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Social Accounting for Nonprofits

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After giving an overview of the development of social account- ing, this article presents two models of social accounting for nonprofits: the community social return on investment model and the expanded value-added statement. The discussion focuses on the process for establishing a comparative market value for nonmarket social outputs. The authors discuss these models and the comparative market value in relation to social accounting, an academic field that has evolved as part of a critique of finan- cial accounting, especially its failure to analyze the impact of the organization on society and the natural environment. For the most part, scholars have not related social accounting to non- profits. This article attempts to draw nonprofits into the field of social accounting. Both models address the social impact of non- profits by including social inputs and outputs that accounting statements normally exclude.
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