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Food From the Mouth of Krishna: Feasts and Festivities in a North Indian Pilgrimage Centre

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... What one eats both demarcates one's social boundaries and demonstrates one's spiritual aspirations' (Olivelle 1995: 370). Far from being confined to members of the village community, food is offered to the gods and the divine leftovers distributed as prasad (Breckenridge 1986;Toomey 1994). Food is bestowed on casteless renunciants as alms and presented to ancestors as pinda daan, forging relationships that link this world to others. ...
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... Nevertheless, prasad seems to be distinct from cipa and jutha and the proposed association between them may be farfetched (Gellner, 1992:109). Consumption of sacred substances like prasad is a distinct kind of ritualized intake that shares features with the Eucharist (Toomey, 1994:8). ...
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