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Media-Based Strategies to Reduce Racial Stereotypes Activated by News Stories

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Abstract

This study focuses on the role of media in facilitating and inhibiting the accessibility of stereotypes primed by race-related news stories. Specifically, it examines experimentally the effects of two strategies for reducing stereotype accessibility: an audience-centered approach that explicitly instructs audiences to be critical media consumers, a goal of media literacy training; and a message-centered approach using stereo-type-disconfirming, counter-stereotypical news stories. Participants viewed either a literacy or control video before reading stereotypical or counter-stereotypical news stories about African Americans or Asian Indians. Implicit stereotypes were measured using response latencies to hostile and benevolent stereotypical words in a lexical decision task. Results suggest that a combination of audience-centered and message-centered approaches may reduce racial stereotypes activated by news stories.
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MEDIA-BASED STRATEGIES TO REDUCE RACIAL STEREOTYPES ACTIVATED BY NEWS STORIES
Srividya Ramasubramanian
Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly; Summer 2007; 84, 2; ABI/INFORM Global
pg. 249
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... Step one is activation, which is automatic, and step two is the application, which is more intentional (Ramasubramanian, 2007). However, personal relevance (or individual motivation) can change the route of the process (Gilbert & Hixon, 1991). ...
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