Article

Cu2O as a Photocatalyst for Overall Water Splitting under Visible Light Irradiation

Tokyo Institute of Technology, Edo, Tokyo, Japan
Chemical Communications (Impact Factor: 6.83). 02/1998; 3(3):357-358. DOI: 10.1039/a707440i

ABSTRACT

Photocatalytic decomposition of water into H2 and O2 on Cu2O under visible light irradiation is investigated; the photocatalytic water splitting on Cu2O powder proceeds without any noticeable decrease in the activity for more than 1900 h.

Full-text preview

Available from: skif.biz
  • Source
    • "Cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) presents major interesting characteristics: it is not toxic, abundantly available, not costly and environmentally friendly [1]. Due to its fascinating properties [2] [3], Cu 2 O is useful in a wide range of applications such as solar energy conversion [2] [4], lithium ion batteries [5] [6], gas sensors [7] [8], photocatalysis for splitting water into O 2 and H 2 under visible light [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] and degradation of organic pollutants under visible light irradiation [15], catalytic oxidation [16] and complete CO oxidation [17]. Different methods have been used to synthesize Cu 2 O as a nanostructured material including thermal oxidation of Cu metal [18], spray pyrolysis deposition [19], solvothermal synthesis [20], solution-phase reduction [21], thermal decomposition [17,22], electro-deposition [23,9], sol–gel-like dipping [24], magnetron sputtering [25], microplasma method [26] and chemical deposition [27–29]. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Jan 2016
  • Source
    • "Cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) presents major interesting characteristics: it is not toxic, abundantly available, not costly and environmentally friendly [1]. Due to its fascinating properties [2] [3], Cu 2 O is useful in a wide range of applications such as solar energy conversion [2] [4], lithium ion batteries [5] [6], gas sensors [7] [8], photocatalysis for splitting water into O 2 and H 2 under visible light [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] and degradation of organic pollutants under visible light irradiation [15], catalytic oxidation [16] and complete CO oxidation [17]. Different methods have been used to synthesize Cu 2 O as a nanostructured material including thermal oxidation of Cu metal [18], spray pyrolysis deposition [19], solvothermal synthesis [20], solution-phase reduction [21], thermal decomposition [17,22], electro-deposition [23,9], sol–gel-like dipping [24], magnetron sputtering [25], microplasma method [26] and chemical deposition [27–29]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present work reports on a one-step synthesis of thin Cu2O films deposited at 250°C using pulsed-spray evaporation chemical vapor deposition (PSE-CVD). Of interest, water addition (0, 2.5 and 5vol.%) in the liquid feedstock of Cu(acac)2 and ethanol was found to have a significant effect on the catalytic performance of these films towards CO oxidation. The obtained films were comprehensively characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Helium ion microscopy (HIM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrometry. Both the surface composition and optical properties exhibited good correlation with the catalytic activity. The adopted empirical catalytic screening based on light-off curves measurement demonstrated that Cu2O prepared with 5vol.% of water in the reactant feedstock exhibited the best performance with respect to complete oxidation of CO at 175°C. This finding is reproducible and tentatively attributed to reduced crystallite grain size and more surface oxygen species generated when water was added in the feedstock. Accordingly, the innovative combination of water addition in the feedstock and the use of PSE-CVD technique is expected to assist further synthesis of new efficient thin films paving the way for catalytic applications.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Applied Catalysis B Environmental
  • Source
    • "not mimicking Z-Scheme). We are here modifying Copper (I) Oxide, a well-known p-type semiconductor [7][8], with Ruthenium (IV) oxide nanoparticles to use as a photocatalyst under visible light range, for overall water splitting. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Overall decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen in presence of a heterogeneous photocatalyst has received prodigious attention due to its potential for the production of clean and recyclable hydrogen energy. However, most of the efficient photocatalysts developed till date, works primarily on ultra-violate range of light. To develop photocatalysts that can decompose water under more abundant visible range of light, efforts have already been made by researchers who basically tried to synthesize materials which have such a narrow band gap that they can utilize less energetic photons in visible range. To do so, the catalysts that they have prepared to exhibit high stability and to give decent reaction rate and quantum efficiency are of extremely complex structure. Moreover, cumbersome synthesis route involving doping of different materials, complicated core-shell nanostructure preparation, etc is necessary in most of the cases. Here, we report a facile and efficient approach to facilitate photocatalytic water-splitting under visible light, in single step. We have modified Cu2O, a well-known p-type semiconductor having a band-gap ∼2.1 eV, with RuO2 nanoparticles and used it as photocatalyst. We have observed that it has a possibility of near-stoichiometric overall water decomposition under visible light with appreciable quantum efficiency.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Energy Procedia
Show more