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Bringing Society Back In: Symbols, Practices, and Institutional Contradictions

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... By utilising an institutional logics framework for this purpose, in line with the use of the concept Friedland and Alford (1991) may have intended, as will become clear, a local social grounding is provided and the interrelated nature of actions and their institutional bases recognised. ...
... Distinctions between old 'micro' and new 'macro' perspectives, as some institutionalists, too, have come to argue, need reconciliation (Barley, 2008;Hinings and Tolbert, 2008). Fundamental to this assertion is Friedland and Alford's (1991) turn-or, rather, return-to individual and organised behaviour as simultaneously sensed and acted upon, that is, institutionalised and institutionalising. ...
... But "theoretical tools" sensitive to this interplay are noticeable for their absence in writings associated with neo-institutionalism (Friedland and Alford, 1991, p. 244). This appreciation as well as the proposed answer of societal orders and institutional logics across levels of analysis has become a dominant theme in contemporary institutionalist research (Friedland and Alford, 1991;Thornton et al., 2012). Ironically, despite Friedland and Alford's (1991) frequently cited work being titled 'bringing society back in', recent advances of this debate continuously call for a reemphasis on the distinctiveness of institutions (Meyer and Höllerer, 2014) or heterogeneity of formal organisations (Greenwood et al., 2014). ...
... researchers deciding to carry out Mode-1 research). A fundamental question in institutional research is how institutional logics gain a foothold in social settings and how established logics are preceded by contested social processes (Friedland & Alford, 2010;Swan et al., 2010). This question is highly relevant for understanding how scholar-practitioner projects 'function', since in these settings participants' backgrounds are so different that a particular logic for managing collaborations cannot be presumed. ...
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