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Strategic Foresight in Multinational Enterprises - A Case Study on the Deutsche Telekom Laboratories

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Strategic Foresight activities enable companies to use weak signals to identify opportunities and threats. Research on Strategic Foresight proposes different methods, discusses their implementation and gives recommendations on how to link Strategic Foresight with other functions in an organization. Based on a literature review, we define a generic framework for the management of Strategic Foresight activities on the strategic, tactical and operational level and identify and discuss actors, methods and systems of Strategic Foresight. Building on an in-depth case study of the Deutsche Telekom Laboratories we shed light on the implementation of Strategic Foresight activities. In the discussion we focus on the interaction of methods from Consumer Foresight and Technology Intelligence. Taking an example project, we explore how Strategic Foresight is used on the operational level of innovation management. We conclude that Strategic Foresight can successfully contribute to coping with uncertainty and complexity and can feed the front-end of innovation from the market (customer needs) and technology (realization opportunities) perspective.
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... The expected effects of size would be that the larger a firm is, the more likely it would be to have established formal CF capabilities (Schwarz 2008;Daheim and Uerz 2008). Large firms need to protect assets and ensure that the firm can renew its competitive advantage (Ruff 2015;Boe-Lillegraven and Monterde 2015;Hines and Gold 2015;Rohrbeck, Arnold, and Heuer 2007). In that respect, it comes as a surprise that the monitoring of the political situation, which led to the removal of subsidies, was not perceived early in the Arla case. ...
... The expected effects of size would be that the larger a firm is, the more likely it would be to have established formal CF capabilities (Schwarz 2008;. Large firms need to protect assets and ensure that the firm can renew its competitive advantage Boe-Lillegraven and Monterde 2015;Hines and Gold 2015;Rohrbeck, Arnold, and Heuer 2007). In that respect, it comes as a surprise that the monitoring of the political situation, which led to the removal of subsidies, was not perceived early in the Arla case. ...
Chapter
Verantwortung in Unternehmen zu übernehmen bedeutet, jeden Tag Unsicherheiten zu akzeptieren und damit umzugehen. Aus diesem Grund bemühen sich Wissenschaft und Praxis um Theorien, Methodologien und Methoden, um dieses Bedürfnis zu unterstützen. Das mittlerweile sehr ausdifferenzierte Feld der Futures Studies ist geprägt von epistemologischen Grundannahmen, die in die theoretischen Positionen hineinragen. Bezüglich der theoretischen Positionen und den methodologischen Rahmen ist danach zu fragen, worauf diese ausgerichtet sind. Geht es nur um Darstellungen oder um bestimmte Vorstellungen, die erreicht werden sollen? Auch die Wahl der Methode, hier konkret die Szenario-Technik, wird davon beeinflusst. Der Rahmen ist damit klar, aber die konkrete Ausgestaltung muss geklärt werden. Das Ziel dieses Beitrags ist es, diese Differenzierung herauszuarbeiten und am Ende mittels zwei Methoden zu erläutern.
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