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Challenges and Possibilities for Serving Gifted Learners in the Regular Classroom

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Abstract

This article addresses the major obstacles that impede educators in differentiating for gifted learners in the regular classroom. Specific discussion of the lack of subject matter knowledge, the lack of classroom management skills, teachers' attitudes and beliefs about learning, lack of knowledge for modifying the curriculum, issues regarding responding to diverse populations, difficulties of effective use and location of resources, lack of planning time, lack of administrative support, and lack of relevant pedagogical skills is provided. Strategies for recognizing and overcoming the obstacles are embedded within the discussion of each. Finally, important general considerations for facilitating the use of differentiation in classrooms are discussed, includ ing the use of diagnostic-prescriptive learning, modulating teaching and learning expectations, and flexibility of curriculum and teacher beliefs surrounding student learning.

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... Hızlı öğrenebilme kapasitesine sahip oldukları için bu ihtiyaçlarının karşılanması gerekmektedir (Şahin, 2015). İhtiyaçları yönünde normal öğretim programının ilerisinde bilgi ve becerilerden beslenmek isterler (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). Özel yetenekli öğrencilere yönelik eğitimin etkili olması için eğitimin esnek yapısının olması gereklidir. ...
... Özel yetenekli öğrencilerin zorlayıcı ve karmaşık öğrenme ihtiyaçları son derece önemlidir. Bu ihtiyaçların karşılanması için kendilerine özgü programlara ve eğitim ortamlarına ihtiyaç duyarlar (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). Programlar ve öğrenme ortamları günümüz özelliklerine göre güncellenmektedir (Feldhusen vd., 1989). ...
... Since gifted students have the capacity to learn quickly, their needs must be met (Şahin, 2015). Gifted students need knowledge and skills beyond the general curriculum (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). Gifted education should be flexible in order to more effective. ...
Article
Introduction: Gifted students carry out activities that shape the society to which they belong with their creative and innovative thoughts. The most important of the mentioned studies are the projects for the solution to the problems that concern people globally. In this study, the changes in the skills of students who are identified as gifted to the project-based virtual learning were investigated. Virtual project-based differentiated curriculum education is effective on students' project-based virtual learning qualifications or not is the aim of the research. Method: It is a longitudinal study in a semi-experimental model in terms of method. Within the scope of the study, the Project-Based Virtual Learning Qualifications Scale was applied to 17 middle school education students between 2013 and 2019 at 3-year intervals, and the data were gathered and analyzed. Findings: In this study, dependent variable is Project-Based Virtual Learning Qualifications (PBVLQ) scores, independent variable is being attained with project based virtual learning education. According to analysis results, it was found that there are positive changes in the project-based virtual learning skills of the students. Discussion: Based on these results, suggestions were made to improve the project-based virtual learning skills of gifted students
... Differentiation is integral in meeting the learning needs of gifted or talented students, who possess different abilities and talents. Their educational needs can be appropriately satisfied with accelerated, compacted, and advanced content, as well as enriched learning experiences, which facilitate the development of convergent and creative thinking abilities while encouraging the pursuit of loftier goals and independence (Feldhusen, 1982;Griggs & Dunn, 1984;Tomlinson, 1994;VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). ...
... One of the biggest challenges is related to teachers' subject knowledge and professionalism. For instance, VanTassel- Baska and Stambaugh (2005) argue that teachers' lack of content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and skills, and classroom management skills significantly hinder their ability to implement differentiated teaching. Other factors impacting the success of differentiated learning include a poor understanding of how to accommodate approaches to learning for gifted students, as well as ineffective use of resources (Wan, 2017). ...
... Another obstacle to differentiated instruction is insufficient time, administrative support, and resources (Tomlinson & Allan, 2000;VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005;Wan, 2017). Indeed, without sufficient time and resources to adapt the curriculum, instruction, and assessment, teachers "may feel frustrated and overwhelmed by the idea of meeting the needs of gifted learners" (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005, p. 215). ...
Article
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Purpose This study explores the contributions and effectiveness of the Jockey Club “Giftedness into Flourishing Talents” Project (Project GIFT) in supporting learner diversity in gifted education, including meeting the educational and psychological needs of highly capable and gifted students in Hong Kong. Design/Approach/Methods This study investigates the effectiveness of Project GIFT in supporting the development of diversity in learning in 20 project schools. Through close cooperation with project schools, Project GIFT comprised six developmental areas: school development, curriculum development, teachers’ professional development, parent empowerment, student development, and financial support. To further assess the usefulness of the school-based support provided by Project GIFT, this study examines the implementation of school-based gifted education in two project schools based on the aforementioned components. Findings This study reveals Project GIFT’s significant role in promoting school-based gifted education in Hong Kong schools. Indeed, it was the first cross-institutional and research-based educational program in gifted education that intervened at both Level 1 (whole class) and Level 2 (pullout) of the three-tiered policy stipulated by the Hong Kong Education Bureau. One of the few gifted education programs implemented in Asia, Project GIFT focused on six key components to specifically support high-ability and gifted students with diverse educational and affective needs. This study shows that Project GIFT significantly enhanced diversity in learning, its collaboration with two key schools resulting in the successful enhancement of school development, professional development, curriculum development, student development, parent empowerment, and financial support. Originality/Value The article fills the research gap by examining the effectiveness of a school-based gifted education program focused on enriching and differentiating curricula for different regular and pull-out programs. In doing so, this article attests to the success of the program in addressing the educational and psychosocial needs of gifted students at local schools in Hong Kong.
... Hızlı öğrenebilme kapasitesine sahip oldukları için bu ihtiyaçlarının karşılanması gerekmektedir (Şahin, 2015). İhtiyaçları yönünde normal öğretim programının ilerisinde bilgi ve becerilerden beslenmek isterler (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). Özel yetenekli öğrencilere yönelik eğitimin etkili olması için eğitimin esnek yapısının olması gereklidir. ...
... Özel yetenekli öğrencilerin zorlayıcı ve karmaşık öğrenme ihtiyaçları son derece önemlidir. Bu ihtiyaçların karşılanması için kendilerine özgü programlara ve eğitim ortamlarına ihtiyaç duyarlar (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). Programlar ve öğrenme ortamları günümüz özelliklerine göre güncellenmektedir (Feldhusen vd., 1989). ...
... Since gifted students have the capacity to learn quickly, their needs must be met (Şahin, 2015). Gifted students need knowledge and skills beyond the general curriculum (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). Gifted education should be flexible in order to more effective. ...
... The first stage, introduction to inclusion of the gifted, included basics of the domain and vocational principles competency areas. The competencies under the basics of the domain competency area are generally supported by a number of previous research (Akar & Sengil-Akar, 2012;Akar & Uluman, 2013;Gokdere & Ayvacı, 2004;Hultgren & Seeley, 1982;Karnes, et al., 2000;Mosse, 2003;Neumeister, et al., 2007;Ray, 2009;Rohrer, 1995;Seeley, 1998;Schack & Starko, 1990;VanTassel-Baska & Johnsen, 2007;VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). These studies have mentioned issues related to teachers of the gifted such as; having limited knowledge about being gifted and associating giftedness with being successful in courses, having limited knowledge about conceptions and definitions of giftedness and characteristics of gifted students. ...
... The second stage, before the inclusion of the gifted, included cooperation and support, precautions and arrangements, planning and programing competency areas. Competencies under cooperation and support competency area are grounded by different research (Akar, 2010;Blumen-Pardo, 2002;Darga, 2010;Tekbas, 2004;Mosse, 2003;VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005;VanTassel-Baska & Johnsen, 2007). In brief, those research findings have pointed out issues such as gifted students' over attendance to pull-out programs which may likely lead dropouts unless a unique cooperation and ties exist between school and program and parents of the gifteds' concerns and needs about supporting their child. ...
... Planning and programing competency area's competencies are also in line with previous research (Eakin, 2007;Hultgren & Seeley, 1982;Johnsen et. al., 2002;;Ray, 2009;Seeley, 1998VanTassel-Baska & Johnsen, 2007VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005) regarding on the necessity of assessing the gifted from his/her superior and weak aspects to gather critical information about the student, possessing skills about determining student's needs in advance, having theoretical knowledge about evidence based teaching models in teaching the gifted, becoming a facilitator for independent research and promoting study skills, fostering creative problem solving and individualized teaching techniques, competence to apply enrichment in students' program, cognitive teaching at a quite high level, effective teaching and learning strategies with applying advanced level thinking and metacognition models and, teaching creativity in problem solving, competence to apply differentiation strategies in the curriculum, competence to teaching and learning towards the gifted and lack of time for individual planning to provide course of action for teaching the gifted in the regular classroom. ...
Article
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Purpose: The purpose of this research was to research and reveal the competencies for classroom teachers to support gifted students in the regular classrooms. Design/Methodology/Approach: In order to achieve this purpose, researcher conducted a case study and an action research of the qualitative research design, respectively. Participants of the study were five classroom teachers, their gifted students, parents of the gifted students, other classroom teachers, elementary school teachers and school administrators. Data were collected through unstructured interviews, observations, focus group interviews, documents and products during both the case study and action research. Roughly, 44 hours of interviews and 70 course hours of observations were carried out; and 311 documents and/or products obtained. Content and descriptive analysis were run to analyze the data. Inter-coder reliability coefficient was found to be .78. Findings: Overall analysis revealed thirty-four competencies under eight different competency areas on four different stages. The first stage, “Introduction to Inclusion of the Gifted”, comprised of “Basics of the Domain” and “Vocational Principles” competency areas including five and four competencies, respectively. The second stage, “Before the Inclusion of the Gifted”, comprised of “Cooperation and Support”, “Precautions and Arrangements” and “Planning and Programming” competency areas including five, three and four competencies, respectively. The third stage, “During the Inclusion of the Gifted”, comprised of “Management and Climate of Inclusion Classroom” and “Implementation and Evaluation of Inclusion Program” competency areas including three and seven competencies, respectively. The fourth stage, “After the Inclusion of the Gifted”, comprised of only one competency area labeled as “Maintainability” including three competencies. Highlights: Gaining the competencies, revealed in this research study, to classroom teachers who will support gifted students with inclusion practices in regular classrooms by discovering and developing students' different talents is of critical importance in terms of meeting the educational needs of gifted students in regular education environments.
... Kjo karakteristikë e mësimit online është vërtetuar se e bën këtë format tejet të dëshirueshëm për grupe të ndryshme nxënësish, të cilët kanë nevoja të llojllojshme, që nuk plotësohen në klasat e rregullta (Gilbert, 2015). Në këtë grup hyjnë edhe nxënësit me dhunti (Tomlinson, 2000), për të cilët diferencimi i kurrikulës dhe praktikave mësimore është i domosdoshëm, në mënyrë që të adresohen nevojat e tyre akademike (VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh 2005). ...
... , përveçse ka shkaktuar krizë globale e shëndetit publik (World Health Organization, 2020), është dëshmuar të ketë paraqitur sfida për sistemet arsimore në mbarë botën duke ngritur kështu shqetësime rreth çështjes së mundësive të barabarta për të gjithë nxënësit (Hyseni-Duraku dhe Nagavci 2020). Përshtatja e mësimit për nevojat individuale të nxënësve me dhunti, diferencimi i plan-programit, krahas ofrimit të mbështetjes së vazhdueshme për nxënësit, konsiderohen të domosdoshme për t'u mundësuar nxënësve me dhunti arritjen e potencialit të plotë dhe përmbushjen e nevojave akademike (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). ...
Preprint
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Ky kapitull prezanton gjetjet e studimit i cili kishte për synim të hulumtonte ndikimin e COVID-19 dhe mbylljes së shkollave në mirëqenien e nxënësve me dhunti dhe qëndrimet rreth mësimit në distancë (online). Ndikimi i rrethanave të shkaktuara nga COVID-19 tek prindërit e fëmijëve me dhunti janë hulumtuar gjithashtu përgjatë këtij studimi. Janë realizuar intervista gjysmë të strukturuara me (n=20) nxënës me dhunti dhe (n=10) prindër të nxënësve me dhunti. Gjetjet nga ky studim tregojnë se si rezultat i mbylljes së shkollave dhe izolimit në shtëpi, prindërit e fëmijëve me dhunti janë ndjerë më të ngarkuar se zakonisht, dhe se në familje është rritur tensioni. Në anën tjetër, te fëmijët me dhunti janë vërejtur ndryshime në mirëqenien psikologjike. COVID-19 u ka prishur rutinën këtyre fëmijëve, u ka penguar lëvizjen e lirë, i ka bërë të ndjehen se nuk janë duke bërë gjëra me vlerë, si dhe u ka shkaktuar një sërë ndjenjash e pasojash negative, si: çrregullim të gjumit, mërzi, vetmi, trishtim, zemërim, ndjenjë të të qenit të pafuqishëm, pikëllim, mungesë motivimi, dhe përtaci. Nxënësit, po ashtu, kanë shprehur se kanë qëndrim negativ ndaj mësimit online dhe e kanë cilësuar si të papërshtatshëm dhe joefikas, me pak mundësi për ndërveprim e diskutime. Kapitulli gjithashtu përmban sugjerime praktike rreth përkrahjes së nevojshme, në mënyrë që nxënësit me dhunti të arrijnë potencialin e tyre në rrethana të tilla të pandemisë, në rrethana të tjera të ngjashme dhe pas rrikthimit në shkollë.
... Kjo karakteristikë e mësimit online është vërtetuar se e bën këtë format tejet të dëshirueshëm për grupe të ndryshme nxënësish, të cilët kanë nevoja të llojllojshme, që nuk plotësohen në klasat e rregullta (Gilbert, 2015). Në këtë grup hyjnë edhe nxënësit me dhunti (Tomlinson, 2000), për të cilët diferencimi i kurrikulës dhe praktikave mësimore është i domosdoshëm, në mënyrë që të adresohen nevojat e tyre akademike (VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh 2005). ...
... , përveçse ka shkaktuar krizë globale e shëndetit publik (World Health Organization, 2020), është dëshmuar të ketë paraqitur sfida për sistemet arsimore në mbarë botën duke ngritur kështu shqetësime rreth çështjes së mundësive të barabarta për të gjithë nxënësit (Hyseni-Duraku dhe Nagavci 2020). Përshtatja e mësimit për nevojat individuale të nxënësve me dhunti, diferencimi i plan-programit, krahas ofrimit të mbështetjes së vazhdueshme për nxënësit, konsiderohen të domosdoshme për t'u mundësuar nxënësve me dhunti arritjen e potencialit të plotë dhe përmbushjen e nevojave akademike (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). ...
Book
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Ndikimi i pandemisë COVID-19 në arsim dhe mirëqenie shqyrton ndikimin e masave të pandemisë COVID-19 në mirëqenien dhe arsimin e nxënësve të arsimit parauniversitar dhe të studentëve të arsimit të lartë, si dhe punën e mësimdhënësve të rregullt dhe të stafit mbështetës. Për më tepër, libri siguron prova të hollësishme të ndryshimeve të shkaktuara nga distancimi fizik, mbyllja e shkollave dhe karantina në angazhimet e prindër-fëmijë me theks ndikimin e ngjarjeve të mëparshme stresuese të jetës në stresin e prindërve dhe praktikat e prindërimit gjatë periudhës pandemike. Kjo punë ka për qëllim ta avancojë kërkimin dhe ta përmirësojë praktikën aktuale në mënyrë që mësimdhënësit dhe punonjësit e shëndetit mendor të mund të planifikojnë nivele të përshtatshme të mbështetjes dhe ndërhyrjes si gjatë një pandemie ashtu edhe pas saj.
... For example, some teachers think differentiation can be implemented by merely grouping students in ability groups, whereas others experience differentiation as difficult because they perceive it as individualised instruction. Such issues are also evident in research findings suggesting that the majority of teachers does not effectively differentiate in their teaching (Doolaard and Oudbier 2010;Eysink, Hulsbeek, and Gijlers 2017;Reis and Renzulli 2010;Suprayogi, Valcke, and Godwin 2017), and that they experience difficulties in tailoring their instruction to the students' needs (VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh 2005). In addition, both fields are generally regarded as separate; they use their own terminology, frameworks, and cycles of teacher activities, and are presented to teachers as distinct ways to enhance the quality of their education. ...
... Literature in the differentiation field provides many concrete suggestions for how this can be done (see, e.g. Eysink, Hulsbeek, and Gijlers 2017;Lou et al. 1996;Tomlinson 1996;Tomlinson et al. 2003;van Geel et al. 2019;VanTassel-Baska and Little 2003;VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh 2005;Webb, Nemer, and Zuniga 2002). ...
Article
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Background: To enable all students to reach their full potential, teachers have to adapt their instruction to students’ varying needs. In order to do this, teachers need to engage in activities associated with formative assessment, as well as those associated with differentiation. However, both of these types of activities are, in themselves, difficult for teachers to carry out. Furthermore, as both fields tend to use their own terminology, frameworks, and cycles of teacher activities, it can be even more difficult for teachers to navigate both. Although the notion of the strong relationship between formative assessment and differentiation is not new, we argue that a better understanding of the close relationship between the two is needed in the context of teacher education. Purpose: Our aim was to develop a conceptual framework which offers teachers and teacher educators a coherent set of teacher activities in which both formative assessment and differentiation are represented. Sources of evidence: International literature in the fields of formative assessment and differentiation was reviewed. Through this process, we sought to identify, describe and compare teacher activities regarded as crucial for formative assessment and for differentiation. The review was based on extant review studies and frameworks used in both fields and handbooks on both topics. Main argument: Our analysis demonstrated that both approaches have much in common, but differ substantially in terms of the emphasis placed on different activities and the depth of elaboration. As such, we argue that the approaches complement each other well and that it is feasible to present teachers with one coherent set of teacher activities in which both approaches are unified. We propose a conceptual framework for Assessment-Informed Differentiation (AID), which involves a continual cycle of in-depth activities related to preparing and providing differentiated instruction based on assessment data. Conclusion: Formative assessment and differentiation approaches need to be treated as an integrated set of activities in order to realise the full potential of all students. Further research should focus on the usability and effectiveness of the proposed cycle. The conceptual framework we propose could ultimately be used in many different teacher education settings internationally, forming a starting point for much-needed teacher professional development in this area.
... This feature of online learning has been proven to make this format highly desirable for different groups of students, who have diverse needs that are not met in regular classes (Gilbert, 2015). This group also includes gifted students (Tomlinson, 2000), for whom differentiation of curricula and teaching practices is necessary in order to address their academic needs (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). ...
... , in addition to causing a global public health crisis (World Health Organization, 2020), has proven to pose challenges to education systems worldwide, thus raising concerns about the issue of equal opportunities for all students (Hyseni-Duraku & Nagavci, 2020). Adapting teaching to the individual needs of gifted students, curriculum differentiation, in addition to providing ongoing support to students, are considered necessary to enable gifted students to reach their full potential and meet their academic needs (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). ...
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Chapter Summary: This chapter presents the findings of a study that aimed to investigate the impact of COVID-19 and school closures on gifted students’ well-being and attitudes about distance learning (online). The impact of COVID-19-induced circumstances on parents of gifted children has also been investigated throughout this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with (n = 20) gifted students and (n = 10) parents of gifted students. Findings from this study show that as a result of school closures and isolation at home, parents of gifted children felt more burdened than usual, and that tension in the family increased. On the other hand, changes in psychological well-being have been observed in gifted children. COVID-19 has disrupted the routine of these children, hindered their free movement, made them feel that they are not doing anything valuable, and caused them a series of negative feelings and outcomes, such as: sleep disorder, boredom loneliness, sadness, anger, feelings of helplessness, grief, lack of motivation, and laziness. Students also expressed that they had a negative attitude towards online learning and described it as inappropriate and inefficient, with few opportunities for interaction and discussion. The chapter also contains practical suggestions about the support needed so that gifted students can reach their full potential in such pandemic circumstances, in other similar circumstances, and after returning to school.
... This feature of online learning has been proven to make this format highly desirable for different groups of students, who have diverse needs that are not met in regular classes (Gilbert, 2015). This group also includes gifted students (Tomlinson, 2000), for whom differentiation of curricula and teaching practices is necessary in order to address their academic needs (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). ...
... , in addition to causing a global public health crisis (World Health Organization, 2020), has proven to pose challenges to education systems worldwide, thus raising concerns about the issue of equal opportunities for all students (Hyseni-Duraku & Nagavci, 2020). Adapting teaching to the individual needs of gifted students, curriculum differentiation, in addition to providing ongoing support to students, are considered necessary to enable gifted students to reach their full potential and meet their academic needs (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). ...
Book
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Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Education and Wellbeing book explores the impact of COVID-19 pandemic measures on the wellbeing and education of pre-university and higher education students, and the work of mainstream teachers and support staff. Furthermore, it provides detailed evidence of changes caused by physical isolation, school closure, and quarantine on parental-child engagements by emphasizing the impact of previous stressful life events on parenting stress and parenting practices during the pandemic period. This work is intended to advance research and improve current practice so that educators and mental health workers may plan appropriate levels of support and intervention both during and after a pandemic.
... Utilizing differentiation in the heterogeneous, mixed ability classroom may be one way to reach gifted students. While differentiation of instruction and assessment can provide benefit to the diversity of students within a classroom, there are challenges in working with gifted students (e.g., lack of subject knowledge, classroom management, attitudes and beliefs) (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). For example, Hansen and Feldhusen (1994) argued many teachers feel threatened by the intellectual abilities of gifted students, and therefore "fall short of a reasonable standard for teaching gifted students" (p. ...
... Providing challenging curriculum for gifted students was the largest identified need. Teachers need advanced content knowledge to accelerate gifted students beyond what is traditionally covered in the classroom (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). Differentiating instruction for gifted students in agriculture classes is the second highest need. ...
Article
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Agriculture teachers are responsible for the education of a mixed ability classroom, in which there may be students identified as gifted. It is unclear how much preservice preparation agriculture teachers receive in order to challenge this population of students or what inservice teacher professional development needs exist. This study aimed to measure agriculture teacher attitudes toward working with gifted students as well as their preservice teacher preparation and current professional development needs. Just over half of participants that completed a traditional teacher preparation program felt adequately prepared to meet the needs of gifted students in their classrooms. Agriculture teachers mostly agreed that students should be challenged, gifted students are a valuable part of their classroom, and that differentiating for gifted students is important. Responding teachers mostly disagreed that their content knowledge is challenged, gifted students are bored in their classrooms, and that they feel threatened by the intelligence of gifted students in their class. Professional development is needed in creating challenging classroom content, differentiating instruction and teaching problem-solving skills to gifted agriculture students.
... Grouping learners with their intellectual and developmental peers within the classroom is intended to be a useful strategy for gifted and talented learners and has been recommended by several scholars (VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh, 2005). However, it sometimes meets opposition from parents who object to the singling out of students in terms of their abilities. ...
... VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh explain that pre-assessing a learners' level of the content knowledge at a given grade can help teachers know in advance how to adjust the curriculum to the needs of these learners. They explain that teachers should prepare selected problems from textbooks, chapters, reading comprehension assessments, and that, in each of the content areas, learners who score 85% or higher will need compressed instruction that is substituted with more advanced tasks and work in the given area (VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh, 2005). Even if this preassessment is not carried out, teachers must observe the pace student learning throughout the school year and adjust the curriculum and the level of content knowledge and task complexity accordingly. ...
... The first step in evaluating a school's capacity to provide learning opportunities for gifted and talented students is for the school leadership to identify what teachers know about gifted learning and teaching, how they cater for gifted and talented students, and what they need to learn about it (Munro, 2017). Teachers may need up-skilling to identify how these students know and think in the classroom and to modify their teaching and curriculum provision (VanTassel-Baska, & Stambaugh, 2005). At [INSERT name of school], our school leadership will consider what our teachers know about gifted learning and teaching and will focus on opportunities to develop staff professional knowledge and classroom practice (Munro, 2017). ...
Book
Building Better Schools with Evidence-based Policy: Adaptable Policy for Teachers and School Leaders provides an extensive set of free-to-use policies for building better schools. The policies included in this book cover a broad range of popular topics for schools that are not readily accessible, and each policy is built on theory, driven by research, and created by and experts. Each policy is based on substantial evidence and this is ensured through the inclusion of contributors who are active and highly reputable in their respective field. Most schools are obliged to write and maintain policy and not all school leaders have the required skills, time or expertise to do this effectively. Building Better Schools with Evidence-based Policy: Adaptable Policy for Teachers and School Leaders is a time-saving resource for schools. It aims to address the reported research to practice gap in education by delivering accessible evidence-based practice in a ready-to-use adaptable format. All policies within this book are designed to be adapted and tailored to the unique diversity and needs of each school as reflected by the context and the people that make up the school community. This book is relevant to every person who works in a school - worldwide. Users of this book can rest assured that each policy has been carefully formulated from the current understandings of best practice. This is a practical innovation and an example of how schools can use research-evidence in their day-to-day practices. Download here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/oa-edit/10.4324/9781003025955/building-better-schools-evidence-based-policy-kelly-ann-allen-andrea-reupert-lindsay-oades?refId=632274ab-eee7-4293-bb4a-6c1366715472
... There are several points worth discussing in teaching in inclusive settings. The teachers reported a possible decrease in teaching time to be devoted to other students and the existence of behavior problems in the classrooms as main concerns (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). Although the teachers in this study shared similar concerns prior to intervention, they reported that they did not have any problems in terms of distributing teaching time across students and behavior management problems in their classes at the end. ...
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We examined effects of hybrid coaching delivered face-to-face and via smartphone to train middle school general educators to use a simultaneous prompting procedure during instruction on academic core content with sixth-grade students with intellectual disability in general education classrooms. We also measured student outcomes. We used a multiple probe design across four student-teacher dyads in the study. Teachers acquired the steps of simultaneous prompting procedure with 100% accuracy , maintained the use of the prompting procedure over time, and generalized prompting for teaching new academic content to their students. Students acquired their targeted academic content, maintained the skills over time, and generalized the skills across different persons and settings. The results showed a functional relation of the intervention on the dependent variables. Social validity data collected from teachers and students were positive. Future research needs and implications of the findings are discussed.
... In addition, the teachers of the gifted mentioned the theme of self-confidence as a disadvantage more than did the teachers of students with disabilities. VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh (2005) stated that although content knowledge of teachers has been important for all students, it becomes critical when working with gifted students. Since the teachers of gifted students keep questioning themselves about their knowledge of the content when working with gifted students, it might consequently lead to the teachers' lower self-confidence in their abilities. ...
... Since schools and sports are two contexts in which a great number of children and adolescents participate, it comes as no surprise that many socalled talent programs have emerged here (Burgess & Naughton, 2010;Gilson, 2009;Johnston, Wattie, Schorer, & Baker, 2018;Till & Baker, 2020;VanTassel-Baska & Brown, 2007;VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). It can be argued that cross-pollination of the experiences gained in current approaches in talent programs (e.g. ...
Article
This literature review provides an overview of the various modern approaches in talent programs for the context of schools and sports reported in scientific journals (2009–2019) and presents their similarities and differences and options for cross-pollination between contexts. This is a first attempt to overarch contexts regarding talent identification and development. Searches in 12 databases yielded 31 studies. Similarities and differences between contexts were distilled through a qualitative content analysis and described for the identification of talent and talent development. Based on these results, it is suggested that school contexts might benefit from including a talent transfer pathway, differentiating for maturity-level and sex, emphasizing on deliberate practice, monitoring load-ability, and applying acceleration, which are proposed approaches in the sport context. Furthermore, several approaches from the school context could enhance talent programs in sport, including universal screening, paying attention to underserved populations, focusing on creativity and enrichment as well as enhancing the accountability and education level of trainers/coaches. Future studies need to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of approaches in practice. Moreover, the search could be expanded to other countries to establish a more global view while examining national patterns regarding policy and funding contexts in which programs are located.
... The purpose of designing this module was to allow prospective classroom teachers to get information about different methods and techniques that can be used in gifted/talented education, and to help them develop their content knowledge on science. Based on a literature review (Tomlinson 2004;Renzulli, 2012;Freeman, 2012;VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh, 2005;Nielsen and Kudson, 1992), the theoretical framework was formed while designing DSET. Following this, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 5 classroom teachers who had gifted/talented students in their classrooms. ...
... The first step in evaluating a school's capacity to provide learning opportunities for gifted and talented students is for the school leadership to identify what teachers know about gifted learning and teaching, how they cater for gifted and talented students, and what they need to learn about it (Munro, 2017). Teachers may need up-skilling to identify how these students know and think in the classroom and to modify their teaching and curriculum provision (VanTassel-Baska, & Stambaugh, 2005). At [INSERT name of school], our school leadership will consider what our teachers know about gifted learning and teaching and will focus on opportunities to develop staff professional knowledge and classroom practice (Munro, 2017). ...
... While research indicates teachers have varying views of gifted students Carman, 2011;Greake & Gross, 2008;, the predominate perspective is that gifted students are social misfits, antisocial leaders, and possess high cognitive abilities (Geake & Gross, 2008). Related to the perception teachers hold of gifted students, literature suggests teaching gifted students can be challenging, especially when student needs go unmet (Clark, 2013;VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). Beyond differentiating instruction, common teaching strategies and characteristics used to meet the needs of gifted students include using advanced curriculum, encouraging critical thinking, providing opportunities for problem solving, using project and problem-based learning, and allowing for student autonomy (Gentry et al., 2007;VanTassel-Baska & Hubbard, 2016). ...
... The key to implementing this is a flexible classroom environment. Teachers may be reluctant to differentiate due to fear of straying from the mandated curriculum, which could result in lower standardized test scores for some students (VanTassel-Baska, 2006;VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). Other researchers suggest that teachers may experience a lack of time to plan for differentiation (Hertberg- Davis & Brighton, 2006;Knopper & Fertig, 2005) and/or lack of administrative support (Hertberg- Davis & Brighton, 2006). ...
... 243); thus, the school counselor can tactfully address commonly-held stereotypes regarding GT learners. Additionally, the increasing demands placed on teachers often result in gifted students being overlooked, resulting in classroom experiences incongruent with gifted students' academic needs (VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh 2005). This lack of stimulation can beget amotivation and disinterest, even at the elementary level, possibly manifesting into a barrier related to CCR. ...
Article
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Rural school communities face an array of systemic barriers that often impact students’ college and career readiness (CCR). These barriers often extend to students identified as gifted and talented, a subsection with differing CCR readiness needs than their non-gifted peers. Despite these barriers, school counselors are well positioned to address the career development needs of all students. Regrettably, elementary-level CCR, particularly within the rural context, is often overlooked in educational research. In response to this gap, this article highlights strategies school counselors in rural settings can employ to support the CCR needs of elementary-level gifted learners, conceptualized within the framework of the American School Counselor Association National Model.
... • accelerated-the learning should move at a faster pace than other groups • deep and complex-the learning should allow for conceptual connections • challenging-the learning should match what the students need and are able to do • creative-the learning should involve projects that require synthesis and result in new creation (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006 ...
... The existing literature on the education of gifted and talented students is extensive and suggests that teacher training and professional development enable teachers to foster high-quality education, increase students' achievement and provide students with the right challenging opportunities to reach their full potential (Ayers, Sawyer, & Dinham, 2004;Fraser-Seeto, 2013;Garrett, Rubie-Davies, Alansari, Peterson, & Flint, 2015;Hansen & Feldhusen, 1994;Laine & Tirri, 2016;Little, 2018;Stephens, 2018;Vialle & Rogers, 2012;VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005;Whitlock & DuCette, 1989). To achieve this, educators need to be equipped with the skills and knowledge of the latest research on what works best for gifted students, together with examples of effective practice in the field (VanTassel-Baska, Bracken, Feng, & Brown, 2009). ...
... Failing to take into account differences among students could hinder student learning (Belfi et al., 2012). Therefore, teachers are expected to use differentiated instructional strategies to meet the needs of all students in their classrooms (Belfi et al., 2012;Tomlinson, 2014;VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). Currently, there are few psychometrically sound self-assessment instruments available to assess differentiated classroom instructional strategies as a function of achievement level. ...
Article
We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Classroom Practices Survey–Revised (CPS-R) when used with students achieving at low, average, and high levels. A total of 739 teachers completed CPS-R for students in their classrooms. Results showed improvement in the reliability of CPS-R across all achievement levels when compared with its previous version. Internal consistency estimates for the four factors were higher for the high-achieving students (α = .84–.94) compared with estimates for students who achieve at average (α = .83–.92) and low (α = .81–.90) levels. Model fit of the data was in the acceptable range across all achievement levels. However, model fit indices for the high-achieving group were slightly better than for the average- and low-achieving groups. Results support the practical value of CPS-R as a tool to assess teachers’ use of differentiation strategies.
... It can be related to students' activities of conducting a self-study, such as assignments and independent projects. The important role of teachers is to support and encourage students' independence and self-expression in their learning, adopting teacher competencies to work with children with special needs and helping students withspecialneeds(KudekMirošević2018).However,teachersmustalsoworkwith gifted students (VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh 2005;Schroth and Helfer 2008). ...
Article
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This study primarily explored student teachers’ classroom management orientations, their beliefs regarding effective research-based teaching behaviours and the correlation of these variables. A sample of 238 future teacher students was considered. The results indicated that high-quality classroom management orientations correlated with students’ positive beliefs regarding research-based effective teaching behaviours. The obtained results emphasised the importance of developing adequate attitudes of future teachers towards classroom management styles and effective teaching behaviours, which could significantly impact their teaching practices and the success of their future students’ learning.
... Understanding students' individual personal and instructional needs while fostering interest and ability is a significant contributor to student success (Bates et al., 2016;Sparks, 2019). Teachers of advanced learners may struggle with a lack of support, knowledge, and resources that are required to educate this population of students (Dimitriadis, 2016;VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2012). For Tennessee, 85% of school funding is tied to performance outcomes, including the number of students completing courses, credentials, and degrees (Pratt, 2017). ...
Article
Guided by the theory of differentiated instruction, this quantitative study evaluated the effectiveness of Achieve 3000, a technology-enhanced program for differentiating reading instruction. Achieve 3000 was fully implemented with fidelity in a local middle school that has a large percentage of advanced learners. Archived reading scores of 120 advanced Grade 6–8 students were compared pre- and postimplementation of Achieve 3000. A paired-samples t test examining the overall effect of the intervention indicated that students’ posttest LevelSet Lexile reading scores were significantly higher than their pretest scores. A mixed-design analysis of variance was used to examine the main and interaction effects of time (pretest vs. posttest) and grade level (Grades 6–8) on students’ LevelSet Lexile reading scores. A significant main effect of grade level and a significant time by grade interaction were present with Grade 6 advanced learners showing significantly greater increases in LevelSet Lexile reading scores following the Achieve 3000 intervention as compared to the other grade levels. These findings suggest that the Achieve 3000 program was effective for meeting the specialized differentiated instructional needs of advanced learners in reading. The implications for social change include offering educators viable, technology-enhanced options for effectively differentiating reading instruction for advanced learners resulting in enhanced academic achievement, thereby benefiting students and the school community.
... Dit is zichtbaar in Nederland (zie bijvoorbeeld https://cbo-nijmegen.nl/), maar ook daarbuiten. [10][11] Hierbij gaat het om het herkennen en begeleiden van kinderen die uitzonderlijke prestaties laten zien op schoolgerelateerde taken/vakken. Net als in de sportcontext blijkt het een uitdaging om talent te herkennen en onderpresteren en/of uitval te voorkomen. ...
Article
Nederland hoort tijdens deze Olympische zomer bij de top 10 van de wereld. De medaillespiegel zet TeamNL op een prachtige zevende plaats. Handhaving van een plek in de mondiale top 10 vereist echter structurele aandacht voor het opleiden van jonge sporters. De continue veranderingen in de sportwereld vragen dus om een verdere optimalisatie van de opleidingstrajecten. Gelukkig is, zeker ook buiten de sportcontext, veel kennis en ervaring aanwezig waar we ons voordeel mee kunnen doen. Wat kunnen we leren door eens grensoverstijgend te kijken naar talentontwikkeling? Dit artikel zet op een rijtje welke lessen een ander domein van talentontwikkeling, namelijk het onderwijs, de sport te bieden heeft.
... the curricula at primary level are intended to prepare youngsters for the higher level of education, the importance of teacher awareness of gifted children and the methods to help them in learning seems to be missing and neglected in Tanzania. Westberg and Daoust, [17], Van Tassel-Baska and Stambaugh, [18] pointed that, reasonably few teachers are modifying their instructions for gifted children in regular classroom.We may know that, Tanzania like many other countries has been enrolling many children in schools. These children come from various background seem to not be recognized as gifted. ...
Article
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Background: Gifted Children are among learners who have potentials to show a higher performance in comparison with other students in term of skills. Objectives: This study investigates teachers' awareness of gifted children and availability of learning resources to meet learning needs of children identified as gifted in public primary schools in Tanzania taking a case of Tabora municipality. The study was guided by the following objectives. To determine the level of teachers' awareness of gifted children among pupils in government primary school in Tabora. To explore the role of teachers trained in special education in government primary school in Tanzania. To examine strategies used by teachers in teaching gifted children in government primary schools in Tabora. Materials and Methods: The study employed mixed paradigms. A number of 50 teachers were involved in the study. The study adopted cross-sectional survey methods designs. Data was collected by using questionnaires and interview. Research instruments were piloted validated and reliable; the result showed a C alpha equal to 0.81 which is establishing that research tools are reliable and acceptable to be used in the study. Purposive sampling techniques were used in this study where in-depth interviews were employed. The data were analysed thematically based on the study objective. Results: results shows that the level of Teachers' awareness of gifted children and the availability of learning resources among pupils in government primary schools in Tanzania is low. Furthermore, results from the field revealed that trained teachers play a significant role in the Original Research Article Paschal; AJESS, 27(4): 9-31, 2022; Article no.AJESS.86179 10 education of gifted children in school contexts; some of their role is to develop teaching and learning resources, creating a warm and conducive classroom, providing guidance and counselling to the learners. The findings of this study show that the most and well known strategy that teachers use to teach gifted children in primary schools was grouping strategy, enrolling gifted children in to the upper class, use supplementary reading sources to teach the gifted children in their classes, as well as individualizing teaching strategy in their instructions Conclusion: Findings revealed that majority of teachers have insufficient awareness about gifted children in public primary schools in Tanzania. The study suggest that in order to develop a clear awareness of gifted children in public primary schools, teachers should be trained in order to teach gifted learners. Professional development for teachers about gifted education should be conducted frequently. Moreover, to enhance effective learning, a teacher requires to significantly recognize with learners' concerns and try to understand things from the learner's perspective and choose the suitable way of instruction.
... Despite the law, a study which focuses on identifying the best practices related to the organisation of attention to diversity in the Basque Country suggests that, there is no systematic use of any diagnostic or intervention method for gifted students (Intxausti, Etxeberria & Barbau, 2017), and international research shows that there are many barriers such as; the lack of classroom management skills, teachers' attitudes and beliefs about learning, or the lack of administrative support, to carry out a real adaptation of the curriculum (e.g. VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). It follows that some improvements are required in order to more effectively educationally respond to gifted students. ...
Article
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Promoting school diversity is a goal shared by many countries, but actually achieving this goal in the day-to-day lesson is often hard to do and each country presents its own reality to face this aim. Having reviewed features of the Basque Country and its educational system, the present chapter describes how this region of Europe is able to respond to the diversity of students in an inclusive way. Firstly, the evolution of the laws which make inclusion possible is considered; and secondly, the wide range of measures that can be applied in order to cater for students needs in the environment of mainstream education is analysed. Although there may be some aspects which can be improved, the data referred to in the chapter demonstrates the success of the Basque Educational system so as to give an inclusive response to students’ diversity.
... 211-215). It is important to address these issues in gifted and talented education since gifted and talented learners' scores in top quartiles of standardized tests retreat towards the normal level of achievement unless these barriers are eliminated and suitable ways to cater gifted and talented students' educational needs are found (VanTassel-Baska &Stambaugh, 2005). When one examines the findings of this study, it can be argued that their hypothesis on decline of gifted and talented children on achievement to the normal level -in a sense-might be overlapped at the level of regression of the gifted and talented students' perceptions in Turkish context. ...
... Various studies showed that teachers faced struggles and challenges in implementing differentiated instruction. VanTassel-Baska and Stambaugh (2005) identified the key reasons why differentiation was hindered because of lack of content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge and skills, classroom management skills, beliefs as required for supporting differentiated teaching, lack of understanding how to accommodate approaches to learning for gifted learners, ineffective use of resources, lack of planning time, lack of support or encouragement by the school leadership. Joseph (2013) indicated that shortage of planning time, limited space for group work, and lack of administrative support were key barriers to differentiation. ...
Conference Paper
Differentiated instruction has been widely promoted in catering for learner diversity in different educational settings. Recent Hong Kong curriculum reform has highlighted differentiated instruction as an approach to cater to learner diversity (CDC, 2009). This study explores teachers' perceptions of differentiated instruction in two Hong Kong secondary schools (Grades 7-12). The main purpose of this investigation is to explore what obstacles teachers encountered in implementing differentiated instruction. Data were collected with the use of multi-methods approach, utilizing a whole-school survey and focus group interviews with teachers. Future curriculum development and teacher development will be discussed, as followed by research implications.
... De façon générale, plus les enseignants ont des attitudes positives envers les élèves ayant des besoins particuliers, plus ils ont l'intention de différencier leurs pratiques pour répondre à leurs besoins particuliers ou d'utiliser les pratiques recommandées (Monsen et collab., 2014 ;Sharma et collab., 2008Sharma et collab., , 2018. Ailleurs dans le monde, les recherches indiquent que les attitudes des enseignants à l'égard de la douance sont soit neutres soit négatives (Jung, 2014) et que les besoins des élèves doués sont faiblement pris en compte dans une perspective différenciée (Colangelo et collab., 2004 ;Kanevsky, 2011b ;VanTassel-Baska et Stambaugh, 2005). Les attitudes sont plutôt neutres ou légèrement positives concernant la reconnaissance des besoins éducatifs particuliers des élèves doués (Jung, 2014 ;McCoach et Siegle, 2007 ;Troxclair, 2013), mais elles sont plus négatives concernant les mesures à mettre en place pour répondre à ces besoins (Jung, 2014 ;McCoach et Siegle, 2007 ;Troxclair, 2013) et envers l'accélération scolaire (Bain et collab., 2007 ;Jung, 2014 ;McCoach et Siegle, 2007 ;Troxclair, 2013). ...
Article
Ce projet, subventionné par le Fonds de recherche du Québec - Société et culture et par les ministères de l’Éducation et de l’Enseignement supérieur, vise à dresser le portrait des attitudes des enseignants québécois du primaire et du secondaire à l’égard des élèves doués. Il vise également à établir le lien entre les attitudes, les pratiques déclarées et certaines variables individuelles ou contextuelles.
... The first step in evaluating a school's capacity to provide learning opportunities for gifted and talented students is for the school leadership to identify what teachers know about gifted learning and teaching, how they cater for gifted and talented students, and what they need to learn about it (Munro, 2017). Teachers may need up-skilling to identify how these students know and think in the classroom and to modify their teaching and curriculum provision (VanTassel-Baska, & Stambaugh, 2005). This is because professional development opportunities at school will consider what constitutes gifted knowing and thinking, how to assess this, the multiple ways in which students can be gifted, and how to skillfully differentiate teaching and provide appropriate learning opportunities (Munro, 2017). ...
Article
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Potential characteristic of a gifted and talented personality is influenced by social supports, environment, mentoring methods and educational structure. Children with exceptional talents need platforms and conducive vicinities to grow and develop these gifts. Proper education and professional counselling services could help talented children contribute to their respective communities. The absence of proper educational programs and professional counselling services may lead to loss of academic development, creative potential, appreciable performance, enthusiastic learning success, and substantial social contributions. The variety of services needed to meet the needs of talented children form an important basis of the current study. While there are numerous studies on talented children, no study combines the help of regular classrooms and community toward developing extraordinary talented children. The arguments that many talented children are assisted by school and community are reasonable but defeasible. The study attempts to weigh the contribution of both school and environment towards the development of talented children since a certain number of successful children use their skills, work ethics, and home training to perform excellently in various fields.
... Teachers confront with the challenge of creating an environment in which all students' needs can be met (Greenspan, 2005;Tomlinson, 2000;VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2005). When the case is the different knowledge levels of students, it is valid for corrective studies. ...
Article
This study focuses on students’ reflections on their prior learning, action plans generated by them, and the corrective instructional design process. The concern that initiates the beginning of this action research is two folds: on the side of students, to maximize students benefit from corrective instruction and on the teacher’s side, being more aware of the students’ lack of knowledge regarding related concepts in mathematics. This action research study is performed in three steps: Students’ reflection on their current situation related to prior mathematics learning as a base for their prospective learning, a process for generating an action plan for corrective instruction and implementation of an action plan based on those evaluations. Besides, it aimed to give teachers a basis for the design of the next stage of instruction. The study’s significance of prior learning on the effectiveness of new learning in mathematics offers concrete suggestions on how to design corrective instruction in light of students’ reflections and action plans. For the theory of practice, both the process and the study results will provide valuable information for teaching mathematics
Article
This article focuses on cluster teachers’ differentiation of their classroom instructional practices within an urban setting. Data were gathered from classroom observations of the learning task, questioning, and the classroom environment; ratings of observations using the Classroom Instructional Practices Scale; and interviews with teachers, parents, and students. Ten observers assessed the differentiation of classroom instructional practices in literacy and mathematics of 79 cluster classrooms in 18 different elementary/intermediate schools. Results indicated the majority of cluster teachers used a standardized guide in structuring their curriculum, created positive learning environments, and varied their learning activities. Teachers appeared to need permission for flexibility and professional development for implementing acceleration, varying activities for individual students within small groups, varying time for learning, managing behavior of multiple groups and independent learning, making connections across subject areas to learning outside of school, and understanding the characteristics and role of gifted students in the classroom. Some system practices were also identified as creating obstacles for differentiation.
Chapter
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The phenomenon of giftedness was highly examined in recent years, but there still remain a number of unsolved issues, ranging from the defining a term giftedness, through the identification of gifted individuals and, finally, to the establishing adequate support in education systems for gifted individuals. This paper aims to present a systematic review of current programs for gifted children: special schools, inclusion, acceleration and grouping, to point out the advantages and disadvantages of each of these programs and to offer a guide for those who work with gifted children. * ____________________________________________________________________________ * Ovaj rad ima za cilј sistematsko predstavlјanje četiri aktuelna pravca u obrazovanju dece već prepoznate kao darovite: inkluzivno obrazovanje darovitih u regularnim odelјenjima, grupisanje darovitih učenika u razrede po sposobnosti, akceleraciju ili ubrzano školovanje i školovanje darovitih u specijalnim školama. Svaki od navedenih programa biće detalјno opisan, biće predstavlјene njegove prednosti i mane. Prilikom odabira konkretnog programa potrebno je uzeti u obzir specifične potrebe deteta, kapacitete porodice kao i ustanove u kojoj se dete školuje.
Thesis
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There is still an apparent lack of critical thinking skills in English language reading comprehension among Malaysian secondary school students. This has been a major issue in the rural area of Sabah, the most isolated state of Malaysia. The students lacked the necessary skills to analyze reading texts to attain deep understanding as they became accustomed to recalling and recognizing skills only. Thus, the goal of this research is to examine the feasibility of SOLO (Structured of Observed Learning Outcomes) Taxonomy as the framework for designing questions that could foster higher order thinking skills in English as Second Language (ESL) reading comprehension. Questions are the most common tool used by any teacher in the classroom to elicit students’ responses and to evaluate their understanding but this research focused on utilizing questions to deepen students’ understanding of what they read by getting them to respond to questions which were developed according to SOLO levels: unistructural, multistructural, relational and extended abstract. The subject consisted of 30 students from two intact classes in a vocational secondary school located in the rural area of Sabah. This study narrowed the focus on four reading comprehension strategies: prediction, inference, questioning and making connection. An eight-week intervention that utilized SOLO questions in reading comprehension task was conducted to identify any possible effect of this approach. The mixed methods study comprised of pretests and posttests, questionnaire, interviews and concept maps. The results recorded students’ improved performance in utilizing the reading comprehension strategies that demonstrated their abilities to think more critically. It was also discovered that the students needed more support to progress from multistructural level to relational level as they struggled to balance consistency and closure. They were either reluctant to go beyond the text in order to remain consistent or they attempted to reach closure without sufficient explanation. Thus, the major implication of this study is the need to maximize multistructural level by getting students to familiarize themselves with the process of generating and ideas and exploring multiple ideas. Another implication is the importance of making them aware of their own thinking process so they learn to connect ideas in a meaningful manner that lead to well-supported conclusions. It is recommended that the role of lower level of understanding especially multistructural level in getting students to reach higher order thinking to be examined and explored as such responses might serve as early positive signs of critical thinking skills.
Article
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In the recent years, the educational response given to highly able students in the Autonomous Community of the Basque Country has been addressed from the perspective of educational inclusion and from the vision of being a group with specific needs of educational help. Although a great effort has been made from the families and from the educational system, actually only few students receive an adequate response. The objective of this qualitative study is to know how do teachers perceive the individual and educational characteristics that influence this response. For this purpose, a semi-structured in-depth interview for teachers has been designed and reviewed by three university professors and two parents. In total 12 interviews have been conducted. The qualitative data collected from the interviews have been processed with the Atlas.ti 8.3.20. program. The results show data related to the characteristics of highly able students, the perception of high abilities, the detection and the evaluation, and the educational and socioaffective needs of this students. It is concluded that teachers have a more realistic vision of high abilities, while myths and stereotypes still prevail in society. It also concludes that teachers still need to be trained, and that parents and society in general should be informed of the issue.
Article
The aim of the study is to determine the views of teachers working at the Science and Art Center regarding classroom management and misbehaviors. In this study, phenomenology approach, one of the qualitative research methods, was used. The study group of the research consists of ten (10) teachers working in the Science and Art Center of a province in the south of Turkey in the 2017-2018 academic years. The data of the research were collected through semi-structured interviews and the content analysis method was used in the analysis of the data. By emphasizing the unique characteristics of gifted individuals, teachers emphasized that misbehaviors may occur due to their active, curious, competent, ambitious and the adaptation problems they experience in formal education. However, they stated in their opinions that they did not see these behaviors as undesirable behaviors, but as the characteristics of gifted students. In addition, the teachers working in the Science and Art Center stated that the strategies they use to cope with the undesirable behaviors of their gifted students are educational-developmental planning, encouragement, giving responsibility, use of reinforcement, relocation, accepting and ignoring individual characteristics, precautionary and one-on-one conversation.
Article
This paper aims to examine the opinions of gifted children, their parents, and science teachers working at the Science and Art Centre (BILSEM) regarding science education for the gifted. The present study participants, which was conducted by utilizing the phenomenology design using one of the qualitative research methods, were ten talented students, seven parents, and two science teachers working at BILSEM. The study's data were collected using semi-structured interviews held with the participants. The collected data were analyzed by adopting the data analysis process proposed by Moustakas (1994) for phenomenological studies. The study revealed that gifted students possess a mental perception of sciences in the form of life, experience, and scientific knowledge. Talented learners want to learn science by employing experiments, projects, excursions, and observations. Based on these findings, it is recommended that gifted students should be provided with an enjoyable science learning environment to make them active, have fun while learning, perform experiments, and develop projects.
Thesis
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Heterogenität ist Teil des (Schul-)Alltags, was sich in den Lerngruppen widerspiegelt, die Lehrkräfte in der Schule vorfinden. Unterschiedlichen Bedürfnissen auf Seiten der Schüler/-innenschaft soll – und das ist in zahlreichen der Öffentlichkeit zugänglichen Dokumenten, wie Schulgesetzen, Schulordnungen und Standards für die Lehrerbildung festgeschrieben – in Form von Differenzierung begegnet werden. Innerhalb dieser Dissertation wird untersucht, wie Binnendifferenzierung auf Mikroebene in der Schulpraxis implementiert wird. Dabei werden die Einsatzhäufigkeit binnendifferenzierender Maßnahmen und Kontextvariablen von Binnendifferenzierung untersucht. Anhand einer Stichprobe von N = 295 Lehrkräften verschiedener Schulformen, die die Fächer Deutsch und/oder Englisch unterrichten, wurde u.a. gezeigt, dass Binnendifferenzierung allgemein nicht (sehr) häufig eingesetzt wird, dass manche Maßnahmen häufiger Einsatz finden als andere, dass an Gymnasien Binnendifferenzierung nicht so häufig eingesetzt wird, wie an anderen Schulformen und dass die Einsatzhäufigkeit bedingende Kontextfaktoren bspw. kollegiale Zusammenarbeit bei der Unterrichtsplanung und -durchführung, die wahrgenommene Qualität der Lehramtsausbildung hinsichtlich des Umgangs mit Heterogenität und die Bereitschaft zur Implementation von Binnendifferenzierung sind und auch Einstellungen zu Binnendifferenzierung und (Lehrer/-innen)Selbstwirksamkeitserwartungen in Zusammenhang mit dem Maßnahmeneinsatz stehen. Die durchgeführte Post-hoc Analyse zeigte bzgl. Einsatzhäufigkeit weiterhin Zusammenhänge zwischen der Persönlichkeit der Lehrkräfte und der Schulform, an der diese unterrichten. Die Ergebnisse entstammen der Schulpraxis und liefern deshalb praktische Implikationen, wie bspw. Hinweise zur Steigerung der Qualität der Lehramtsausbildung, die neben zukünftigen Forschungsansätzen im Rahmen dieser Arbeit expliziert werden. _____________________________________________________________________ Heterogeneity is part of everyday life, and classrooms mirror this reality. Thus, students’ broad array of learning needs should, as stipulated in numerous publicly accessible documents, such as school laws, school regulations and standards for teacher training, be meaningfully addressed through means of differentiated instruction. The present doctoral thesis examines how differentiated instruction at the micro level is implemented in school practice. In particular, teachers’ differentiated practice in terms of frequency of use, as well as context variables are examined. Data analyses from a sample of N = 295 German (as a school subject) and/or English teachers from different school tracks, indicated that: a) differentiated instruction is scarcely used in daily practice, b) that German and English teachers hold a low invariance in their differentiated instructional practices, and c) that in comparison to low and comprehensive school track teachers, high track school teachers implement far less differentiated instruction in their in-class practice. Additionally, the analyses from the present doctoral thesis show that teachers’ implementation of differentiated instruction is dependent on context factors, such as teacher collaboration in planning and implementation of lessons, the perceived quality of teacher training with regard to dealing with heterogeneity as well as teachers’ willingness to implement differentiated instruction, their attitudes and expectations of self-efficacy. Lastly, post-hoc analysis showed, with regard to the frequency of use, links between teachers’ personality and the school track at which they teach. Given that the results stem from school practice, they provide practical implications, such as information on the importance and necessity of increasing the quality of teacher training. Further practical implications are explored and future lines of research are discussed.
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The Decree-Law 54/2018 combined with Ordinance 223-A / 2018 - Article 33 regulates the inclusion of gifted students in Portuguese schools. This study aims to investigate primary school teachers` perceptions of giftedness and their experiences of working with gifted children in their regular classes. This is an exploratory study with 13 teachers and the data were collected through semi-structured interviews. Our participants tended to represent giftedness with an emphasis on the intellectual traits of gifted learners and to adjust their pedagogical approach accordingly. Their assessment practices focused essentially on product-oriented approaches instead of process-oriented approaches. Our findings suggest that there is still a long way to go, especially in terms of formal teacher training, to tailor teaching to the needs and characteristics of gifted learners.
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This study aims to give insight into teachers’ beliefs of high-ability students and how this relates to their classroom teaching. Thirteen teachers from six different elementary or secondary schools participated in in-depth interviews. The participants talked about cognitive functioning, social skills, classroom behaviour, motivation and specific characteristics of high-ability students. In addition, regarding educational practices with high-ability students, teachers agreed that providing challenging learning tasks is deeply important. Finally, we found that teachers with a limited frame of reference on high-ability students are likely to have a less extended repertoire of educational practices.
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تهدف الدراسة الحالية إلى البحث في التحديات المرتبطة بممارسات دمج مهارات التفكير في المنهج الدراسي لدى معلمات الطالبات الموهوبات في الصفوف العادية، والبحث في آثار التعليم عن بعد في ظل أزمة جائحة فيروس كورونا المستجد COVID-19 على ممارسات دمج مهارات التفكير في المنهج الدراسي، واستكشاف العوامل المؤثرة للتعليم عن بعد في تطوير ممارسات دمج مهارات التفكير في ضوء نتائج الدراسة. ولتحقيق هذه الأهداف قامت الباحثة باتباع المنهج النوعي وجمع البيانات عن طريق تطبيق المقابلة على مجموعة من المشاركات؛ وبلغ عددهن (22) معلمة من مدارس التعليم العام بالأحساء، وتمت عملية تحليل البيانات النوعية من خلال عمليات الترميز والتصنيف للبيانات، وأظهرت نتائج التحليل وجود (خمس) مجالات رئيسة للتحديات التي تواجه المعلمات في عملية تنمية مهارات التفكير في المنهج، وفئات فرعية لتلك المجالات، كما أظهرت النتائج وجود آثار إيجابية وآثار سلبية للتعليم عن بعد في فترة جائحة فيروس كورونا المستجد على عملية تنمية مهارات التفكير في المنهج، كذلك أظهرت النتائج أن هناك أربعة عوامل مؤثرة للتعليم عن بعد، وعامل إضافي؛ لتطوير ممارسات دمج مهارات التفكير في المنهج الدراسي، وبناء على تلك النتائج تم عرض بعض التوصيات والمقترحات.
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This article outlines findings of a study that investigated perceptions of Lebanese primary school teachers in relation to gifted/highly able students. While there are no specific policy or formal school practices for gifted students in Lebanon, education is nonetheless highly regarded. The aim of the study was to determine whether there were cultural differences in the way giftedness in students was perceived and supported by teachers at the primary school level in comparison to Western conceptualizations and provisions. A study utilizing qualitative and quantitative methods underpinned the gathering of data from 281 teachers across three governorates of Lebanon. Of the 281 teachers who completed the survey, 12 also participated in the qualitative component, which involved individual semistructured interviews. Findings suggested a generally positive attitude by teachers but also an acknowledgment of limited awareness of evidence based on Western understandings and practices associated with gifted education. The resultant data provided insights regarding the implementation of effective teacher education and concomitant support to improve identification.
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This study examined the effects of curriculum compacting on the achievement test seores of a national sample of 336 high ability students from second through sixth grade heterogeneous classrooms in rural, suburban, and urban settings. Curriculum compacting is a strategy for eliminating curricular material that students have already mastered and replacing it with more appropriate learning activities. Teachers from three treatment and control groups in this experimental study selected one to two students from their classes who demonstrated superior ability and advanced content knowledge prior to instruction. They were able to eliminate between 40%-50% of curricula for these students across content areas. Pre and post student achievement was examined using the Iowa Test of Basic Skills, and out-of-grade-level (one grade higher) tests were used to guard against ceiling effects. The results indicated that the achievement test scores of students whose curriculum was compacted did not differ significantly from students whose curriculum was not compacted. These findings from a national study minimize teachers' fears about declines in students' achievement test scores due to compacting.
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The Classroom Practices Observational Study conducted by The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) examined the instructional and curricular practices used with gifted and talented students in regular elementary classrooms throughout the United States. This article describes the procedures used in this study and the results obtained from systematic observations in 46 third or fourth grade classrooms. The observations were designed to determine if and how classroom teachers meet the needs of gifted and talented students in the regular classroom. Two students, one gifted and talented and one average ability student, were selected as target students for each observation day. The Classroom Practices Record (CPR) was developed to document the types and frequencies of differentiated instruction that gifted students receive through modifications in curricular activities, materials, and teacher-student verbal interactions. Descriptive statistics and chi-square procedures were used to analyze the CPR data. The results indicated little differentiation in the instructional and curricular practices, grouping arrangements, and verbal interactions for gifted and talented students in the regular classroom. Across five subject areas and 92 observation days, the observed gifted and talented students experienced no instructional or curricular differentiation in 84% of their instructional activities.
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This curriculum study of gifted-student learning in the language arts explores questions of curriculum efficacy related to the nature of the learner, the type of grouping model employed, and the strength of a curriculum treatment emphasizing literary analysis and interpretation and persuasive writing. The study further explores the use of curriculum effectiveness data to improve instruction the next time a unit of study is taught. Findings suggest that the curriculum treatment produces both significant and important learning outcomes for gifted students across 18 school district entities. Implications for further research and practice are highlighted.
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This study assessed student growth on integrated science process skills after being taught a 20-36 hour science unit. The prototypical unit, Acid, Acid Everywhere, was implemented in 15 school districts across seven states. Although seven science units for high ability learners have been developed through a federally funded project, the student outcome results only from Acid, Acid Everywhere, the most widely replicated unit, are reported here. All units were based on the Integrated Curriculum Model (ICM) developed specifically for gifted learners; the model stresses advanced content, high level process and product, and a concept dimension. Results indicate small, but significant, gains for students in integrated science process skills when compared to equally able students not using the units. Implementation data reflected satisfaction of teachers with the units, especially in terms of student interest and motivation. The effectiveness of this curriculum, designed to align with the new science standards and to be appropriate for gifted students, lends credibility to the argument for using the new content standards as a basis for curriculum development efforts with gifted learners.
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The 14 chapters in this volume are intended to facilitate differentiated curriculum development for gifted students that is substantive, rigorous, and in keeping with disciplinary structures. The chapters are: (1) "Content-Based Curriculum for High Ability Learners: An Introduction" (Joyce VanTassel-Baska); (2) "Accelerating Learning Experiences in Core Content Areas" (Joyce VanTassel-Baska and Beverly Shea); (3) "Incorporating Higher Order Process Skills into Content" (Jeanne M. Struck); (4) "Developing Creative Student Products" (Janine M. Lehane); (5) "Concept Development and Learning" (Linda D. Avery and Catherine A. Little); (6) "Adapting Language Arts Curricula for High-Ability Learners" (Catherine A. Little); (7) "Adapting Mathematics Curricula for High-Ability Learners" (Dana T. Johnson); (8) "Adapting Science Curricula for High-Ability Learners" (Beverly T. Sher); (9) "Adapting Social Studies Curricula for High-Ability Learners" (Molly M. Sandling); (10) "Selecting Resources and Materials for High-Ability Learners" (Linda D. Avery and Li Zuo); (11) "Making Appropriate Instructional Choices" (Jeanne M. Struck and Catherine A. Little); (12) "Assessing Student Learning" (Li Zuo and Joyce VanTassel-Baska); (13) "Aligning Curricula for the Gifted with Content Standards and Exemplary Secondary Programs" (Catherine A. Little and Wendy T. Ellis) and (14) "Implementing Innovative Curricular and Instructional Practices in Classrooms and Schools" (Joyce VanTassel-Baska). An appendix provides the "Standards for the English Language Arts Aligned with Curricular Emphases." (Individual chapters contain references.) (DB)
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This monograph addresses planning and developing curricula for low income and minority gifted learners. Issues discussed include collaboration among professionals working with these students, choice of school program delivery models, involvement of parent and community support systems in nurturing potential, and curriculum interventions directed toward the needs and profiles of this population. Section I focuses on definitions of low income and minority groups as the terms relate to gifted and talented students, intervention strategies, and collaboration among professionals. Section II describes characteristics of low income and minority gifted learners, and Section III presents model interventions to be used with this population. Finally, new directions for future curriculum and program design for use with low income and minority gifted learners are discussed. Three appendixes are included: (1) Interventions With Low Income and Minority Students Affecting Achievement and Motivation; (2) Effective Educational Interventions for Minority and Low Socioeconomic Learners; and (3) Libraries Link Learning (LLL) Sample Sessions. (Contains 1 figures.)
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Explores issues that negatively affect the academic success of gifted students in general, and African American students in particular. Issues of racial identity are discussed in terms of W. E. Cross's (1971) Negro-to-Black Conversion theory that involves 5 steps: preencounter, encounter, immersion–emersion, internalization, and internalization-commitment. Recommendations for school counselors are made as they endeavor to ensure the psychological and academic well-being of their students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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The Tennessee Value-Added Assessment System determines the effectiveness of school systems, schools, and teachers based on student academic growth over time. An integral part of TVAAS is a massive, longitudinally merged database linking students and student outcomes to the schools and systems in which they are enrolled and to the teachers to whom they are assigned as they transition from grade to grade. Research conducted utilizing data from the TVAAS database has shown that race, socioeconomic level, class size, and classroom heterogeneity are poor predictors of student academic growth. Rather, the effectiveness of the teacher is the major determinant of student academic progress. Teacher effects on student achievement have been found to be both additive and cumulative with little evidence that subsequent effective teachers can offset the effects of ineffective ones. For these reasons, a component linking teacher effectiveness to student outcomes is a necessary part of any effective educational evaluation system.
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