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Helping healthcare entrepreneurs: A case study of Angel Healthcare Investors, LLC

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Abstract

There is a significant financing gap for businesses seeking between $US250 000 and $US2 million. Filling this gap are the approximately 400 000 business angels scattered across the country who invest approximately $US30-40 billion a year in 50 000 early stage businesses. Increasingly angels are investing together in groups. Angel Healthcare Investors (AHI), LLC is one such angel group comprising investors with backgrounds in the healthcare sector who invest in innovative business start-ups in various healthcare markets. The paper describes AHI's operations, yield rates and portfolio firms. It concludes with a view of current trends in angel investing.

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... For example, in their review of 148 journal papers on business angels published between 1981 and 2015, Tenca, Croce, and Ughetto (2018) identify just two papers on angel networks or groups. The literature on angel groups comprises a handful of case studies (mainly written by practitioners) (e.g., May and Simmons 2001;May 2002;Cerullo and Sommer 2002;Payne and Mccarty 2002;May and O'Halloran 2003) and just a few scholarly studies (Sudek 2006;Becker-Blease and Sohl, 2011;Gregson, Mann, and Harrison 2013;Carpentier and Suret 2015;Mason, Botelho, and Harrison 2016;Croce, Tenca, and Ughetto 2017) and some general discussions (Mason 2006;Sohl 2007Sohl , 2012. ...
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Angel Investment Activity: Bracing For The Downdraft. Paper presented at the Babson College
  • J Sohl
  • B Sommer