Article

Longitudinal Benefits Of Wellness Coaching Interventions For Cancer Survivors: 886

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Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the immediate and longitudinal impact of 6 Wellness Coaching (WC) sessions for cancer survivors in improving health, fitness, well-being, and overall quality of life (QOL). Methodology: Thirty participants were recruited in three states and received intervention through the telephone. The participants included 20 breast, 7 prostate and 3 colorectal cancer survivors who ranged between 0.5-9 years since primary treatment ended. Instrument measures at baseline and the completion of the program included (3, 9, and 15 months from baseline): Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale (HADS), Exercise Stage Assessment, Quality of Life Patient/Cancer Survivor and Self-Efficacy Scales. A web-based self report Wellcoach® Well-being Measurement was also completed on-line. This was used for documentation and follow-up communication between coaching sessions with a certified wellness coach and fitness professional for 6 WC sessions for 3 months. They were followed for a year after the completion of the intervention to evaluate the sustainability of WC. Results: During the intervention period, significant improvements were found in depression (p=.003) and anxiety (p=.002) measured by HADS, increased Exercise Stage Assessment (p=.001), and QOL (p=.001). Positive trends were noted in all other measures during the 3 months of coaching. These positive trends continued from the cessation of coaching to 6 months after the intervention. A slight decline in these improvements was observed from 6 to 12 month but did not return to baseline. Patient-reported WC process improved lifestyle habits by helping with positive goal setting, awareness of food choices, and exercise as primary elements. Actual reported changes and improvements included exercise and eating healthier. The most helpful aspect of working with a personal coach included motivation and feedback. Self report of fruit and vegetable consumption increased, and BMI and weight were © Common Ground, Mary Louise Galantino, Pam Schmid, Anthony Milos, Sheila Leonard, Stasia Botis, Courtney Dagan, William Albert, Janet Teixeira, Jun Mao, All Rights Reserved.

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... Given that cancer survivors may have a range of needs they need to self-manage, but have decreased confidence to do this, there is a clear role of coaching to increase self-confidence to manage a wide range of problems. Only two cancer coaching studies have involved participants self-selecting goals [16, 17], but these did not report the goal selection process, measure goal achievement or impact on self-confidence. This study was therefore conducted to explore the feasibility of delivering and measuring the impact of a life-coaching intervention specifically designed to rebuild people's confidence and emotional well-being and enhance QoL by supporting individuals to select and achieve their own post-treatment goals. ...
... It would therefore be important to test these findings in a larger r a n do m i s e d , c o nt r o l l e d tr i a l . T he h o m o ge n ou s sociodemographic participant profile achieved in this study is reflective of previous coaching studies that recruited cancer survivors [14, 16], and recruitment strategies developed for future work should also seek to attract as broad a range of individuals as possible to increase generalisability. Findings suggest that the mechanism by which coaching builds selfconfidence is through reinforcing participant's 'efficacy expectations' (although possible increases in self-efficacy may have occurred independent of the coaching) [19, 20]. ...
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Background: Cancer survivors often experience decreased self-confidence which impacts negatively on their ability to self-manage the practical, social and emotional problems frequently faced as they emerge from end of treatment. This was a feasibility study of a life-coaching intervention, designed to rebuild confidence of survivors and support transition to life after cancer treatment. Methods: A one group pre-test, post-test design was used, recruiting participants from community organisations. Eligibility criteria are as follows: <1 year of completion of primary cancer treatment, aged >18, no metastases, and no mental health problems. Participants received one individualised face-to-face and five telephone coaching sessions over 3 months. Outcome measures are as follows: New General Self-Efficacy Scale, Hope Scale, Personal Well-being Index, Assessment of Survivorship Concerns, Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Social Difficulties Index, and a goal attainment score. Interviews explored feasibility, acceptability and impact of life-coaching and research design. Results: Nine women and two men were recruited, representing varying cancer diagnoses. All outcome measures were sensitive to change and indicated positive trends post-intervention. Participant interviews indicated the intervention was well received and had a positive impact. Lessons were learnt about study design, recruitment and intervention delivery. Conclusions: Life-coaching has a potential to enable cancer survivors to manage the transition to life beyond cancer and effect change on a range of outcomes. The intervention was feasible to deliver and acceptable to survivors at a time when many struggle to make sense of life. It merits further evaluation through a randomised controlled trial.
... For example, Wennberg et al found that a targeted care-management program with telephonic health coaching for individuals insured by a large health plan reduced medical costs and hospitalizations.13 Similarly, studies of health coaching for patients with diabetes,14-17 obesity,18,19 cancer,20 and risk of21 or diagnosed cardiovascular disease22,23 demonstrate a positive effect on health behaviors or health outcomes. However, review of the literature reveals other evaluations of coaching that find non-significant benefits for health outcomes.24-27 ...
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