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Zayd B. Thabit, "A Jew with Two Sidelocks": Judaism and Literacy in Pre-Islamic Medina (Yathrib)

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On est certain qu'au cours de ses annees de formation, Zayd b. Thabit a reellement appris l'ecriture arabe, mais probablement egalement l'arameen/syriaque. Il tient ces competences d'un membre d'un groupe juif appele le Banū Māsika qui vivait a Medine. L'A. suggere qu'entre la mort de son pere dans la bataille de Bu'ath et l'hegire, Zayd fut eleve par les Juifs et pourrait meme avoir ete eleve comme un Juif. Les Arabes lettres qui aiderent le prophete Muhammad a obtenir une residence a Medine ou le culte des idoles etait toujours tres vivant, furent membres d'une elite monotheiste elevee par les Juifs
... Inoltre, la discussa denominazione «Macoraba» attestata presso l'astronomo grecoegiziano Tolomeo (ca.100-ca.170) 33 , e attribuibile secondo alcuni 28 Lecker, 1997. 29 Newby, 1988, 22, 66, passim. ...
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