Article

Pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema after dental extraction detected incidentally by regular medical checkup: A case report

Department of Oral Surgery, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa, Japan.
Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology (Impact Factor: 1.46). 03/2009; 107(4):e33-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.tripleo.2008.12.019
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Most cases of pneumomediastinum are caused by iatrogenic injury during surgery on the cervical region and chest or by tracheostomy. It is also well known that emphysema may occur secondary to dental treatment using an air turbine drill, but there have been few cases of emphysema extending to involve the mediastinum. Presented is a rare case in which subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum developed asymptomatically, probably due to extraction of a mandibular third molar, and were found incidentally on the day after the dental procedure. To avoid subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum associated with dental treatment and surgical intraoral procedures such as tooth extraction, air turbine drills should be used only when it is essential.

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    • "Both areas were affected in the case presented in this study. Arai et al. [2] included a review of 47 clinical cases of subcutaneous emphysemas and pneumomediastinum treated between 1994 and 2008, 18 of which appeared after a dental extraction. McKenzie and Rosenberg [13] reviewed 32 cases "
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    ABSTRACT: Subcutaneous emphysema in the head and neck is a well known clinical condition. It is an uncommon clinical complication of dental treatment caused by forceful injection of air into the loose connective tissue below the dermal layer. The trapped air is often limited by subcutaneous space in the head and neck. This paper presents a clinical case in which subcutaneous emphysema developed immediately during surgical extraction of third molar.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Open Journal of Stomatology
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    • "Both areas were affected in the case presented in this study. Arai et al. [2] included a review of 47 clinical cases of subcutaneous emphysemas and pneumomediastinum treated between 1994 and 2008, 18 of which appeared after a dental extraction. McKenzie and Rosenberg [13] reviewed 32 cases "

    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
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    • "Surgical procedures in oral cavity or extraction of lower molars especially the third inferior molar can lead to development of emphysema and pneumomediastinum when air turbine dental drills are used[11,12,15]. To avoid these complications, air turbine drills should be used only in necessary cases. "
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    ABSTRACT: Pneumomediastinum is commonly caused by iatrogenic injury such as surgery on the cervical planes and chest or by tracheostomy. It is also well known that emphysema may occur after dental treatments using an air turbine drill, but there have been few cases of emphysema which extended to the mediastinum. A 16-year-old boy is presented with subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum which developed 24 hours after surgery for extraction of an inferior second molar. We first describe history, clinical presentation and radiologic appearance of our patient and then review the literature about oral surgery causing pneumomediastinum. Surgical procedures in oral cavity can lead to the development of emphysema and pneumomediastinum when air turbine dental drills are used. To avoid these complications, air turbine high speed drills should be used only in necessary cases.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2011
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