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    • "Therefore, it is critical to ensure that clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for AMD abide by rigorous standards of development. However, recent studies have reported significant shortcomings in the quality of CPGs, such as a failure to clearly delineate guideline methodology, poor evidence quality, and lack of conflict of interests disclosures among guideline development group members [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]. In addition, there has been no recent evaluation of CPGs for AMD. "
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose. To evaluate the methodological quality of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Methods. AMD CPGs published by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) and Royal College of Ophthalmologists (RCO) were appraised by independent reviewers using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument, which comprises six domains (Scope and Purpose, Stakeholder Involvement, Rigor of Development, Clarity of Presentation, Applicability, and Editorial Independence), and an Overall Assessment score summarizing methodological quality across all domains. Results. Average domain scores ranged from 35% to 83% for the AAO CPG and from 17% to 83% for the RCO CPG. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the reliability of mean scores for the AAO and RCO CPGs were 0.74 and 0.88, respectively. The strongest domains were Scope and Purpose and Clarity of Presentation. The weakest were Stakeholder Involvement (AAO) and Editorial Independence (RCO). Conclusions. Future AMD CPGs can be improved by involving all relevant stakeholders in guideline development, ensuring transparency of guideline development and review methodology, improving guideline applicability with respect to economic considerations, and addressing potential conflict of interests within the development group.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Ophthalmology
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    • "Physicians may also find the guidelines impractical to implement due to external factors such as limited time, resources, or reimbursement. Since most guidelines are based on expert opinion rather than the findings of randomized, controlled trials, clinicians are increasingly skeptical about potential biases affecting the recommendations of consensus panels [6]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Implementation of practice guidelines is a beguilingly complex activity that requires attention to the task of clinicians, the constraints they face, and the social practice of medicine. Local clinical opinion leaders can accelerate the pace of change by encouraging early adoption and modeling new practices. "Tough love" approaches to guideline adoption have a role in raising the salience of the safe practice. However, successful implementation requires a healthy respect for the challenge of enlisting frontline practitioners in integrating changes into the practice of active clinicians. The implementation of guideline-based practices for aseptic technique in neuraxial analgesia at four Israeli hospitals illustrates the challenges and opportunities associated with changing physician practice.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
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    • "Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are potential tools for facilitating this shift in clinical care. Unfortunately, the quality of the guidelines varies, and their impact on delivering integrated and patient-centered care is still suboptimal [7-12]. Several problems still hinder CPG development and uptake, namely, inadequate management of conflicts of interest (COIs), limited panel composition, lack of patient involvement, and lack of external review [9]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background Guideline development and uptake are still suboptimal; they focus on clinical aspects of diseases rather than on improving the integration of care. We used a patient-centered network approach to develop five harmonized guidelines (one multidisciplinary and four monodisciplinary) around clinical pathways in fertility care. We assessed the feasibility of this approach with a detailed process evaluation of the guideline development, professionals’ experiences, and time invested. Methods The network structure comprised the centrally located patients and the steering committee; a multidisciplinary guideline development group (gynecologists, physicians, urologists, clinical embryologists, clinical chemists, a medical psychologist, an occupational physician, and two patient representatives); and four monodisciplinary guideline development groups. The guideline development addressed patient-centered, organizational, and medical-technical key questions derived from interviews with patients and professionals. These questions were elaborated and distributed among the groups. We evaluated the project performance, participants’ perceptions of the approach, and the time needed, including time for analysis of secondary sources, interviews with eight key figures, and a written questionnaire survey among 35 participants. Results Within 20 months, this approach helped us develop a multidisciplinary guideline for treating infertility and four related monodisciplinary guidelines for general infertility, unexplained infertility, male infertility, and semen analysis. The multidisciplinary guideline included recommendations for the main medical-technical matters and for organizational and patient-centered issues in clinical care pathways. The project was carried out as planned except for minor modifications and three extra consensus meetings. The participants were enthusiastic about the approach, the respect for autonomy, the project coordinator’s role, and patient involvement. Suggestions for improvement included timely communication about guideline formats, the timeline, participants’ responsibilities, and employing a librarian and more support staff. The 35 participants spent 4497 hours in total on this project. Conclusions The novel patient-centered network approach is feasible for simultaneously and collaboratively developing a harmonized set of multidisciplinary and monodisciplinary guidelines around clinical care pathways for patients with fertility problems. Further research is needed to compare the efficacy of this approach with more traditional approaches.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Implementation Science
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