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Abstract

The deleterious health and behavioral consequences of reporting to an abusive supervisor have been documented in past research. Furthermore, recent corporate scandals have led to increased pressure to hold employees accountable for their behaviors and decisions at work. This study examines the interactive effects of abusive supervision on experienced relationships between accountability and work outcomes (job tension, job satisfaction, and emotional exhaustion), with a sample of 366 employees across a myriad of contexts and conditions for answerability. Specifically, it was hypothesized that high levels of perceived abuse would interact with accountability such that job satisfaction declines and tension and exhaustion escalate because of the control-depleting properties of abuse. Study results were supportive of these proposed relationships. Key contributions and limitations of the study, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.

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... In the context of job dissatisfaction, abusive supervision may have the potential to escalate into more dangerous, destructive leadership (Avey et al., 2015), which in turn may make job dissatisfaction more serious. Indeed, as a typical manifestation of destructive leadership at work, abusive supervision seems to have natural links with employees' job dissatisfaction (e.g., Breaux et al., 2008;Hobman et al., 2009;Bowling and Michel, 2011;Haggard et al., 2011;Kernan et al., 2011;Lin et al., 2013;Martinko et al., 2013). Although abusive supervision has been conceptually linked to job dissatisfaction (Tepper, 2000;Tepper et al., 2004), the empirical evidence is rare. ...
... Abusive supervision has broader effects on indices of employees' attitudes (Tepper, 2000). Previous studies have shown that abusive supervision is conceptually associated with job dissatisfaction in a wide range of samples (Tepper et al., 2004;Breaux et al., 2008;Hobman et al., 2009;Bowling and Michel, 2011;Haggard et al., 2011;Kernan et al., 2011;Lin et al., 2013;Martinko et al., 2013). For instance, Tepper (2000) argued that employees who reported abusive supervision were more likely to experience lower levels of job satisfaction. ...
... First, by exploring abusive supervision as an antecedent of employees' job dissatisfaction, our findings encompassed a number of theoretical contributions to the growing research in identifying a leader's role in generating employees' levels of job dissatisfaction. By doing so, our study provided empirical support for previous studies that conceptually linked abusive supervision to job dissatisfaction (e.g., Tepper, 2000;Tepper et al., 2004;Breaux et al., 2008;Hobman et al., 2009;Bowling and Michel, 2011;Haggard et al., 2011;Kernan et al., 2011;Lin et al., 2013;Martinko et al., 2013). Second, the present study hypothesized and found that individual difference variables of feedback avoidance and critical thinking could moderate the abusive supervision-job dissatisfaction relationship. ...
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Although research on the antecedents of job dissatisfaction has been developed greatly, we know little about the role of abusive supervision in generating job dissatisfaction. The contingencies under which abusive supervision relates to employees' job dissatisfaction are still unknown. The present study aimed to fill this research gap by empirically exploring the abusive supervision-job dissatisfaction relationship as well as examining the moderating roles of feedback avoidance and critical thinking on this relationship. We tested the hypotheses with data from a sample of 248 employees from a high-tech communications company in northern China and found that: (a) abusive supervision was positively related to job dissatisfaction; (b) the positive relationship was moderated by both employees' feedback avoidance and critical thinking. We conclude by extracting the theoretical as well as practical contributions, along with a discussion of the promising directions for future research.
... Among the most commonly studied psychological outcomes are stress and emotional exhaustion. Breaux, Perrewé, Hall, Frink, and Hochwarter (2008) examined both of these outcome variables and found that both were most strongly (positively) associated with felt accountability when targets reported high levels of abusive supervision. Relatedly, Carlson, Ferguson, Hunter, and Whitten (2012) observed a positive relationship between abuse ratings and burnout. ...
... We also failed to find any attempt to validate measures of abusive supervision against objective observations of supervisory behavior. Eight studies reiterated the claim of Tepper et al. (2006) that corporations lose $23.8 billion annually because of abusive supervision (i.e., Breaux et al., 2008;Kernan et al., 2011;Lian et al., 2012a;Lin et al., 2013;Liu et al., 2012;Martinko et al., 2011;Tepper et al., 2011;Whitman, Halbesleben, & Shanine, 2013) but did not provide any independent verification of these costs. ...
... ,Breaux et al. (2008),Haggard et al. (2011), Hobman et al. (2009), and Lin et al. (2013 all observed negative relationships between subordinates' reports of abusive supervision and job satisfaction. Additionally,Carlson, Ferguson, Perrewé, and Whitten (2011) observed that perceptions of abusive supervision in the workplace were associated with lower levels of family satisfaction at home. ...
... We synthesized the literature into three overarching categories of strategies from which employees and organizations can draw: management training, prevention of placement, and organizational structure and culture. In general, almost every study we reviewed suggested management training as an effective, and necessary, first step in identifying and eliminating dysfunctional leadership (Breaux, Perrewé, Hall, Frink, & Hochwarter, 2008;Clardy & Beadle, 2001;Harris, Harvey, & Kacmar, 2011;Harris, Kacmar, & Zivnuska, 2007, among many others). Furthermore, Shoss, Eisenberger, Restubog, and Zagenczyk (2013) identified two categories that appear frequently across the literature streams: (a) evaluation procedures designed to prevent the placement of certain individuals in leadership positions and (b) the organization's espousal of a culture that values supportive employee treatment. ...
... To that end, scholars offer suggestions for employees looking for alternative strategies for overcoming the effects of dysfunctional leadership. One of the most prevalent suggestions includes utilizing management development programs (Bassman & London, 1993;Breaux et al., 2008;Clardy & Beadle, 2001). These programs can provide employees a better understanding of dysfunctional leadership, strategies for responding to it, and strategies for avoiding feeling helpless. ...
... While the types of management development programs espoused by Bassman and London (1993) suggest strategies for employees when dealing with dysfunctional leadership, others indicate the necessity of management training that ensures supervisors are equipped with adequate knowledge and skills regarding how to manage effectively (Breaux et al., 2008;Clardy & Beadle, 2001;Harris et al., 2011;Harris et al., 2007). This type of management training can act as a preventive technique and reduces the likelihood that dysfunctional leadership behaviors would emerge in the first place. ...
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Dysfunctional leaders are described in the research literature as those leaders who consistently place burdensome structures in the path of progress, intentionally or unintentionally violate psychological contracts, and generally treat their employees with a disrespectful approach. Research suggests that upward of 13% to 36% of employees in the United States work with a leader whose approach could be described as dysfunctional. Yet, research regarding this negative organizational phenomenon is surprisingly limited. Moreover, scholarship in the field of human resource development (HRD) is nearly void of research on this topic. The purpose of this integrative literature review was to examine the literature on dysfunctional leadership and to highlight conceptual links present across various streams of scholarship. Specifically, we systematically categorized the dysfunctional behaviors that leaders exhibit, highlighted the short- and long-term effects of working under a dysfunctional leader as well as documented the known strategies for working through the effects of dysfunction.
... Many studies have reported a strong positive relationship between abusive supervision and negative employee outcomes, e.g. emotional exhaustion (Breaux et al., 2008;Chi and Liang, 2013;Harvey et al., 2007;Khan et al. 2010;Mackey et al., 2013;Tepper, 2000;Wheeler, Halbesleben and Whitman, 2013), job tension (Breaux et al., 2008;Harvey et al., 2007;Khan et al., 2010), and turnover intention (Harvey et al., 2007;Khan et al., 2010;Schat, Desmarais and Kelloway, 2006;Tepper, 2000), such that the higher the abusive supervision, the higher the negative employee outcomes. Indeed, subordinates' personalities play an important role in moderating the adverse effects of abusive supervision because abusive supervision is a subjective assessment (Tepper, 2000), and the effects of such incivility (e.g. ...
... Many studies have reported a strong positive relationship between abusive supervision and negative employee outcomes, e.g. emotional exhaustion (Breaux et al., 2008;Chi and Liang, 2013;Harvey et al., 2007;Khan et al. 2010;Mackey et al., 2013;Tepper, 2000;Wheeler, Halbesleben and Whitman, 2013), job tension (Breaux et al., 2008;Harvey et al., 2007;Khan et al., 2010), and turnover intention (Harvey et al., 2007;Khan et al., 2010;Schat, Desmarais and Kelloway, 2006;Tepper, 2000), such that the higher the abusive supervision, the higher the negative employee outcomes. Indeed, subordinates' personalities play an important role in moderating the adverse effects of abusive supervision because abusive supervision is a subjective assessment (Tepper, 2000), and the effects of such incivility (e.g. ...
... Abusive supervision has detrimental effects on subordinates' personal and professional life. Victims of supervisory abuse are likely to experience diminished psychological and physical wellbeing, such as emotional exhaustion (Harvey et al., 2007;Kiewitz et al., 2012;Tepper, 2007;Wu and Hu, 2009), job tension (Breaux et al., 2008;Harvey et al., 2007), detachment (Burris, Detert and Chiaburu, 2008), depression (Haggard, Robert and Rose, 2011;Tepper et al., 2007), anxiety (Hobman et al., 2009;Tepper, 2007), and psychological ill health and reduced life satisfaction (Bowling and Michel, 2011;Lin, Wang and Chen, 2013). These negative psychological and physical outcomes have detrimental effects on subordinates' attitudes and behaviours. ...
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Given the conservation of resources (COR) theory, this study examines the moderating effects of intimidation and recognition on the relationship between abusive supervision and a subordinate's job tension, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intention. Consistent with past research, the study found a positive relationship between abusive supervision and negative employee outcomes. However, regardless of the strong theoretical and empirical literature support for the moderating effects of intimidation and recognition on the direct relationship of abusive supervision and negative employee outcomes, empirical data did not reveal any moderating effects of the moderating variables, neither as a single construct nor as a combined construct. For the study, data has been collected through a convenient sampling technique from 443 professional employees in the telecommunications sector in Pakistan. The study contributes to the literature by focusing on the largely ignored subordinate's impression management tactic (e.g. intimidation) and the top management's recognition of the subordinate's job, on the relationship between abusive supervision and negative employee outcomes. Theoretical contributions and practical implications are discussed in the conclusion.
... Common workplace situations that may cause feelings of accountability include reporting to supervisors or team members (Fandt, 1991). This definition is consistent with prior research (Orbuch, 1997), which has described accountability as a socially-construed reality open to actor's individual interpretation of events and context (Breaux et al., 2008). ...
... Table 1 provides descriptive results for Sample 1. Correlations among study variables, which are considered modest by psychometric standards, are consistent with previous research (Breaux et al., 2008;Laird et al., 2009). As shown in Table 2 No VIF score exceeded 1.8 (Tolerance N .55). ...
... As an example of such confusion, bivariate relationships have documented both favorable and unfavorable outcomes of The current issue and full text archive of this journal is available at www.emeraldinsight.com/1362-0436.htm accountability (Hochwarter et al., 2005), often within the same research context (Breaux et al., 2008). ...
... Scholars contend that the favorable or unfavorable result of accountability could depend on contextual moderators, including the level of perceived organizational politics (Zellars et al., 2011). Recently, Breaux et al. (2008) argued that scholarship would benefit by integrating these unique, yet complementary, areas of research. ...
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Purpose – Research has shown accountability can produce both positive and negative outcomes. Further, because of inherent environmental uncertainty, perceptions of organizational politics often interact with accountability to produce negative effects. However, using uncertainty management theory, the purpose of this paper is to argue that employees can use proactive voice to exercise control in the ambiguity of highly accountable and political environments. Design/methodology/approach – This two sample study of graduate school alumni (n ¼ 211) and insurance employees (n ¼ 186) explored the three-way interaction of felt accountability  politics perceptions  proactive voice on work performance, job satisfaction, and job tension. Findings – As hypothesized, high levels of felt accountability and politics were most strongly associated with favorable outcomes when coupled with increased voice behavior. Conversely, felt accountability and politics were related to negative outcomes in settings associated with low proactive voice. Results supported in Sample 1 were then constructively replicated in Sample 2. Practical implications – All employees are held accountable to some degree, and all work in potentially political settings. Often, these environmental features are dictated to employees, leaving only employee reactions in direct control. One possible response is voice. As demonstrated in the present research, employees who engage in proactive voice appear to exercise some degree of control over their environment, resulting in more positive outcomes than their less active counterparts. Originality/value – The present research extends understanding regarding the effects of accountability in organizations by demonstrating that contextual factors (e.g. politics) and individual difference variables (e.g. in levels of proactive voice) differentiate favorable vs unfavorable outcomes of accountability.
... We also failed to find any attempt to validate measures of abusive supervision against objective observations of supervisory behavior. Eight studies reiterated the claim of Tepper et al. (2006) that corporations lose $23.8 billion annually because of abusive supervision (i.e., Breaux et al., 2008; Kernan et al., 2011; Lian et al., 2012a; Lin et al., 2013; Liu et al., 2012; Martinko et al., 2011; Tepper et al., 2011; Whitman, Halbesleben, & Shanine, 2013) but did not provide any independent verification of these costs. ...
... Chang and Lyons further argued that aggression perpetrated by co-workers has direct negative effects on employee's turnover intention, while supervisory aggression results in an employee's turnover intention through a pathway of decreased employee morale. Employee job satisfaction is a factor in and source of employee morale, as the majority of the studies conducted in the domain of abusive supervision have found job satisfaction is an employee's attitude towards his job (Brief, 1998), and is negatively correlated with abusive supervision (Breaux, Perrewé, Hall, Frink, & Hochwarter, 2008). Emotions created by abusive supervision at work, have severe effects on job satisfaction (Richman, Flaherty, Rospenda, & Christensen, 1992) and feelings and frustrations significantly affect job satisfaction particularly when one has low job mobility (Tepper, 2000). ...
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In this article, the researcher proposed a theoretical frame work of supervisory impulsive and strategic abuse. So for majority of the literature had focused on the supervisory impulsive abuse and its effects on employee’s personal and/or professional life while the supervisory strategic abuse have enormously been ignored in the literature. The theoretical frame work offered in this paper will help to identify the boundary line between these two sub-types of abusive supervision. The researcher tried to clarify, with the help of existing literature, boundaries among the sub-types of the construct of abusive supervision e.g. supervisory impulsive and strategic abuse and integrate it into a theoretical model that helps to understand the manifestation of supervisory abusive behaviour in terms of its strategic and impulsive abuse. Further its effects on employee’s morale have also been discussed in its theoretical model. Future research directions have also been discussed in this paper.
... Scores below .10 provide evidence of multicollinearity (Hair, Anderson, Tatham & Black, 1998).Table 1 provides descriptive results for Sample 1. Correlations among study variables, which are considered modest by psychometric standards, are consistent with previous research (Breaux et al., 2008; Laird et al., 2009). As shown inTable 2 ...
... Abusive supervision has been linked to negative psychological outcomes such as psychological distress in several studies (Breaux, Perrewé, Hall, Frink, & Hochwarter, 2008;Haggard, Robert, & Rose, 2011;Tepper et al., 2007). In this study, I found support for the relationship between abusive supervision and symptoms of post-traumatic stress, which is likely to result in somatic complaints (Tepper et al., 2017). ...
Thesis
Abusive supervision is a distressing problem for individuals and organisations, with workplace aggression impacting a disconcerting number of employees. The costs and concerns include absenteeism, health care, and lost productivity. Numerous studies have explored the adverse consequences of abusive supervision, but this study is one of the fewer studies designed to add to the knowledge on antecedents of abusive supervision. In this study, I test a model of implicit bias, microaggressions (employees' evaluations of supervisors’ behaviour as being discriminatory), abusive supervision and employee outcomes (intentions to quit, psychological distress and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder). Manager-related moderating factors between implicit bias and microaggressions (self-monitoring and individualised consideration) are also tested, as are employee-related moderating factors of microaggressions and abusive supervision perceptions (external and hostile attribution styles). Lastly, psychological capital as a moderator of the relations between abusive supervision and adverse employee outcomes is tested. The theoretical framing is social identity and job demands-resources theory, and the sample is a diverse group of manager-employee dyads in the manufacturing industry in South Africa. The critical contribution made by this study is establishing that abusive supervision may be a reflection of managers’ implicit bias toward employees who are racially different from them, via employees’ perceptions of managers’ microaggressions. However, results show that, for managers who also exhibit greater transformational behaviours, racial bias may be associated with lower reports of abusive supervision, as compared to managers who exhibit less transformational leadership: Employees can still recognise the good in an otherwise badly behaving manager. Also, congruent with social identity theory, results show that employees are more likely to perceive their manager’s behaviour as abusive when they project antagonistic and hostile intent onto the manager’s behaviour. A particularly important result, considering the serious implications of this finding for organisations and individuals, is the finding that abusive supervision and post-traumatic stress symptoms are positively associated. Therefore, the psychological toll of abusive supervision may be more severe than demonstrated in previous research. The major methodological contribution of the study is the use of implicit attitude testing (IAT) rather than other or self-reports of racial bias. In summary, my study contributes to the field of organisational psychology by demonstrating that not only does racial bias exist in the workplace today, but that it has also “gone underground,” perhaps becoming more subtle and insidious than earlier forms of racial discrimination. I also found that racial bias was linked to subordinate reports of abusive supervision, through employee reports of subtle acts of racial discriminatory behaviour. The detrimental outcomes from this for diverse employees were numerous. Themes for future research include the determination of the contexts where psychological capital may best function as a mitigating resource on the effects of abusive supervision, to explore religious bias and religious-based microaggressions, and to explore what effect employee social status may have on these relations.
... Long-term commitment requires holding people at all levels of the organization accountable for the organizational objectives. The benefits to be gained from accountability include improved performance processes, transformed company cultures, and internalized ownership of organizational initiatives (Takaki 2005), provided that the accountability is not abusive (Breaux et al. 2008). Bovens (2007) defines accountability as a 'relationship between an actor and a forum, in which the actor has an obligation to explain and to justify his or her conduct, the forum can pose questions and pass judgment, and the actor may face consequences ' (p. ...
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Training is considered an important tool for organizations as they attempt to gain competitive advantages. However, transferring and maintaining the acquired skills and knowledge to the workforce remain problematic. Managerial support is a factor influencing training and its transference. However, the role of top management teams (TMTs) in this process has largely been ignored. This paper posits that the degree to which an organization invests in training initiatives, as well as the percentage of training transference and maintenance, is a function of TMT composition, TMT characteristics, and the degree to which the TMT holds subordinate managers accountable. A model and propositions are advanced in this study.
... In short, the target population of the present study was workers/employees who have faced abusive supervision at work. The reason for selecting abused employees as a target population for the present study was that abusive supervision has adverse effects on an abused employee's performance, attitude, self-respect, physical health, job satisfaction, life satisfaction, organisational commitment, job tension, emotional exhaustion, turnover intention and actual turnover, absenteeism, conflict between work and family-life and psychological distress (Breaux, Perrewé, Hall, Frink, & Hochwarter, 2008;Burris, Detert, & Chiaburu, 2008;Carlson, Ferguson, Hunter, & Whitten, 2012;Khan et al., 2010;Tepper, 2000Tepper, , 2007Tepper et al., 2009;Tepper et al., 2006;Tepper et al., 2004;Zellars et al., 2002). This costs the organisation in terms of lost performance, lost productivity, employee turnover and increased health care expenditures (Tepper, 2007;Tepper et al., 2011). ...
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The researcher in this paper sought to identify the basic components that are integral part of any research methods while conducting a qualitative research. The researcher developed a qualitative research methods chapter while conducting research on a phenomenon of abusive supervision. This paper will help the research students to analyse a phenomenon such as abusive supervision in context of its ontology, epistemology, theoretical perspective, methodology and methods. Furthermore, target population, sampling technique, data collection methods and the role of a researcher in this whole research process, and another essential part of a qualitative research, ethics which play a crucial role while conducting and gathering a qualitative data, have also been discussed in detail.
... However, it has been shown that negative affect (NA) is significantly correlated to abusive supervision (Tepper, Duffy, Henle, & Lambert, 2006) and the dependent variables (e.g. Breaux, Perrewe´, Hall, Frink, & Hochwarter, 2008). Moreover, people with high NA are more apt to focus on unfavorable events (Watson & Pennebaker, 1989). ...
Article
Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, the relations between abusive supervision and emotional exhaustion and intent to leave were examined, as well as the gender differences in these relations. Moreover, the moderating effect of self-esteem was tested in an integrated model stipulating that the gender-moderating effect was mediated by the abusive supervision × self-esteem interaction. Data were collected from 264 employees (111 men;Mage = 32.0 years;Mtenure = 9.2 years). Results of regression analyses indicated that abusive supervision was positively correlated to emotional exhaustion and intent to leave. Women reported higher emotional exhaustion and intent to leave than men. The relations of interest were stronger among employees with higher self-esteem (emotional exhaustion: β = .44; intent to leave: β = .53). The interaction of abusive supervision × self-esteem mediated the gender-moderating effect. Women's stronger responses to abusive supervision may be related to their higher self-esteem, possibly because of the importance of employment to Chinese women.
... Several studies suggest that abusive supervision is associated with negative outcomes such as decreased psychological and physical well-being (Mackey et al. in press;Martinko et al. 2013). Employees' perceptions of abusive supervision also tend to be associated with aggression directed toward supervisors , increased levels of stress and emotional exhaustion (Breaux et al. 2008), and decreased performance (Xu et al. 2012). Previous research demonstrated that employees' perceptions of abusive supervision are an antecedent leading employees to bully others within the workplace (Harris et al. 2013). ...
Article
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Past research has demonstrated that employees’ perceptions of abusive supervision are positively associated with the enactment of bullying behaviors. However, an investigation of the factors influencing employees’ decision to bully others at work has yet to be completed. In this study, we propose that the relationship between perceptions of abusive supervision and the enactment of bullying behaviors is mediated by state self-regulation, and that active coping moderates the relationship between state self-regulation and bullying. Further, we analyze how the situational context (e.g., positive or negative) affects employees’ levels of self-regulatory resource depletion and ultimately, the extent to which they engage in bullying behaviors. A moderated mediation analysis using time-separated data (N = 136) provided support for our hypotheses, suggesting that employees’ state self-regulation helps explain why abusive supervision is associated with bullying and that active coping helps to reduce bullying behaviors. Further, the results suggest that negative environments are associated with more bullying. Contributions, practical implications, and future research directions are discussed.
... It is important to emphasize that emotionally exhausted employees usually feel that they are deficient of adaptive resources which limits the extent to which they can do extra for their jobs (Halbesleben and Buckley, 2004, p. 859). Abusive supervision has a significant positive relationship with emotional exhaustion (Tepper, 2000;Yagil, 2006;Tepper et al., 2007;Aryee et al., 2008;Breaux et al., 2008;Wu and Hu, 2009;Whitman et al., 2014;Scheuer et al., 2016;Pradhan and Jena, 2018). Furthermore, results of a metaanalysis supported a modest association of abusive supervision with emotional exhaustion (Mackey et al., 2017). ...
Article
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We conceptualize and examine an integrated model of compulsory citizenship behavior in the employees of the insurance sector. For this purpose, direct and indirect influences of job demands (active-aggressive and passive-aggressive abusive supervisions) are examined on the compulsory citizenship behavior. In so doing, the relevance of perceived support of coworkers as a job resource and emotional exhaustion as an underlying mechanism is investigated. Data were collected from 205 managerial level employees working in the insurance sector of a developing economy. Both aspects of abusive supervision have both direct and indirect effects through emotional exhaustion on compulsory citizenship behavior. Active-aggressive abusive supervision, coupled with low perceived support of the coworkers influences emotional exhaustion that culminates in increased compulsory citizenship behavior of employees. Interestingly, when perceived support of coworkers is high, the indirect link between active aggressive abusive supervision and compulsory citizenship behavior through emotional exhaustion decreases. For human resource managers, these findings imply that the proper background checks should be made before the recruitment so that employees with troubled past or tending to exhibit aggression can be screened. For line managers, these findings imply that coworkers can play a major role in curbing the compulsory citizenship behavior. Thus, managers should foster such organizational practices that can develop mutual trust and stronger relationship among coworkers so that coworkers can become the perfect source of psychological support.
... In the context of negative leadership styles, the most examined outcome concept is job satisfaction (Schyns & Schilling, 2013). The studies demonstrated that abusive leadership was negatively associated with job-related attitudes (Bowling & Michel, 2011;Breaux, Perrewé, Hall, Frink, & Hochwarter, 2008;Tepper, 2000;Tepper, Duffy, Hoobler, & Ensley, 2004). ...
Article
Evidence regarding the effects of dark leadership is growing but still underrepresented in comparison to studies on positive leadership styles. Particularly, little is known about contextual conditions in which leadership behaviour is directly related to a corresponding negative impact on individuals. Hence, the objective of this contribution is to analyse in how far dark leadership (in this case: abusive supervision) influences the impact of change measures on employees’ wellbeing and attitudinal individual outcomes. Drawing on Conservation of Resources theory (COR), we hypothesize that facing restructuring measures increases job insecurity, and impairs job related attitudes (i.e. job satisfaction) and wellbeing (i.e. work-related irritation) and that this association is aggravated by abusive supervision. Based on longitudinal data acquired from 673 employees working in the finance sector in Germany, we show that after controlling for the outcomes at T1 restructuring experiences and abusive supervision as well as their interactions are related unfavourably to job related attitudes, strain and job insecurity perceptions. It is discussed that restructuring alters the work situation of employees, and that abusive supervision further lowers the individuals’ resources to deal with the organisational change.
... Because some research has pointed to the negative effects of monitoring conducted in a heavy-handed manner, more accountability may not always be better. Breaux et al. (2008) found that accountability had negative effects under conditions of supervisory abuse. ...
... Several researchers asked the questions "what are the consequences of abusive supervision?" and "what happens to employees who are strongly exposed to such supervisors and how does it affect the organization itself". AS is negatively associated with job satisfaction (Breaux et al., 2008), performance (Peng et al., 2014), and psychological wellbeing (Mawritz et al., 2014). Also, there are positive relationships between AS and subordinates' resistance behaviors such as procrastination (Tepper et al., 2001) as well as deviant organizational behaviors (Thau et al., 2009). ...
Article
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We examined how abusive supervision (AS) affected instigated workplace incivility, counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs), organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), and multidimensional work motivations (MWMs), in line with the Job Demands-Resources Model and Social Exchange Theory. We suggested that employees' identification with their workgroup moderates the link between AS and instigated incivility toward coworkers and that organizational identification partially mediates the association of AS with CWBs and OCBs. Furthermore, we hypothesized positive correlations between AS and external regulation as well as amotivation, consistent with the Self-Determination Theory. Finally, we predicted that job-related affective well-being would fully mediate the link between AS and autonomous work motivations while only partially mediating the link between AS and amotivation. Online surveys were used to collect data from 519 white-collar workers. The data revealed that AS was linked to a higher level of incivility toward coworkers. Furthermore, it was linked to both CWBs and OCBs, both directly and indirectly through organizational identification. Organizational identification mediated the associations between AS and MWMs as well. Finally, job-related affective well-being mediated the links of AS with external regulation, amotivation, and autonomous work motivations. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed as well as suggestions for future research.
... Prior research has found that perceptions of supervisory abuse are associated with dysfunctional workplace attitudes and behaviors (Martinko et al. 2013;Tepper 2007) and negative consequences that carry over to home life (Carlson et al. 2011. Specifically, employees' perceptions of abusive supervision have been positively associated with anxiety , job tension (Breaux et al. 2008), intentions to quit (Palanski et al. in press), and spousal undermining (Restubog et al. 2011) and negatively associated with work performance (Harris et al. 2007), job dedication (Aryee et al. 2008), job satisfaction (Haggard et al. 2011), psychological health (Lin et al. 2013), and life satisfaction (Bowling and Michel 2011). ...
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Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of psychological empowerment on the relationship between perceptions of abusive supervision and interpersonal deviance. Design/Methodology/Approach Data were obtained from members of a professional hotel management association (Sample 1: n = 96) and a diverse group of full-time employees (Sample 2: n = 130). We used hierarchical moderated multiple regression analyses to examine the effects of the perceived supervisory abuse × psychological empowerment interaction on coworker- and supervisor-directed deviance. Findings Findings across two samples demonstrated that highly empowered employees were more likely than their less empowered counterparts to engage in coworker-directed deviance when they perceived supervisory abuse, but that psychological empowerment did not moderate the relationship between perceptions of abusive supervision and supervisor-directed deviance. Implications Traditionally, psychological empowerment has been associated with auspicious workplace outcomes (e.g., heightened performance). Results across two samples suggest that highly empowered individuals are more likely than their less empowered counterparts to respond to perceived supervisory mistreatment with coworker-directed deviance. Thus, our results imply that there exists a “dark side” of empowerment such that the negative effects of perceived supervisory abuse trickle over to innocent bystander coworkers, and this relationship is even stronger for empowered employees. Originality/Value This is one of only a few studies to examine moderators capable of altering the negative effects of perceptions of abusive supervision on individuals’ behaviors in the workplace. Additionally, this study is unique given the introduction of psychological empowerment to the abusive supervision literature.
... al, 2007;Cortina & Magley, 2003;Aquino,Tripp & Bies, 2001). Abuse is a stimuli which creates stressful reactions such as; physical health (Bowling & Michel, 2011), job tension (Breaux, Perrewé, Hall, Frink, & Hochwarter, 2008), insomnia (Rafferty, Restubog, & Jimmieson, 2010), emotional exhaustion (Yagil, 2006) and burnout (Carlson, Ferguson, Hunter, & Whitten, 2012). Moreover, abusive supervision is also linked to organizational commitment (Duffy & Ferrier, 2003), work withdrawal and work-family conflict (Chi & Liang, 2013;Hoobler & Hu, 2013). ...
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Employees nowadays go through a lot of emotional trauma. Few of which are personal factors while others are due to work related factors. The aim of this article is to pin down the subordinate's perceptions towards their abusive supervisors and its effect on emotions. Employees when emotionally exhausted are likely to leave the organization provided they have better job opportunities especially when they are unable to handle those emotions due to abuse. Reactance theory and conservation of resource theory has been applied to explain the phenomenon of emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. Data from 155 employees was collected from various banks in Karachi, Pakistan which identified that abusive supervision indirectly increases turnover intention via emotional exhaustion. 32.9% of the variation in turnover intention is due to abusive supervisors and emotional exhaustion. Also, if employees have higher perceived external employability, they are more likely to quit from their jobs in the organization under the leadership of abusive supervisors.
... Interaction between supervisors and subordinates , supervisor continues to show improper behavior, in the long run will lead to psychological problems, such as job nervous and emotional debilitating (Harvey, Stoner, Hochwarter, & Kacmar, 2007 ;Breaux et al, 2008 ;Khan, Qureshi, & Ahmad, 2010), lead to subordinates' feel frustration and helplessness. Face with abusive supervision, let subordinates perceived unfairness (Tepper, 2000(Tepper, , 2007, in fairness perspective, individual motivation is based on a comparison made between colleagues. ...
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This study establishes that a certain type of performance metrics (operational/financial or strategic/relational) is more suitable for pursuing a particular business strategy— prospector/reactor. Using data from 372 organizations, we test hypotheses about the relationships between types of performance metrics emphasized and 1) structural variables, such as organization size and nature of the organization—manufacturing/service and multinational/domestic) and 2) the type of business strategy pursued. We also investigate the overall organizational performance impact of the fit between the types of performance metrics utilized and the business strategy pursued.
... Over the past 20 years, scholars have linked abusive supervision to a wide range of negative outcomes. For instance, abusive supervision has been shown to negatively impact employee attitudes (Breaux et al., 2008), well-being (Lian et al., 2012), and performance (Tepper et al., 2011), with meta-analytic evidence robustly supporting abusive supervision's negative effects (Mackey et al., 2017;Schyns & Schilling, 2013). ...
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... Behavioral reactions (alcohol use and abuse, organizational aggression, bullying toward work colleagues, counterproductive behavior, deviating behaviors, gossip, feedback avoidance, hostility, negative reactions, silencing) Brees et al., 2014;Decoster, Camps, Stouten, Vandevyvere, & Tripp, 2013;Ju et al., 2019;Kluemper et al., 2018;Lopes et al., 2019;Mackey, Brees et al., 2018;Mawritz et al., 2014;Park, Carter, DeFrank, & Deng, 2018;Shao, Resick, & Hargis, 2011;Schyns et al., 2018;Wang, Harms, & Mackey, 2015;Whitman et al., 2014;Yuan et al., 2018. Emotional regulation (self-effectiveness, self-esteem, tension, stress, emotional exhaustion) Agarwal, 2019;Breaux et al., 2008;Chi, & Liang, 2013;Carlson et al., 2012;Frieder et al., 2015;Haggard, & Park, 2018;Han et al., 2017; Revista Eletrônica de Estratégia & Negócios, Florianópolis, v.13, n. 3, set./dez. 2020. ...
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A supervisão abusiva (SA) expressa ações de liderança reconhecida como hostil. Este artigo aborda a SA em contextos organizacionais, partindo de uma revisão da produção científica nos últimos vinte anos. Foram analisados 67 trabalhos teórico-empíricos. Encontramos 8 periódicos especializados com publicações a partir de 2006, e 185 autores com pesquisas conduzidas em 83 países. Tepper (2000) foi a principal referência indicada. A fonte principal dos dados são os subordinados. O delineamento quantitativo foi unânime, apresentando diferentes técnicas de análise dos dados. Modelos teóricos e analíticos predominantes, antecedentes e consequências de SA mais evidenciadas nas pesquisas são discutidos.
... These behaviors do not involve any physical contact between leaders and subordinates or employees. Abusive supervision adversely affects employee outcomes in multiple ways when it appears in organizations and leads to negative implications for employee attitudes (Bowling and Michel, 2011;Breaux et al., 2008) and performance (Aryee et al., 2008). This refers to employee perceptions and the extent to which they perceive their supervisors as engaging in a continued expression of intimidating verbal and nonverbal behaviors (apart from the physical contact). ...
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Recent studies of organizational behavior have witnessed a growing interest in unethical leadership, leading to the development of abusive supervision research. Given the increasing interest in the causes of abusive supervision, this study proposes an organizing framework for its antecedents and tests it using meta analysis. Based on an analysis of effect sizes drawn from 74 studies, comprising 30,063 participants, the relationship between abusive supervision and different antecedent categories are examined. The results generally support expected relationships across the four categories of abusive antecedents, including: supervisor related antecedents, organization related antecedents, subordinate related antecedents, and demographic characteristics of both supervisors and subordinates. In addition, possible moderators that can also influence the relationships between abusive supervision and its antecedents are also examined. The significance and implications of different level factors in explaining abusive supervision are discussed.
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In this study, it is aimed to investigate the moderation roles of perceived organizational support and tightness in the relationships between felt accountability and its consequences. For this purpose, 863 data were obtained in Adana City Hospital via survey method. The results show that felt accountability was positively associated with job-related tension, the dimensions of emotional labor and contextual performance, but negatively correlated with job satisfaction. Moreover, perceived organizational support had a moderation role between felt accountability and some consequences (job satisfaction, contextual performance, histrionics), whereas it did no moderation role between felt accountability and the other consequences (work-related tension, deep action, hidden emotions). Similarly, there was no moderation effects of the tightness in the relationships between felt accountability and its all consequences.
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Despite the growing number of meta-analyses published on the subject of workplace mistreatment, there is no quantitative summary of group differences in the experience of workplace mistreatment in the extant literature. In order to fill this gap, the current study meta-analyzed the impact of sex, race, age, and tenure on reports of workplace mistreatment (e.g., harassment, discrimination, bullying). Results provide some evidence that women, racial minorities, younger employees, and employees with shorter tenures may be more vulnerable to the experience of workplace mistreatment. Moderator analyses additionally reveal that categorization of mistreatment into group and non-group identity mistreatment is important when considering sex and Black/White differences. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to focus on psychological capital (PsyCap) – one of the emerging topics of human resource management, by examining its antecedents and outcomes through the lens of social exchange theory. Design/methodology/approach A meta-analytic approach was applied to validate the proposed hypotheses. Altogether, 105 primary studies published between 2000 and 2018 were collected and used. Findings Results show that leadership styles (authentic leadership, ethical leadership, abusive leadership) and organizational support are antecedents and desirable work attitudes (job satisfaction, organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior) are consequences of PsyCap. Employee’s characteristics significantly moderated the relationship between PsyCap and work attitudes. Originality/value This was the first attempt to examine PsyCap in a theoretical framework with its antecedents and outcomes and furthermore, to apply a meta-analytic method. The moderating role of employee characteristics in the relationship between PsyCap and work attitudes is also explored.
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Despite the growing number of meta-analyses published on the subject of workplace mistreatment and the expectation that women and racial minorities are mistreated more frequently than men and Whites, the degree of subgroup differences in perceived workplace mistreatment is unknown. To address this gap in the literature, we meta-analyzed the magnitude of sex and race differences in perceptions of workplace mistreatment (e.g., harassment, discrimination, bullying, incivility). Results indicate that women perceive more sex-based mistreatment (i.e., mistreatment that explicitly targets a person's sex) in the workplace than men (δ = .46; k = 43), whereas women and men report comparable perceptions of all other forms of mistreatment (δ = .02; k = 300). Similarly, although racial minorities perceive more race-based mistreatment (i.e., mistreatment that explicitly targets a person's race) in the workplace than Whites (δ = .71; k = 18), results indicate smaller race differences in all other forms of workplace mistreatment (δ = .10; k = 61). Results also indicate that sex and race differences have mostly decreased over time, although for some forms of mistreatment, subgroup differences have increased over time. We conclude by offering explanations for the observed subgroup differences in workplace mistreatment and outline directions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record
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Purpose The vast majority of research on traditional leadership focuses on effective and positive leadership behavior. However, scholars have begun to pay attention to the impact of negative leadership behavior on employees and the organization. Hence, the main purpose is to examine the effects of abusive supervision. While the literature does not examine the time future orientation of the effects of abusive supervision, the purpose of this paper is to fill up this gap and examine the moderating role of future orientation. Design/methodology/approach A total of 584 valid questionnaires were collected from respondents aged between 21 and 30 years old and analyzed using the hierarchical regression and structural equation modeling method. Findings The main results show that abusive supervision positively affects counterproductive work behavior and future orientation positively moderates both the relationship between abusive supervision and originality behavior and the relationship between abusive supervision and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Originality/value This study demonstrates the moderating roles of future orientation in the effects of abusive supervision, and thus deepens the understanding of the moderating effect. It departs from the prior works and presents a more detailed examination examines the distinct dimensions of personality traits. It makes three main theoretical contributions. First, it introduces uncertainty management theory as a means to interpret the effects of abusive supervision. Second, it contributes to the literature on abusive supervision. Third, it does not lead to discovery as an OCB and originality, conclusions which differ from the results suggested in past literature.
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An interactive model of social undermining and social support in the workplace was developed and tested among police officers in the Republic of Slovenia. As predicted, social undermining was significantly associated with employee outcomes, in most cases more strongly than was social support. High levels of undermining and support from the same source were associated with negative outcomes. However, support from one source appeared to only modestly attenuate the negative effects of social undermining from another source.
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We test hypotheses derived from two alternative perspectives regarding the association between supervisory abuse and subordinate problem drinking. Drawing from the employee resistance literature, we examine the degree to which such an association may be sensitive to variation in subordinate personality. Drawing from the stress literature, we examine the degree to which this association may be mediated by somatic stress. Multi-source data from 1473 blue-collar workers employed in 55 work units, indicates that while the main effect of abusive supervision on problem drinking is attenuated under conditions of high subordinate conscientiousness and agreeableness (consistent with a resistance-based explanation), the main effect is not mediated by somatic stress.
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Burnout is a unique type of stress syndrome, characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishment. Although burnout has been shown to be potentially very costly in the helping professions, such as nursing, education, and social work, little work has been done thus far to establish its generalizability to industry. This article reviews the literature on burnout and provides a conceptual framework designed to improve the understanding of burnout. Propositions are presented that are aimed at clarifying the dynamics of burnout, including determinants of and interrelationships among the three burnout components.
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Bullying in organizations has become one the prime social phenomena which can have a direct as well as indirect impact on the productivity of employees and managers. While bullying is a part of the fabric of society, the rate of occurrence as well as the severity of bullying acts in the workplace is alarming. This paper puts forth a model that illustrates the triangular relationship and interaction between the three components in the bullying event: 1) the organizational environment and its impact on the occurrence of bullying activities; 2) the characteristics of those that bully; and 3) the characteristics of those being bullied (e.g., victims of bullying). These three interrelated issues form the triangle of bullying that is examined in this paper. This paper posits that a major source of many of the personnel relational problems faced in the workplace between coworker and coworker or manager and employees comes from bullies, just like the ones experienced on the childhood playground. Research shows that child bullies and those bullied as children have the potential to become adult bullies. Combine that with the complex, diverse, global business arena that creates high levels of stress, it is easy to understand why there is the possibility of boardroom/workplace bullies. "Bullying at work is claimed to be more crippling and devastating problem for employees than all other work related stress put together... " (Einarsen, 1999).
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A petty tyrant is defined as one who lords his or her power over others. Preliminary empirical work suggests that tyrannical behaviors include arbitrariness and self-aggrandizement, belittling others, lack of consideration, a forcing style of conflict resolution, discouraging initiative, and noncontingent punishment. A model of the antecedents of tyrannical management and the effects of tyranny on subordinates is presented. Petty tyranny is argued to be the product of interactions between individual predispositions (beliefs about the organization, subordinates, and self, and preferences for action) and situational facilitators (institutionalized values and norms, power, and stressors). Tyrannical management is argued to cause low self-esteem, performance, work unit cohesiveness, and leader endorsement, and high frustration, stress, reactance, helplessness, and work alienation among subordinates. It is further argued that these effects may trigger a vicious circle which sustains the tyrannical behavior. Research implications are discussed.
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Health and well-being in the workplace have become common topics in the mainstream media, in practitioner-oriented magazines and journals and, increasingly, in scholarly research journals. In this article, we first review the literature that serves to define health and well-being. We then discuss the primary factors associated with health and well-being, the consequences of low levels of health and well-being, and common methods for improving health and well-being in the workplace. Finally, we highlight important future directions for future theory, research, and practice regarding health and well-being from an organizational perspective.
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Purpose – The purpose of this research paper was to examine the construct of accountability and its impact leadership development initiative in an upward feedback framework. Previous research has suggested that accountability may be an important moderator of the relationship between upward feedback and self-development. However, there has been little research examining the construct of accountability and this study sought to modify that. Design/methodology/approach – Within the context of upward feedback the present study examined the impact of two contextual antecedents of accountability (LMX and feedback environment) and self-development initiative as an outcome of accountability in a path model framework. Survey methodology was used to assess the constructs of interest and the results were analyzed with regression-based path modeling. Findings – The results indicate the path model was partially supported by the data: the feedback environment and LMX were related to accountability and accountability was related to self-development initiative. Research limitations/implications – Limitations of this study include the self-report methodology and relatively small sample size. Originality/value – The current study was unique in that it examined manager's perceptions of accountability for using upward feedback. Managers who utilize upward feedback for self-development are role models for subordinates and others, potentially contributions to a favorable feedback environment.
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