Article

Meditation, Adult Development, and Health: Part III

Authors:
  • Huntington Meditation and Imagery Center
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Abstract

This is the third article establishing a foundation of meditation practice for adult development. In the first article, it was argued mental and emotional health deteriorate when the maturing years of life are faced by a personality limited to habitual, fixated defenses. In the second article, the specific types of mental and emotional suffering and the specific types of meditation to reduce that suffering were described. In this article, the acceptance of meditative experiences into the personality is described. Acceptance is delineated in stages to assist the helping professional in assessing their clients' developments in consciousness.

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