy 2000)
(Figure 32).
Overall, plants of Aloe marlothii tend to be more
robust than A. spectabilis in general appearance. Aloe
spectabilis is a single-stemmed, tree-like aloe up to
5 m high (Figure 33). It is distinguished by its tall,
unbranched stem and much-branched in orescences
with very dark brown to almost black peduncles and
between 10 and 14, erect to slightly spreading, rather
truncate racemes. Furthermore, it differs from A. mar-
lothii in having almost erect racemes that are shorter and
broader, with owers more evenly distributed around
the axis. The apices of the inner perianth segments are a
dull to deep glossy black and the exserted portion of the
laments is orange in A. spectabilis, whereas both are
a light to deep purple in A. marlothii (Reynolds 1937,
1950; Jeppe 1969; Bornman & Hardy 1972) (Table 4).
Given super cial similarities between Aloe spectabi-
lis and A. marlothii, some previous authors considered
the two species to be conspeci c (Glen & Hardy 2000;
Van Wyk & Smith 2003). Others have more recently
suggested that A. spectabilis represents a good species
(Smith & Van Wyk 2008), and warrants reinstatement.
This is done here.
Aloe spectabilis Reynolds in Journal of South Afri-
can Botany 3: 129 (1937). Type: South Africa, [Kwa-
Zulu-Natal], 2830 (Dundee): Tugela [Thukela] Valley,
between Greytown and Helpmekaar, (–CB), Reynolds
2033 (PRE!, holo.; BOL, iso.).
A. ferox auct., sensu A.Berger, non Mill.: 310 (1908).
FIGURE 31.––Distribution of Aloe spectabilis, based on specimens at
PRE.
FIGURE 32.––Distribution of Aloe marlothii subsp. marlothii, ; and
A. marlothii subsp. orientalis, , adapted from Glen & Hardy
(2000).
FIGURE 33.––Aloe spectabilis in the Tugela [Thukela] River Valley.
Photograph: G.F. Smith.
Bothalia 40,1 (2010) 93
A. ferox auct., sensu A.Berger, non Mill. var. xanthostachys
A.Berger: 310 (1908). Type: South Africa, [KwaZulu-Natal], Lady-
smith, Marloth 4157 (B).
Specimens examined
KWAZULU-NATAL.––2729 (Volksrust): valley at Igogo, ± 32
km from Newcastle, (–DB), 1970-07-22, Floquet PRE38541 (PRE).
2829 (Harrismith): Weenen Dist., Blaauwkrantz Valley near Weenen,
(–DD), 1944-08-11, Acocks 10526 (PRE). 2830 (Dundee): Meduna,
(–AC), 1915-07-16, Keeling 110 (PRE); Dundee Dist., Biggarsberg,
near Waschbank, (–AC), 1935-06-02, Reynolds 1394 (PRE); Weenen
Dist., in Muden Valley, ± 18 miles [± 11.2 km] NW of Greytown,
Mooi River Valley, (–CD), 1936-07-28, Reynolds 2031 (PRE); Krans-
kop Dist., Inadi River Valley leading into Tugela River Valley, (–DA),
1943-05-12, Dyer 4383 (PRE); Estcourt Dist., near Keat’s Drift in the
Mooi River Valley, (–DC), 1936-07-28, Reynolds 2034 (PRE). 2930
(Pietermaritzburg): Lion’s River Dist., Zwartkop Location, (–CB),
1964-09-30, Moll 1125 (PRE); Ndwedwe Dist., 3 miles [± 1.9 km] W
of Ndwedwe, (–DB), 1966-07-13, Moll 3287A (PRE).
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The authors would like to thank Ms Hester Steyn,
National Herbarium, South African National Biodiver-
sity Institute, Pretoria, for producing the distribution
map; and an anonymous referee for suggesting improve-
ments to the manuscript.
REFERENCES
BERGER, A. 1908. Liliaceae–Asphodeloideae–Aloineae. In A. Engler
& K. Prantl, Das P anzenreich IV, 38, III, II (Heft 33): 1–347.
Engelmann, Leipzig.
BORNMAN, H. & HARDY, D.S. 1972. Aloes of the South African veld.
Voortrekkerspers, Johannesburg.
GLEN, H.F. & HARDY, D.S. 2000. Aloaceae (First part): Aloe. In G.
Germishuizen, Flora of southern Africa, vol. 5, part 1, fascicle 1:
1–159. National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.
JEPPE, B. 1969. South African aloes. Purnell, Cape Town.
REYNOLDS, G.W. 1937. Notes on Aloe ferox Mill. and A. supralaevis
Haw., with a new name for a Natal aloe. Journal of South African
Botany 3: 123–132.
REYNOLDS, G.W. 1950. The aloes of South Africa. The Aloes Book
Fund, Johannesburg.
SMITH, G. F. & VAN WYK, A.E. (Braam). 2008. Aloes in southern
Africa. Struik, Cape Town.
VAN WYK, B-E. & SMITH, G.[F.] 2003. Guide to the aloes of South
Africa, edn 2. Briza Publications, Pretoria.
R.R. KLOPPER* and G.F. SMITH*
+
* Biosystematics Research and Biodiversity Collections Division,
South African National Biodiversity Institute, Private Bag X101, 0001
Pretoria. E-mail: r.klopper@sanbi.org.za; g.smith@sanbi.org.za.
+
Acocks Chair, H.G.W.J. Schweickerdt Herbarium, Department of
Botany, University of Pretoria, 0002 Pretoria.
MS. received: 2009-08-27.
TABLE 4.—Differences between Aloe spectabilis and A. marlothii
Character
A. spectabilis A. marlothii
Raceme
orientation suberect oblique to horizontal
dimensions ± 250 90–100 mm 300–500 50–60 mm
number 10 to 14 20 to 30
Peduncle colour dark brown to almost black green to reddish brown
Flower disposition evenly distributed around axis secund
Apex of inner perianth segments dull to deep glossy black light to deep purple
Exerted portion of laments orange light to deep purple
To facilitate the identi cation of species of Aloe L.
(Asphodelaceae: Alooideae), formal infrageneric group-
ings, mostly based on growth form, have been proposed
for the genus (Berger 1908; Reynolds 1950). Two of
these, Aloe sect. Graminialoe Reynolds and A. sect. Lep-
toaloe A.Berger, include the grass-like aloes (Van Wyk
& Smith 2004; Craib 2005). The former consists of spe-
cies that are truly very small in stature with their leaves
closely resembling blades of grass, whereas the latter
includes plants that are considerably more robust, with
leaves that are much broader and atter.
The appropriate Afrikaans common names, slank-
or skraalaalwyne (English: slender aloes) are widely
applied to leptoaloe species, as opposed to grasaalwyne
(English: grass aloes) which is reserved for the true grass
aloes (Laubscher 1973). Although it has been proposed
that these two groups should be combined under the old-
est name, A. sect. Leptoaloe (Glen & Hardy 2000) to
include all the grass-like aloes, keeping them separate
considerably assists with conceptualizing the gross mor-
phology of their constituent species. Only a few of the
species of Aloe described from Africa after 2000 belong
to the graminoid and leptoaloid groups [see for example
Smith (2003) on A. craibii Gideon F.Sm. and Van Jaars-
veld & Van Wyk (2006) on A. chalissii Van Jaarsv. &
A.E.van Wyk]; their comparatively small stature make
them dif cult to locate in their often grassy habitats
(Smith 2005). Grass aloes and leptoaloes are absent from
the Arabian Peninsula, the Mascarene Islands off the east
coast of Africa, and Madagascar.
The species described here, Aloe neilcrouchii Klopper
& Gideon F.Sm., belongs to A. sect. Leptoaloe and rep-
resents the largest and most robust species known in this
group.
ASPHODELACEAE: ALOOIDEAE
ALOE NEILCROUCHII, A NEW ROBUST LEPTALOE FROM KWAZULU-NATAL, SOUTH AFRICA
To facilitate the identi cation of species of A
loe
L
.
(Asphodelaceae: Alooideae), formal infrageneric group-
i
ngs, mostly based on growth form, have been proposed
for the genus (Berger 1908; Reynolds 1950). Two of
t
hese
,
A
loe
sec
t
.
G
raminialo
e
Reynolds and
A
.
sec
t
.
Lep
-
toaloe
A.Berger, include the grass-like aloes (Van Wyk
&
Smith 2004; Craib 2005). The former consists of spe-
c
ies that are truly very small in stature with their leaves
c
losely resembling blades of grass, whereas the latte
r
i
ncludes plants that are considerably more robust, with
le
a
ves
that ar
e
m
uc
h
b
r
o
a
de
r an
d
att
e
r
.
The appropriate Afrikaans common names,
slank
-
k
or
s
kraalaalwyn
e
(English: slender aloes) are widely
applied to leptoaloe species, as opposed to grasaalwyn
e
(English: grass aloes) which is reserved for the true grass
aloes (Laubscher 1973). Although it has been proposed
t
hat these two groups should be combined under the old-
est name
,
A
.
sec
t
.
Leptoalo
e
(Glen & Hardy 2000) to
i
nclude all the grass-like aloes, keeping them separate
c
onsiderably assists with conceptualizing the gross mor-
phology of their constituent species. Only a few of the
s
pecies of A
loe
described from Africa after 2000 belong
t
o the graminoid and leptoaloid groups [see for example
Smith
(
2003
)
on A
.
c
r
aibii
G
ideon F.
S
m. and
V
an
J
aars-
v
eld & Van Wyk (2006) on A
.
chalissii
V
an
J
aarsv.
&
A
.E.van Wyk]; their comparatively small stature make
t
hem dif cult to locate in their often grassy habitats
(Smith 2005). Grass aloes and leptoaloes are absent from
t
he Arabian Peninsula
,
the Mascarene Islands off the east
c
oast of Africa, and Madagascar
.
The species described here, A
loe
neilc
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ALOE NEILCROUCHII
, A NEW ROBUST LEPTALOE FROM KWAZULU-NATAL, SOUTH AFRICA
I
I
... The work of Reynolds (1950) on Aloe L. in South Africa has proven remarkably robust; the circumscriptions for taxa he recognised have predominantly stood the test of time. Despite the subsequent synonymising of several well-known species and subordinate taxa (by inter alia, Glen & Hardy, 2000), most of these have recently been reinstated (see for example Smith et al., 2012 on summer-flowering maculate aloes, and Klopper & Smith, 2010 on Aloe spectabilis Reynolds). ...
... However, within this southern KwaZulu-Natal region white perianth apices are always evident, an observation also noted by Viljoen et al. (1996). Where the distribution ranges of related Aloe species meet, such intergradations are not uncommon, as noted for A. spectabilis (Klopper & Smith, 2010). ...
Article
Full-text available
Aloe candelabrum A.Berger (Asphodelaceae: Alooideae), a stately, single-stemmed species from the KwaZulu-Natal province in eastern South Africa, which had been included in the synonymy of A. ferox Mill. for some years, is reinstated. The entire distribution range of A. candelabrum falls within the Maputoland-Pondoland Region of Endemism on the eastern seaboard of South Africa. In contrast, Aloe ferox occurs widely in the Western and Eastern Cape provinces of South Africa, the southern Free State province, as well as southern Lesotho. It does not occur in KwaZulu-Natal.
Article
Full-text available
Aloe spectabilis is a single-stemmed aloe endemic to central KwaZulu-Natal. Its history, flowering, distribution and relationships are discussed.
Inadi River Valley leading into Tugela River Valley
  • Kranskop Dist
Kranskop Dist., Inadi River Valley leading into Tugela River Valley, (–DA), 1943-05-12, Dyer 4383 (PRE);
Aloes of the South African veld
  • H Hardy
BORNMAN, H. & HARDY, D.S. 1972. Aloes of the South African veld. Voortrekkerspers, Johannesburg.
Notes on Aloe ferox Mill. and A. supralaevis Haw., with a new name for a Natal aloe
REYNOLDS, G.W. 1937. Notes on Aloe ferox Mill. and A. supralaevis Haw., with a new name for a Natal aloe. Journal of South African Botany 3: 123–132.
near Keat's Drift in the Mooi River Valley 2930 (Pietermaritzburg): Lion's River Dist., Zwartkop Location
  • Estcourt Dist
Estcourt Dist., near Keat's Drift in the Mooi River Valley, (–DC), 1936-07-28, Reynolds 2034 (PRE). 2930 (Pietermaritzburg): Lion's River Dist., Zwartkop Location, (–CB), 1964-09-30, Moll 1125 (PRE);
3 miles [± 1.9 km] W of Ndwedwe
  • Ndwedwe Dist
Ndwedwe Dist., 3 miles [± 1.9 km] W of Ndwedwe, (–DB), 1966-07-13, Moll 3287A (PRE).
Baron Jacquin and the Schönbrunn gardens
GARSIDE, S. 1942. Baron Jacquin and the Schönbrunn gardens. Journal of South African Botany 8: 201–224.
Plantarum rariorum horti caesarei Schoenbrunnensis descriptiones et icones
  • N J Von
JACQUIN, N.J. VON. 1797. Plantarum rariorum horti caesarei Schoenbrunnensis descriptiones et icones, vol. 1. Wappler, Vienna.