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Abstract

University-based teacher-education programmes in the USA confront mounting pressure to demonstrate that graduates will have a significant and positive impact on student achievement. Such pressure has forced teacher educators to wrestle with the question of what constitutes compelling evidence that teacher candidates will indeed have such an impact. This paper presents the deliberations and resulting investigation of a team of university faculty members seeking to account for preservice elementary-school teachers' learning and development. It offers a preliminary articulation of a trajectory of learning, and a critique of the tasks and the programmatic experiences from which this trajectory is constructed.

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... Whether PCK is fixed, or fluid and related to the environment, attempts have been made to delineate the elements of PCK and chart the way in which student teachers develop PCK in specific subject areas (Friedrichsen, Van Driel, & Abell, 2011;Kleickmann et al., 2013;Singer-Gabella & Tiedemann, 2008;Twiselton, 2000;Wongsopawiro, Zwart, & Van Driel, 2017). In the case of early reading, Phelps & Schilling (2004) argued that the content knowledge needed was ill defined as there was an assumption that teachers who could read would be able to teach reading. ...
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... Teacher education curricula based on competences seem closer to the Curriculum culture in which teachers account for pupils' learning and development with reference to predefined goals (Hudson 2002, Singer-Gabella & Tiedemann 2008. In the empirical part of this paper we explore whether the perceptions of changes in teacher education curricula can be interpreted using the continuum between Didaktik and Curriculum cultures. ...
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Excerpts available on Google Books. For more info, go to publisher's website : http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780195117530.do
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children's cognitive development is described . . . from the perspective of an evolving neo-Piagetian theory of intellectual development / series of studies designed to test the theory in a variety of content domains, with a variety of tasks, is reported describe studies which assessed some aspect of logical-mathematical cognition, using tasks which varied widely in surface content and in procedural demands / describe studies which assessed some aspect of social cognition, using tasks which once again spanned a variety of surface content and procedural demands / compare and contrast our current theoretical conceptions with our previous ones, as well as with the classical Piagetian theory of cognitive development (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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