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The Search for Emerging Decolonizing Methodologies in Qualitative Research: Further Strategies for Liberatory and Democratic Inquiry

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Many non-Western and non-English-speaking scholars express the need for supporting a methodological approach that foregrounds the voices of nationals and locals (or indigenous peoples). Supporting this stance, Western scholars will reach out in democratic and liberatory ways that effect research collaboration, helping to foster social justice and locally desired change. This article supports this search via presenting some methodological strategies culled from six different cases of cross-cultural and cross-language research in which both Western and non-Western scholars were involved and/or collaborated. A comparative study of the inquiries themselves, with follow-up interviews with their U.S.-based authors, is the strategy that has been chosen to respond to this search for additional, emerging methodological and narrative approaches to cross-cultural/cross-national research that is useful to both local and Western scholars equally.
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... For example, partnering with local or native collaborators to highlight cultural practices that meet the needs of the situated population during all stages of cross-cultural research, from conception to dissemination, furthers the creation of research processes and implementation of methodologies that honor the Indigenous culture. This includes, but is not limited to, developing cultural advisory boards and research teams comprised of members of the studied community, as well as privileging insider voices through conducting pilot studies and Indigenous data analysis that assess for community needs, cultural understandings, and historical knowledges (Lincoln & González y González, 2008;Seponski et al., 2020). Lincoln and González y González (2008) also promoted engaging in cross-cultural research in the community's native language, liberating the research process from the conventions and standards of the English language promoted in many Western contexts that may lead to misrepresentations of the findings, and therefore implications, of the research. ...
... This includes, but is not limited to, developing cultural advisory boards and research teams comprised of members of the studied community, as well as privileging insider voices through conducting pilot studies and Indigenous data analysis that assess for community needs, cultural understandings, and historical knowledges (Lincoln & González y González, 2008;Seponski et al., 2020). Lincoln and González y González (2008) also promoted engaging in cross-cultural research in the community's native language, liberating the research process from the conventions and standards of the English language promoted in many Western contexts that may lead to misrepresentations of the findings, and therefore implications, of the research. ...
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... Second, a follow-up interview made us more aware of the linguistic component of our interview protocol; language that appears neutral may sound formal and distant as opposed to language that recognizes the historical and material conditions of its audience. There are many studies that have examined the use of language and power in research methods and have valorized the agency in language practices of transnational communities (Campano et al., 2016;Janks, 2010;Lincoln et al., 2008;McKinney, 2017;Motha, 2014). These works framed our understanding of linguistic ideologies inherent in postcolonial settings. ...
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