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Theobiology: Interfacing Theology and Science

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Abstract

Theobiology proposes that not only pertinent disciplines from the sciences be brought into theological, psychology-of-religion, and spirituality discussions and analyses but that this be done on a systematic, consistent basis. Theobiology does not presume any primacy of the sciences over theology or the psychology of religion/spirituality or vice versa. Nor is revealed knowledge or divine revelation seen as any less important than scientific knowledge. In this theory and methodology, sciences serve as tools or aids to give us deeper understanding of theology and psychology of religion/spirituality. Theobiology theoretical undergirdings include the philosophical approach, with search for truth coming about through logical reasoning rather than factual direct observation and analysis of bases and concepts of fundamental beliefs, and hermeneutics recognizing that all sciences are needed for the most accurate, appropriate interpretation of theological matters.

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