Women's Labor Supply and Marital Choice

Article (PDF Available)inJournal of Political Economy 96(6):1294-1302 · December 1988with 689 Reads
DOI: 10.1086/261588 · Source: RePEc
Abstract
This paper hypothesizes that value of time, and consequently labor force participation, can vary with circumstances specific to a marriage or a marriage market. Wives' traits valued in the marriage market are expected to be associated with lower labor-force participation, whereas husbands' traits valued in the marriage market are expected to be associated with lower participation rates on the part of wives. Evidence for these hypotheses is found on the basis of regressions of labor-force participation for a sample of Israeli married women. Inclusion of traits valued in the marriage market and marital sorting patterns increases the explanatory power of the regressions. Copyright 1988 by University of Chicago Press.
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  • org/sici?sici=0013-0079%28198207%2930%3A4%3C813%3AATOMFT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-H References A Theory of the Allocation of Time Gary S
    • Url Stable
    Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0013-0079%28198207%2930%3A4%3C813%3AATOMFT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-H References A Theory of the Allocation of Time Gary S. Becker The Economic Journal, Vol. 75, No. 299. (Sep., 1965), pp. 493-517.
  • Socio-economic Occupational Status in Israeli Society Megumoth 25 1): 5-2 1. You have printed the following article: Women's Labor Supply and Marital Choice Shoshana A. Grossbard-Shechtman
    • Andrea Tyree
    Tyree, Andrea. "Socio-economic Occupational Status in Israeli Society" (in Hebrew). Megumoth 25 (September 198 1): 5-2 1. You have printed the following article: Women's Labor Supply and Marital Choice Shoshana A. Grossbard-Shechtman; Shoshana Neuman The Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 96, No. 6. (Dec., 1988), pp. 1294-1302.
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