Search for Interstellar Furan and lmidazole

Article · February 1972with 4 Reads
Source: NTRS
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Abstract
Results are reported on an unsuccessful 6-cm search for the heterocyclic carbon ring molecules furan and imidazole. Upper limits in brightness temperature of 0.25 K or less are found for furan in 11 galactic sources, and of less than 0.1 K for imidazole in Sgr A and Sgr B2.
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