Article

Relationship between self-efficacy and physical activity among patients with type 2 diabetes

Department of Medical Humanities & Social Sciences, Florida State University College of Medicine, 1115 W. Call St., Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA.
Journal of Behavioral Medicine (Impact Factor: 3.1). 02/2009; 32(3):270-7. DOI: 10.1007/s10865-009-9200-0
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

While previous studies indicate a significant relationship between self-efficacy and physical activity, less research has focused on this relationship among patients with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether self-efficacy mediated the relationship between participation in a 1-month, print-based physical activity intervention and improvements in activity levels.
Participants (N = 85; mean age = 57; 73% Caucasian; 69% female) were recruited from a community diabetes center. The intervention was individually-tailored based on theoretical constructs, including self-efficacy.
After controlling for age, baseline activity, and baseline self-efficacy, the tailored intervention was associated with significant improvements in physical activity, 95% CI [23.01, 271.68] as well as self-efficacy, CI [0.02, 3.48]. There was an indirect effect of treatment on physical activity through self-efficacy, CI [0.77, 73.11], and the direct effect of treatment on physical activity was no longer significant, CI [-7.33, 253.40], after the influences of self-efficacy change were accounted for in the model.
Results supported a mediation effect, such that the treatment effect on physical activity was completely mediated by changes in self-efficacy. Although replication is needed, results support the theoretical rationale for targeting self-efficacy to promote physical activity among patients with type 2 diabetes.

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    • "mesma maneira, intervenções que visam melhorar a autoeficácia para atividade física impactam positivamente no aumento da atividade física (Larson, Covey, Kapella, Alex, & McAuley, 2014), e ter uma boa AE para atividade física é importante para a manutenção da mesma (Higgins, Middleton, Winner, & Janelle, 2014). Estudos recentes com pacientes diabéticos tipo 2 mostraram o impacto de uma intervenção destinada a aumentar a atividade física no aumento da atividade física, o qual era mediado pelas crenças de AE (Dutton et al., 2009). Não foram encontrados estudos brasileiros avaliando a autoeficácia em pacientes com Síndrome Metabólica. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    • "mesma maneira, intervenções que visam melhorar a autoeficácia para atividade física impactam positivamente no aumento da atividade física (Larson, Covey, Kapella, Alex, & McAuley, 2014), e ter uma boa AE para atividade física é importante para a manutenção da mesma (Higgins, Middleton, Winner, & Janelle, 2014). Estudos recentes com pacientes diabéticos tipo 2 mostraram o impacto de uma intervenção destinada a aumentar a atividade física no aumento da atividade física, o qual era mediado pelas crenças de AE (Dutton et al., 2009). Não foram encontrados estudos brasileiros avaliando a autoeficácia em pacientes com Síndrome Metabólica. "

    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015
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    • "Importantly, there is robust evidence that self-efficacy is a prerequisite for successful behavior change throughout a variety of health-related domains, including physical activity (e.g., Holden, 1991; Rovniak et al., 2002; Sharma and Sargent, 2005; Gwaltney et al., 2009). Moreover, several recent studies have shown that self-efficacy mediates the effects of health promotion interventions on objectively assessed physical activity (e.g., Burke et al., 2008; Dutton et al., 2009; Darker et al., 2010). Thus, our results tentatively suggest that, although the augmented intervention was not related with elevated levels of physical activity, it might have increased the likelihood of the participants to become more active in the long run, because they were more confident to do so. "
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    ABSTRACT: Sedentarism is a serious health concern in industrialized countries throughout the world. We examined whether a text message-based intervention, targeted at increasing daily levels of physical activity, would be more effective than a standard psychoeducational intervention and a control condition. Sixty-three individuals (43 women) with a mean age of 23.7 years participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to a psychoeducational standard intervention; an augmented intervention with additional short text messages sent to the mobile phones to remind participants of their action plans, and a control condition. Objectively assessed physical activity and self-efficacy were assessed pre- and post-intervention. Participants in the control condition showed a significant decline in physical activity from pre-assessment to post-assessment, whereas participants in both intervention arms exhibited a slight increase. Moreover, the augmented intervention resulted in a marginally significant increase in self-efficacy, whereas the standard intervention resulted in a significant decrease. The findings suggest that short text messages reminding individuals of their action plans are not more effective than an intervention without text messages, although there seems to be a beneficial effect on self-efficacy, which might facilitate behavior change in the long-term. Challenging aspects of the research design (e.g., reactivity of the assessment protocol) are discussed and suggestions for future research are highlighted.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2012 · Frontiers in Psychology
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