Article

High-impact educational practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

... LEAP prescribes the following "high-impact practices" (HIPs) as the most effective means for colleges and universities to fulfill essential undergraduate learning outcomes: 1) first-year seminars and experiences; 2) common intellectual experiences; 3) learning communities; 4) writing-intensive courses; 5) collaborative assignments and projects; 6) undergraduate research; 7) diversity/global learning; 8) service-learning; 9) internships; 10) capstone courses and projects; and 11) ePortfolios (Eynon & Gambino, 2017;Kuh et al., 2017;NSSE, 2006). A robust body of empirical literature suggests that student engagement in these practices is associated with positive outcomes such as higher retention (Kuh, 2008;Provencher & Kassel, 2017;Zilvinskis, 2019), career attainment (Miller, et al., 2018;Zilvinskis, 2019), and compensatory benefits for historically underrepresented student populations (Kuh, 2008). ...
... LEAP prescribes the following "high-impact practices" (HIPs) as the most effective means for colleges and universities to fulfill essential undergraduate learning outcomes: 1) first-year seminars and experiences; 2) common intellectual experiences; 3) learning communities; 4) writing-intensive courses; 5) collaborative assignments and projects; 6) undergraduate research; 7) diversity/global learning; 8) service-learning; 9) internships; 10) capstone courses and projects; and 11) ePortfolios (Eynon & Gambino, 2017;Kuh et al., 2017;NSSE, 2006). A robust body of empirical literature suggests that student engagement in these practices is associated with positive outcomes such as higher retention (Kuh, 2008;Provencher & Kassel, 2017;Zilvinskis, 2019), career attainment (Miller, et al., 2018;Zilvinskis, 2019), and compensatory benefits for historically underrepresented student populations (Kuh, 2008). ...
... These results are consonant with the mainstream Chinese system of undergraduate specialization and lack of experiential learning (Huang, 2019). In contrast, liberal education involving HIPs has expanded to private and public institutions that were not conventionally considered liberal arts in the U.S., with the goal of promoting both intellectual and practical skills for a broader range of population, especially those historically marginalized (Kuh, 2008). Moreover, although collaborative assignments and projects are common in the U.S., respondents described this practice as just beginning in China. ...
... HIPs are those pedagogical practices that actively engage students and result in significant learning. Yet, it often is left to individual departments to figure out how to put DEI and HIPs into practice (Kuh 2008). Research, a type of HIP, is one such practice that has notable learning outcomes for marginalized and minoritized students (Finley and McNair 2013). 1 Our study focuses on the impact that research has on student success. ...
... systemic or institutional inequities (Finley and McNair 2013). They are active-learning practices of different forms that comprise first-year seminars and experiences, common intellectual experiences, learning communities, writing-intensive courses, collaborative assignments and projects, undergraduate research, diversity and global learning, service learning, internships, and capstone courses and projects (American Association of Colleges and Universities n.d.; Kuh 2008). HIPs are characterized as time-intensive experiences, involving frequent interactions with diverse people, faculty members, and peers; regular feedback on performance; applied learning; and collaboration (Kuh 2008). ...
... They are active-learning practices of different forms that comprise first-year seminars and experiences, common intellectual experiences, learning communities, writing-intensive courses, collaborative assignments and projects, undergraduate research, diversity and global learning, service learning, internships, and capstone courses and projects (American Association of Colleges and Universities n.d.; Kuh 2008). HIPs are characterized as time-intensive experiences, involving frequent interactions with diverse people, faculty members, and peers; regular feedback on performance; applied learning; and collaboration (Kuh 2008). ...
Article
Full-text available
High-impact educational practices benefit undergraduate students in a variety of ways. These opportunities include student–faculty research, study-abroad and study-away programs, and internships, among others. This study focuses on one type of these high-impact practices: research. Research experiences foster student engagement and success, and they especially matter for marginalized and minoritized students, who all too often are underrepresented in these experiences. This article discusses creating, implementing, and experiencing equity-minded research opportunities for students from three perspectives: department head, faculty mentor, and undergraduate participants.
... Considerable scholarly attention has been given to investigating factors that affect student graduation rates and other indicators of student success (e.g., Millea et al., 2018;Murtaugh et al., 1999;Reason, 2009;Slanger et al., 2015). A body of research on student involvement has identified a specific array of high-impact educational practices (including service-learning, undergraduate research, internships, and diversity/global learning opportunities such as education abroad) and hypothesized that engaging students in such practices may positively impact academic performance, retention, and persistence toward graduation (Association of American Colleges and Universities [AAC&U], 2007;Kilgo et al., 2015;Kuh, 2008;Zilvinskis, 2019). ...
... For instance, when first-generation students feel that their language use does not conform to mainstream academic discourse styles, they may be less willing to participate in classroom discussions (White, 2011). Additionally, educational practices developed to cultivate academic and social engagement, such as living-learning communities and student clubs and organizations, do not factor in the economic and lived realities of first-generation students who are more likely to be employed while attending college, work more hours, and live off-campus (Holloway-Friesen, 2018;Kuh, 2008;Pascarella et al., 2004;Pike & Kuh, 2005;Stebleton & Soria, 2013). As such, the very activities meant to cultivate a sense of belonging -a strong predictor of student success (Azmitia et al., 2018;O'Keeffe, 2013;Walton & Cohen, 2011)-can functionally exclude students and exacerbate feelings of marginalization on campus. ...
... Although first-generation students do not participate in high-impact educational practices as frequently as their continuing-generation peers, several studies show they indeed benefit from participation in some of these practices as much as or more than their peers (Finley & McNair, 2013;Kuh, 2008). For example, Pascarella et al. (2004) found first-generation students to have stronger positive gains in learning and cognitive development from academic activities, co-curricular learning activities, and informal learning with peers when compared to their continuing-generation peers. ...
Article
This study utilized the large-scale, multi-institutional CASSIE dataset to examine the impact of education abroad participation on academic outcomes for first-generation college students. Using robust multivariate matching methodology that effectively minimized self-selection bias, results showed the magnitude of benefit offered by studying abroad was greater for first-generation students than for continuing-generation students. Even after matching on a variety of background and prior achievement variables, first-generation students who studied abroad had higher 4- and 6-year graduation rates, had higher cumulative GPA scores, and took less time to graduate—relative to first-generation students who did not study abroad. These findings suggest that education abroad programming can be leveraged as a high-impact educational practice to promote college completion rates among first-generation students.
... In addition to the more general research cited above, dozens of studies have rigorously examined the efficacy of specific active-learning strategies in individual courses through various quantitative studies (Bain, 2004;Kuh et al., 2005, Pascarella andTerenzini, 2005;Kuh, 2008). These studies typically document that students exposed to active learning approaches show improved learning, as assessed by metrics like pre-and post-assessment scores, when compared to students taught in a more traditional manner. ...
... These studies typically document that students exposed to active learning approaches show improved learning, as assessed by metrics like pre-and post-assessment scores, when compared to students taught in a more traditional manner. A detailed review of all these studies is beyond the scope of this chapter; Bain (2004), Kuh et al. (2005), Pascarella and Terenzini (2005), Kuh (2008), Narum (2008), and Fairweather (2009) all provide useful overviews of active learning strategies and the research support for them. The physics community has perhaps the longest history of experimenting with active-learning techniques in undergraduate classrooms and in assessing their effectiveness (Mazur, 1996;Hake, 1998;Crouch and Mazur, 2001;Deslauriers et al., 2011). ...
... In particular, materials developed for the 2009 workshop, "Teaching Paleontology in the 21 st Century," are all housed at this site (SERC, 2009). For guidance and further information about active learning in general and as applied to STEM courses, you may also find the following references valuable: Mac-Donald and Korinek, 1995;Paulson and Faust 1998;Edens, 2000;Wankat, 2002;Fink, 2003;Ramsden, 2003;Barkly et al., 2005;Wiggins and McTighe, 2005;Wieman, 2007;Grunert O'Brien et al., 2008;Kuh, 2008;Chasteen et al., 2010Chasteen et al., , 2011Khoury-Bowers, 2011. If you are ready to take the plunge, Chasteen et al. (2011) provide a blueprint for how to transform your course into a learner-centered one. ...
Article
In the most effective learning environments, undergraduates go beyond memorization to become more deeply engaged with the material. Active learning approaches, in which students participate in activities that result in improved learning, promote this sort of deep experience. Educational theories such as constructivism and recent research in cognitive and learning sciences demonstrate the importance of allowing students opportunities to confront misconceptions, reason out solutions, work collaboratively, and construct their own understandings of key concepts. Numerous studies have documented improved learning in classes using active learning approaches when compared to traditional class formats. Various obstacles to implementing active learning strategies exist, such as student and faculty resistance to such practices and the academic reward structure, which penalizes faculty who invest time in innovative teaching. These obstacles, however, are not insurmountable—effective communication of the benefits of active learning for improving student learning outcomes and the recruitment and retention of STEM majors can help. Paleontology instructors have a wide variety of active learning techniques to choose from, including some that make use of our field's uniquely visual and temporal characteristics (e.g., concept sketches, timelines), current research areas (e.g., textual analysis, case studies, guided inquiry), and classic controversies (e.g., role-playing, debates, and panel discussions). New technologies, such as classroom response devices and Web 2.0 tools, can facilitate many of these activities both in and out of the classroom. Incorporating active learning approaches into paleontology courses can help instructors clarify their course goals and learning outcomes while empowering students to succeed.
... Theoretical Framework. Prior research has found that through experiential learning and participation in high-impact practices, such as service-learning and faculty mentorship, students develop new knowledge, skills, and values, as well as self-efficacy for accomplishing future related challenges (e.g., Kuh, 2008). Similarly, students develop as leaders through hands-on experiences with space and processes for reflection, feedback, and mentorship (e.g., Soria & Johnson, 2017). ...
... We interpret these findings to mean that the APM program has the potential to, like other high impact practices (e.g., Kuh, 2008;Soria & Johnson, 2017), positions students in roles and scenarios in which they gain experience leading groups and thus develop confidence and efficacy to lead groups in the future. In line with similar programs (e.g., Otero et al., 2010), we believe that it may be the combination of practicing teaching through working with students, developing a relationship with a course instructor, and participating in a training course that provides pedagogical support, that lead to cognitive, personal, and professional development, including growth in leadership selfefficacy. ...
... Kuh & Schneider [3] identified undergraduate research as a high-impact practice in higher education, but also identified students' access to these practices as a key concern [3]. To address access to research experiences, the Purdue University Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR) established a faculty development program (based on CUREnet [4]) designed around two objectives: (a) in the immediate term, to provide instructors with knowledge and skills to integrate research experiences into a course, and (b) to reduce barriers for undergraduate students to participate in research experiences [5], targeted to make such opportunities available to more students, especially a more diverse set of students. ...
... Kuh & Schneider [3] identified undergraduate research as a high-impact practice in higher education, but also identified students' access to these practices as a key concern [3]. To address access to research experiences, the Purdue University Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR) established a faculty development program (based on CUREnet [4]) designed around two objectives: (a) in the immediate term, to provide instructors with knowledge and skills to integrate research experiences into a course, and (b) to reduce barriers for undergraduate students to participate in research experiences [5], targeted to make such opportunities available to more students, especially a more diverse set of students. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) increase students' access to research. This lesson plan describes an interdisciplinary CURE developed to be able to involve over 60 students per semester in original research using data from large particle physics experiments and telescopes, although the methods described can easily be adopted by other areas of data science. Students are divided into research teams of four, which greatly leverages the instruction time needed for mentoring, while increasing research productivity by creating accountability amongst the students. This CURE provides a strong framework, which minimizes barriers that students may perceive. This helps increase the number of students that benefit from a research opportunity while providing guidance and certainty. Through this CURE, students can engage in original research with the potential for publication-quality results, develop communication skills in various modes, and gain confidence in their performance as a scientist.
... One vehicle for growing substantive knowledge and data and methods training among undergraduates is through mentored research with faculty, which doubles as a high-impact practice for improving student retention and satisfaction (Gregerman et al. 1998;Jacobi 1991;Jordan-Zachery 2004;Kuh 2008). In addition, as detailed in the call for papers for this special issue, "a more competitive environment in and out of the university has created pressure for undergraduates to engage in projects that go well beyond a class exercise." 2 While these points emphasize the "demand side" of undergraduate research training, this article focuses on the "supply side," specifically how colleges and universities can encourage and support faculty to offer students research opportunities. ...
... Then, some students move up the research "value chain." Moreover, William & Mary has pushed to increase access to research opportunities, and to make access more equitable, in line with the argument advanced by Kuh (2008) and Murray (2017: chapter 8). In addition to groups who have been historically underrepresented in undergraduate research -women, students of color, and students with disabilities (Murray 2017: chapter 8) -our institution emphasizes the value of working with military veterans, neurodiverse students, and first-generation college students Intrinsic rewards are rarely enough, however, so we also have designed a number of extrinsic incentives. ...
Article
Full-text available
Undergraduates today face a more demanding and competitive labor market than their parents' generation. In response, some pursue double majors to signal breadth to potential employers and improve their job prospects. Some also realize that a strong signal of workplace readiness is having in-demand skills acquired through independent and collaborative research. In this article, four professors at an undergraduate-focused public university share experiences working with undergraduates on research, with a focus on the "supply side" of student research training and mentoring. We shed light on how institutions can support differently-situated faculty, facing different career incentives and constraints, to integrate undergraduates in research. We also address the limits of what is possible for faculty-student research and suggest some ways to overcome them.
... In 2008, the Association of American Colleges and Universities submitted a report titled "High Impact Educational Practices" to increase positive education results for students from widely varying backgrounds (Kuh, 2008). ...
... Evidence to support the initial 10 High Impact Practices (HIPs) came from data collected through the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) which suggested that purposeful, systematic, and active learning processes increase rates of student retention and engagement. (Kuh, 2008;Watson et al., 2016). ...
Article
Full-text available
A four-week global interdisciplinary service-learning project to Botswana, Africa was developed to increase cultural humility and cross cultural communication skills in 12 current and future educators of children with autism and developmental disabilities. Participants worked alongside peer educators in eight different special education units across different regions of Botswana to create curricular activities that can be used in classrooms in both countries. Instruction in Botswana education, culture, language, history, and traditions was provided along with immersion in daily Botswana life. The present study examines the impact of these experiences on participant growth of cultural humility and cross-cultural communication skills. Results indicated increases in cultural humility for all participants, with the greatest increases for the stages of integration and intercultural communication. Individual growth varied based on factors such as previous experiences, chronological age, and flexibility. In this paper, we discuss details of the project, results, limitations, and implications for practice. Abstract in Setswana Lenaneo la beke tse nne go ya Botswana, le le akaretsang mafatshefatshe, ebile ele la dikitso tse di farologanyeng, le ne la bopiwa go oketsa kitso ka ngwao ya Setswana le ka ha go buisanwang ka teng mo ngwaong. Kitso tse tsa ngwao, di ne di itebagantse le barutabana bale lesome le bobedi. Barutabana ba, ene ele ba jaanong le ba isago, ba ruta bana ba ba nang le autism le bogole jo bo farologaneng. Batsaya karolo ba ne ba bereka le barutabana mo makalaneng a a farologanyeng a le boroba bobedi ko Botswana, a a lebaganeng le dithuto tsa autism le bana ba ba nang le bogole. Ba dira jaana go bopa ditsamaiso tsa thuto tse di ka dirisiwang mo dikolong tsa mafatshe oo mabedi. Batsaya karolo ba ne ba tlhatlhelelwa ka tsamaiso ya thuto, ngwao, puo, ditso le tumelo mo Botswana, le gore di amana jang le matshelo a Batswana a tsatsi le letsatsi. Dipatlisiso tse di leka go kala maduo a phetogo maikutlo a batsaakarolo mo go godiseng kitso ka ngwao le dipuisano ka yone mo Botswana. Maduo a dipatlisiso a supile fa barutabana ba nnile le kgolo mo go tlhaloganyeng ngwao, go gola mo go tona e nnile go tlhaloganya dingwao tsa mafatshe ka bobedi. Se se raya gore lenaneo le, le nnile botlhokwa thata mo go bone. Go gola ga barutabana ka bongwe ka bongwe go ne go ikaegile thata ka maitemogelo a bone pele ga ba ya Botswana, dingwaga tsa bone le ka ha ba amogelang diemo tse di farologanyeng ka teng. Mo mokwalong o, re ala ka botlalo ka ha lenaneo le tsamaileng ka teng, maduo le ditlhaelo/dikgwetlho le ka fa lenaneo le ka dirisiwang ka teng go ya pele.
... Based on the findings from empirical research regarding student learning experiences, the Association of American Colleges and Universities lists 11 high-impact educational practices (HIPs). These 11 HIPs comprise capstone courses and projects, collaborative assignments and projects, common intellectual experiences, diversity/ global learning, eportfolios, first-year seminars and experiences, internships, learning communities, service community-based learn-ing, undergraduate research, and writing-intensive courses (Kuh, 2008). HIPs positively affect educational outcomes and best correlate with increased retention, student engagement, and persistence to graduation (Campbell & Blankenship, 2020). ...
Article
Adult learners take online courses or programs because of the convenience, cost-saving, flexible schedule, and work-life-school balance. In the United States, student enrollment in online education has proliferated in the past few decades. The online modality of providing education has become a crucial part of higher education. Online courses are in high demand. However, due to adult learners' characteristics and work-life situations, the course design and facilitation in online education can only partially replicate directly from the traditional classroom setting. Owing to high attrition rates in online classrooms, institutions and educators must carefully design or redesign courses relevant to the competitive job market demands. The need for contemporary instructional designs focusing on student-centered education is essential. Supported by comprehensive research studies, active learning, and high-impact educational practices have helped learners develop critical competencies and skills required by employers. Moreover, adopting appropriate pedagogical practices is necessary for better student engagement, academic performance, and retention rate. Article visualizations: </p
... 6. Practice and apply skills in real-world situations [13,14]: Provide students with opportunities to practice their intercultural communication skills in real-world situations, such as through community service projects, cultural exchanges, and other extracurricular activities. ...
Article
Full-text available
This article suggests a model for teaching English to 9–11-grade Uzbek students while helping them develop their intercultural communication skills. The model is made up of seven essential elements: laying the groundwork for cultural awareness, learning about other cultures, honing language skills, encouraging empathy and understanding, honing intercultural communication skills, practicing and using skills in real-world scenarios, and offering ongoing support and feedback. The model was created using data from a survey of English teachers in Uzbekistan, which revealed issues like a lack of exposure to diverse cultures, cultural barriers, a lack of resources, and limited language proficiency. The proposed model emphasizes the significance of continuous learning and the development of intercultural communication competence while aligning with well-established scholarly concepts and models, such as the Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity, the Cultural Intelligence Model, and the Experiential Learning Cycle. This model can be used by English teachers in Uzbekistan to help their students get ready to interact and communicate with people from different cultures and succeed in an interconnected world.
... Nas últimas décadas, e em especial nos últimos anos, tem sido considerável o número de profissionais ligados aos contextos de ensino superior que têm procurado esclarecer aquilo que as instituições podem fazer para otimizar o desenvolvimento do estudante (e.g., Astin, 1993;Chickering & McCormick, 1973;Chickering & Reisser, 1993;Pascarella & Chapman, 1983;Kuh, 2008 (Kuh et al., 1991(Kuh et al., , 2005(Kuh et al., , 2006, por outro lado, como nos lembram Astin, (1993), Tinto (1993) (Pascarella & Terenzini, 1991Tinto, 1993;Kuh et al., 2006;Miller, Kuh, Paine, & associados, 2005). ...
Conference Paper
The concept of student’s engagement in school (SES) has been the focus of the debate concerning academic success and school dropout. The aim of this study is to analyse the relation between student’s engagement in school and their participation on guidance activities. Our sample consisted of 853 high school students from both genders who attended different schools. Data was collected using Students Engagement in School – a four dimensional scale (Veiga, 2013) and Career Exploration Scale (Taveira, 2000). Analysis of the results showed differences in students’ engagement level according to their participation on guidance activities – students who had guidance versus students who had not, the later showing lower engagement –, as well as statistically significant correlations between engagement and career exploration.
... (Doyle et al., 2010;Hulstrand, 2006;Watson et al., 2013). Study abroad opportunities serve as high impact, experiential learning that incorporates global perspectives, diversity, and immersion in different cultures (Kuh, 2008). It is evident through previous research, that study abroad research implies a significant increase in intercultural sensitivity, knowledge, and competence (Bennett, 2004;Anderson et al., 2006;Martinez, 2012;Pederson, 2009 Students must continually reflect on their study abroad experience to develop increased levels of intercultural sensitivity (Bennett, 2004). ...
... "Impact" in Postsecondary Leadership Education. In today's political and economic climate, postsecondary institutions are under increased scrutiny to produce graduates who are adequately prepared to tackle contemporary global challenges (Dugan & Komives, 2007;Kuh, 2008). Measurements of adequate preparation are difficult to assess. ...
... The authors suggest programs in the first-semester that help determine purpose similar to many colleges' first-year experience programs. These are both examples of well-researched retention and persistence strategies (Gardner et al., 2002;Kuh, 2008). In addition, they assert that personalizing the student experience requires the restructuring of administrative functions and processes. ...
... In recent years, significant changes have been observed in teaching methods in higher education. Teaching is no longer solely focused on academic staff members, but instead emphasizes student-centred teaching and active learning (Gibbs, 1995;Lempert, 1996), with a focus on engagement and student involvement (Kuh, 2008;Kuh et al., 2010;Lattuca & Stark, 2009). In the last decade, co-creation, has become a crucial element of teaching, considering students as partners in learning and teaching (Cook-Sather et al., 2014;Dunne, 2016;Healey et al., 2016;Mercer-Mapstone et al., 2017). ...
Article
Full-text available
Graduates of higher education need, in addition to knowledge, skills such as cooperation, communication, and problem-solving to cope with their working life. Collaborative learning environments like co-creation, are gaining attention for their ability to cultivate these essential skills. This study aims to investigate the understanding and efficacy of co-creation from the perspective of 145 undergraduate students enrolled in a physics course, using a questionnaire. Design thinking, using the double-diamond model, is applied as the co-creation methodology. The study examines the effects of co-creation and design thinking on teamwork and the development of skills. The study also discusses the differences in co-creation, design thinking, teamwork, and skill development among various demographics, previous co-creation experiences, and teaching methods. The findings demonstrate that the majority of students understand the concepts of co-creation and design thinking, and that their co-creation teams functioned satisfactorily, leading to the development of necessary skills. However, increasing age seems to be an inhibiting factor. Finally, the study shows that students who prefer co-creation as a teaching method or have previous co-creation experiences are more receptive to this approach.
... Our teaching pedagogies should adapt to the 'new normal' to improve our learning and teaching. It may be time to consider seminar teaching formats and hands-on high-impact practices such as polling/word clouds, role plays, flipped classrooms, community service learning, learning communities, undergraduate research with faculty, field experiences, et cetera, all of which can help promote whanaungatanga and build a collaborative environment where students can take more active roles, feel empowered and are able to develop a sense of ownership, belonging and connection (see, e.g., Dohaney et al., 2015;Kuh, 2009;O'Steen & Perry, 2012). ...
Article
Full-text available
This short commentary discusses effective university teaching in the context of the pandemic, the corresponding digitalisation of tertiary education, and the recent lecture attendance crisis. By critically reflecting on my own experience as a university educator and as a student in a teacher education course, I suggest that the attendance crisis presents an opportunity to explore effective teaching in a rapidly changing context. To improve our teaching and learning, we can reflect on what students and teachers have gone through and seek to understand who our students are.
... Los propósitos son reflejos de los propósitos de la educación superior vistos como cualquier medida de la calidad educativa; el nivel de los programas son el reflejo de los programas de grado particulares que estudian los estudiantes en lugar de la institución en general, vistos como medida de la educación debe centrarse; la enseñanza ofrecida representa la medida válida de la calidad educativa centrada propiamente en la calidad de la enseñanza y no en el prestigio institucional; las perspectivas representan la idea clara del conocimiento de un programa de grado, desde diferentes perspectivas; refleja lo que piensan los estudiantes que estudian los programas, y lo que van a hacer los estudiantes después de graduarse (Ashwin, 2020). La investigación del proceso educativo son medidas que deben basarse en una visión coherente e informada por la investigación del proceso educativo (Chickering y Gamson, 1987;Kuh, 2008;Ambrose et al., 2010;Gibbs, 2010;Laurillard, 2012;Entwistle, 2018;Ashwin et al., 2020). Las prácticas docentes son medidas de calidad que requieran que las instituciones para que mejoren sus prácticas educativas y así también mejorar su desempeño; y la simplicidad es el reflejo de medidas relativamente simples de calidad educativa (Ashwin, 2020). ...
Article
Full-text available
El problema a resolver fue saber cuál es la relación entre los conocimientos y las actitudes sobre lactancia materna exclusiva, en madres del menor de 6 meses, del Centro de Salud Lauriama, en Barranca, año 2023. La metodología usada consistió en el enfoque cuantitativo; tipo básico; diseño no experimental transversal correlacional; método hipotético-deductivo; técnica de la encuesta; cuestionarios, como instrumentos, cuidadosamente diseñados por un reconocido científico peruano; de un total de estudiantes se consideró una muestra al azar de 96 estudiantes de una universidad privada limeña, sin distinciones. Los resultados mostraron que, a un nivel de significancia de 0,05 se obtuvo un p-valor = 0,000, y una correlación Rho de Spearman = 0,451**, por lo que se pudo establecer que había relación de variables y se rechazó la hipótesis nula y se aceptó la hipótesis alternativa. Se concluyó que la educación remota se relaciona directamente con la calidad educativa, en una universidad privada limeña, 2022. Los resultados de esta investigación se justificaron teóricamente, debido al aporte de conocimientos de las variables aquí estudiadas, Educación remota universitaria y Calidad educativa universitaria, tanto cada una de forma independiente, como relacionadas entre sí. Los resultados de esta investigación se justificaron en la práctica, debido al aporte de las bases mediante las cuales una universidad limeña ha de implantar estrategias, planes y programas tendientes al mejoramiento de su sistema educativo, específicamente en la educación remota aún otorgada a los estudiantes, a fin de contribuir así a una mejora de su calidad educativa.
... HIP experiences are powerful, educational practices that promote high-quality learning and enhance student success (Kuh et al., 2017). According to Kuh (2008), these HIP courses should: 1) be purposeful and require effort, 2) involve substantial interaction between faculty and classmates, 3) include engagement with others who are different than themselves, 4) provide frequent feedback, 5) help students integrate and apply what they are learning, 6) offer opportunities to gain awareness and refine beliefs and values, and 7) provide opportunities to apply knowledge and skills to real world settings. This project presents a project in a undergraduate social work course which was designed to enhance the professional skills of students while increasing empathy and social justice. ...
Article
Full-text available
The high impact, experiential education of service-learning was utilized in a Forensic Social Work class to enhance students’ social work skills. Students and faculty, along with another community partner provided animal-assisted grief support groups to individuals who were incarcerated. Two support groups were provided to individuals who suffered a recent or unresolved loss, one with women and one with men. Social work skills of empathy, professional boundaries, social justice, group facilitation, and applying theory to practice were greatly enhanced through this service-learning, high impact practice. The added value of therapy dogs in enhancing the therapeutic process was also noted.
... As a result, many universities are integrating forms of engaged education that provide students with experiential learning opportunities in and with the surrounding community (Bell 2010;Fitzgerald et al. 2012). One such practice linked to experiential learning is often referred to as service-learning or community-based learning (Kuh 2008). To emphasise the significance of interaction with communities, we have chosen to use the term Community Service Learning (CSL) in this paper, although it is important to note that, oftentimes, these terms are used interchangeably. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background Higher education institutions (HEIs) are increasingly affording greater prominence to various forms of engaged education, including Community Service Learning (CSL). Embedding CSL into institutional cultures, climates and expectations so that it becomes a mainstream pedagogy is often referred to as institutionalisation. Given the growing significance of CSL within the higher education landscape, more needs to be understood about aspects that may contribute to its institutionalisation. Purpose This review study sought to gain insight into the factors that facilitate the institutionalisation of CSL, how they relate to each other, and how the institutionalisation process unfolds over time. Design and methods We conducted a systematic and configurative review of peer-reviewed literature that described the institutionalisation process in HEIs. Through a thematic analysis and synthesis, factors and related strategies that contributed to successful institutionalisation were identified and categorised. Findings Our literature analysis indicated that factors and strategies for institutionalisation of CSL can be categorised within three main phases: start-up, scale-up and sustaining. CSL can result from a top-down effort or might be initiated from the bottom up. Depending on the approach used, the strategies change accordingly. When scaling up CSL, various individuals need to decide if they want to adopt CSL; the review offers strategies to support adoption. Finally, the strategies related to the start-up and scale-up phases need to become formalised in order to sustain CSL within HEIs. Conclusion Our review resulted in a comprehensive overview of factors and related operational strategies that can contribute to the institutionalisation of CSL. By bringing the three phases and related strategies together, this review offers a synthesised view of how the institutionalisation process of CSL may be conceptualised.
... Continuing on the work of Astin, the concept of student involvement was later extended to the concept of SE. What distinguishes SE as a new concept from the previous concept is that it is enriched and expanded with some aspects, older or newer, such as effort and time spent on the task and effective practices in teaching and learning (Kuh, 2008;Pascarella and Terenzini, 2005;Tinto, 1993;Coates, 2006). Engagement represents a higher level of involvement -the novelty is that engagement, in addition to understanding and activity, also includes feelings. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The purpose of this article is to research the customers' perception of names for different lipstick shades, with emphasis on knowledge of English as a prerequisite for determining the colour. The aim was to determine whether customers are able to comprehend the message communicated by the name of a lipstick, to determine to which extent the respondents’ knowledge of English is in correlation to the right choice of colour. Research data was gained through an online questionnaire (N=95). Data was analysed to prove the hypotheses. Data analysis showed that respondents were mostly able to choose the correct colour, based on both previous experience and their perceived knowledge of English. As the survey was conducted on a relatively small sample, consisting of predominantly female respondents, the outcome may not necessarily be representative of a larger sample, so further research is recommendable. Findings can be used for marketing purposes, but also in business English language courses. This paper provides insight into how perceived knowledge of language is related to the right choice of a beauty product, and can be used as starting point for further and more comprehensive research.
... Undergraduate research is one of eleven high impact practices shown to increase deep learning 42 among students of all backgrounds (Kuh, 2008). When undergraduate research opportunities are 43 embedded in the curriculum through Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences 44 (CUREs), participation once limited to a select number of students becomes accessible to all. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Genomics Education Partnership (GEP), a consortium of diverse colleges/universities, provides support for integrating genomics research into undergraduate curricula. To increase research opportunities for underrepresented students, GEP is expanding to more community colleges (CC). Genomics research, requiring only a computer with internet access, may be particularly accessible for 2-year institutions with limited research capacity and significant budget constraints. To understand how GEP supports student research at CCs, we analyzed student knowledge and self-reported outcomes. We found that CC student gains are comparable to non-CC student gains, with improvements in attitudes toward science and thriving in science. Our early findings suggest that the GEP model of centralized support with flexible CURE implementation.
... These approaches suggest ancillary or extra-programmatic developmental pathways from which other communitybased learning course and program partnerships, and institutions more generally might benefit. Exploring pathways for advancing student growth as gauged against widely adopted high-impact practices (HIP) (Kuh, 2008) is the focus of Risto Marttinen, Brianna Meza, John Gleaves, Debra Patterson, Maria Beitzel, and Joao Barros in their article, High Impact Practices in Domestic and Study Abroad Service Learning Kinesiology and Physical Education Courses. Like many submissions for this journal, this piece could as easily have been placed in the student outcomes section, but their approach interestingly juxtaposes domestic and international service learning with study abroad as a multi-dimensional context for examining student growth metrics within the HIP framework. ...
Article
Full-text available
Introducing Volume 10 of the Journal, Co-Editors Alan Bloomgarden and Jessica Mann set the research presented in 2022 articles in context of dialogue with key current conversations underway on issues facing our field, including reciprocity, accountability, global and anticolonial perspectives, and engagement among and between diverse participants. Research on service learning and community engagement included here spans and often crosses the thematic boundaries of the Journal’s sections, devoted to Advances in Theory and Methodology, Student Outcomes in Primary, Secondary, and Higher Education, Community Impacts and Outcomes, International Service Learning and Community Engagement Research, and Book Reviews. The Editors call upon our field to continue and further support growth and capacity for developing and publishing scholarship from across the globe, and speak to that work as central to achieving the International Association for Research on Service Learning and Community Engagement’s goals for presenting high-quality scholarship and advancing equity and inclusion.
... The characteristics of high impact practices identified by Kuh [14] also drove the project design, in particular ...
Article
In the third-year microprocessors course given to Mechatronics Engineering students at the University of Waterloo, the lab studies have been redesigned as a scaffolded project. The project aims to provide a more authentic learning opportunity that integrates concepts from the concurrent courses, as well as prior courses. The project was carefully designed to provide some student autonomy while ensuring competence can be achieved by students with a broad range of initial skill levels through the completion of authentic tasks. The impacts of the revised project on student learning were measured using pre- and postproject surveys, course grades and course critiques. Despite significant challenges that were encountered during the first two offerings, the results show that students perceived an increased competence in several key skills, and an increase was seen in overall course satisfaction.
... The value of collaborative group work as an example of student-centred learning is well documented (Armbruster et al. 2009;Ekimova & Kokurin 2015;Hammar Chiriac 2014). In particular, we suggest that collaborative learning in highly structured groups is the most likely learning design to achieve high-impact learning outcomes (Kuh 2008). With respect to STEM disciplines, people learn best in active learning environments "involving problem-solving discussions with peers", and this is more effective than traditional lectures (Eberlain et al. 2008, p. 271). ...
Article
In Australia, a significant number of students enrol in first-year university biology without the benefit of high school biology. In order to help students support each other, the authors of this paper (a central unit academic developer and a biology coordinator of first-year biology) created a classroom activity that facilitated the distribution of the more experienced students of biology throughout the practical work groups. An important feature of this creative design for forming groups, called the GLO Activity in this paper, was the embedding of two of the University’s key teaching and learning priorities within the activity. These were the University’s eight graduate learning outcomes (GLOs) and, inclusive education practice. We discuss creative pedagogies in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) and their link to supporting students in their first year of university study. We explain our scholarly thinking behind the GLO Activity and evaluate its impact. Finally, we reflect on how we, the educators, found satisfaction in thinking deeply to create a new learning structure for a biology practical class that solved one teaching challenge but also met a number of the University’s curriculum principles.
... A focus on the "whole student" has created the opening to the idea that structured practices outside of the classroom, such as through the work of campus activities offices, may make an impact on student learning. Institutional investment in high impact practices has influenced campus outcomes for student learning, frequently without mention of campus activities practice on these lists of key activities (Kuh, 2008). Still, the "getting involved" message rings loud and clear from institutional podiums across the country for its value to the student experience. ...
Article
With so many positions in campus activities requiring advanced degrees, campus activities practitioners begin their careers with a depth of understanding of current scholarship in the field. Once arriving to these positions on campuses, however, many practitioners may be challenged to stay engaged when faced with the limitless priorities of daily work. If the profession were to embrace the value of scholarship, it would require new points of view about the work of campus activities practice from institutions, associations, campus leaders and individual professionals. In the context of changing campus activities practice, I suggest a broader conception of the meaning of scholarship as a way to encourage campus activities practitioners to find closer alignment with the academic community within colleges and universities.
... The scope and nature of 'interactions with diverse others' and 'considerable time and effort' were not supported by the results and findings. However, they should be considered as characteristics for high impact extracurricular experiences and additional studies, given their importance in student engagement (Kuh, 2008), and given that these results are tentative. ...
Article
This study, conducted by a small group in a master’s level class taught by Dr. Christine Wilson, assessed extracurricular experiences at a large, public university to identify potential alignment with characteristics of “high-impact practices” as defined by the Center for Postsecondary Education (2015). Students engaged in extracurricular experiences tentatively defined as high-impact were invited to participate via surveys and interviews. Results and findings indicated significant alignment, and two additional potential characteristics: a sense of belonging and purpose.
... Study abroad programs have often been lauded as high-impact practices for student success and persistence (Kuh 2008;Stebleton et al. 2013). According to NAFSA (2019) which is considered the leading international education association in the USA, study abroad is assumed to "help American students succeed in their careers, and collectively, these international experiences lead to a more innovative, secure, and prosperous United States" (NAFSA 2019). ...
... Internships as a high impact practice work because they help students connect their classroom learning with real world applications (Kuh, 2008). Combining skills and knowledge in the workplace allows majors to directly apply learning to work. ...
Preprint
Part of the college experience is to develop our sense of who we are, both as a person and as a professional. How we develop these identities can vary across groups and experiences. Advising can be a crucial part of helping students come to understand who they are as a professional. As students begin to think about their future careers, aspirations, and goals, faculty can help that process by providing feedback about their strengths, achievements, and help students find their interests in our field. This paper examines identity development in the context of advising and gives concrete examples of how to support students in political science, including differences that our discipline faces in comparison to others.
Article
One of the best ways for STEM students to understand the methods and thought process of their discipline is through participation in an undergraduate research project. However, mathematics secondary education students at Hood College are historically less likely to self-select for these types of supplemental experiences than traditional mathematics majors. Hood’s Noyce STEM Teacher Education Partnership (NSTEP)¹1 The Hood Noyce STEM Teacher Education Partnership (NSTEP) program is funded by the National Science Foundation’s Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program (DUE 1660640). sought to address this by designing a shortened summer research experience specifically for secondary education students in mathematics. The Summer Research Experience in Mathematical Modeling (SREM²) was a four-week summer research project that provided this opportunity at a small college. Here we describe the benefits of such an experience and present the design of our program and its outcomes.
Article
Thirty years after the last APSA-sponsored recommendations on the structure of the undergraduate political science major, new efforts at curriculum reform are under way. As a prelude to how the profession might respond, this article examines how political science departments made undergraduate curriculum changes during the 2010s. Based on a survey of department chairs in 2019–2020 (prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S.), one-half of political science programs changed major requirements in the previous five years and 70% made revisions during the decade. Most changes involved adding courses or tracks and modifying course sequences within the prevailing model of subfield distribution. Assuming departments are rational actors seeking to improve student learning and respond effectively to the educational marketplace, various explanations of curriculum change were tested. Structural variables (institutional type and departmental factors) had no significant effects. Nevertheless, the survey revealed learning-based (acquiring disciplinary knowledge, developing intellectual skills) and market-based (concern about enrollments) motivations for change, as well as institutional constraints. Among curricular alternatives to the distribution model, evidence indicated greater support for promoting liberal learning outcomes. Moreover, the civic engagement movement influenced departmental decision-making. However, few programs made curriculum changes related to diversity, equity, or social justice, notable concerns among students and within the discipline.
Chapter
The aim of this paper is to provide insight to delivering global sustainability education in online asynchronous environments. High impact educational practices such as service-learning, community-based learning and global learning often require face-to-face interaction and off-campus travel. Few high impact practices are offered in an asynchronous online environment, highlighting a need in sustainability education that was made particularly urgent by the covid-19 pandemic. To address this need, an online asynchronous course was developed focused on Zero Hunger. Students explore different aspects of food security in domestic and international settings through asynchronous modules before being tasked in the creation of an individual action plan to address the issue of food security in a designated target audience. Students work independently on the action plans culminating their learning with an impact report presentation to the class community. The authenticity of the learning experience is increased by harnessing the power of student autonomy and student voice in crafting the application of course content knowledge. Intentional reflection on all aspects of the action project, including project impact, is a key aspect of enduring student learning. Course participants have the opportunity for cultural learning and intercultural communication due to a multinational cohort of students in each class. Well-designed high impact educational practices can play an important role in sustainability education in online, on-demand environments.
Article
Sport management programs have a long history of incorporating experiential learning practices into curricula for the purpose of cultivating students’ practical competencies, both applied and transferable. However, research considering the concept (and value) of transferable skills in sport management education is notably absent. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to understand the salient, transferable skills that sport management students acquire during their undergraduate education and how these are applied to careers both within and outside the sports industry. This research is based on qualitative data collection intended to assess the impact of sport management education on career preparedness. Major findings include the importance of skills in the following areas: teamwork/collaboration, critical thinking/comprehension/analytical skills, general business knowledge, time management, public speaking/presenting, and leadership/management. This research offers important implications regarding the preparatory role of sport management academic programs and educators moving forward.
Article
This paper describes the design and implementation of a political advocacy project in an Organic Chemistry II course. The advocacy project was designed to demonstrate that organic, green, and sustainable chemistry can be applied outside of laboratory and industrial settings to help solve issues related to environmental sustainability. After the instructor identified pending state legislation relating to sustainability, students read and summarized the bill. After class discussion, students did further research into questions raised in the discussion and prepared talking points. The talking points were developed into a white paper or postcard in advance of a class trip to the state capitol to share the views with legislators. Student reflections indicated a positive experience with advocacy, a greater understanding of environmental issues that affect them, and better awareness of how they can affect change.
Article
Student research fellows at three universities (Illinois State University, St. Mary's College of Maryland, and Wheaton College) conducted ethnographic research among peers in anthropology programs to better understand students’ experiences in the major and their career goals. In this article, we highlight student narratives of personal and intellectual growth. We found that current majors had more to say about how they had been transformed by anthropology than about the specific anthropological skills relevant to future careers. We posit that students’ personal growth, including greater empathy and open‐mindedness, and intellectual growth, including cross‐cultural understanding and the ability to think critically, developed through students’ integration into departmental communities of practice.
Article
Full-text available
Institutions of higher education require diversity courses so that students can increase their multicultural awareness, knowledge, and skills. Multicultural Psychology courses play a pivotal role in instilling cultural competence in students. The study examined differences in cultural competence and civic engagement for 1,053 undergraduate students exposed to different types of high-impact practices enrolled in educational psychology, multicultural psychology, and psychology internship courses. There was a significant Group x Time interaction effect for cultural skills. Post hoc analyses revealed that students exposed to diversity service-learning in a multicultural psychology course acquired cultural skills compared to students exposed to academic service-learning in the educational psychology course and those students exposed to fieldwork in an internship from the beginning to the end of the semester. Students in the multicultural psychology course were also intellectually challenged, reflected on the course concepts, and gained a deeper understanding of the course content more than students in the educational psychology course. Recommendations for teaching diversity courses are discussed. Article visualizations: </p
Article
Full-text available
The past half century has witnessed exponential increases in the cost of a college degree paralleled by an increase of undergraduate students who are employed during matriculation. While the impact on learning outcomes due to off-campus employment continues to receive much attention, there has been little attention paid to students employed on-campus through student worker programs and their benefits, especially in developing durable skills and improving retention. Research has demonstrated that engagement in on-campus activities improves retention and persistence in students. Additionally, employers desire power or durable skills (formerly known as "soft skills"), and that student worker programs are suited to meet this demand. This study proposes to investigate the way student worker programs across institutions support the development of durable skills, how these can be leveraged to improve persistence and completion rates in undergraduates, and how those differ by program. Results indicate that library services represent a model for other functional areas to adopt for student workers in order to improve retention and graduation rates, along with employable skills.
Article
Using a bibliographic approach that employs a systematic literature review, this paper analyzes the state of the field for assessing transformative learning (TL). Assessing TL has always been challenging. Using the field of international education (IE) as a case study, this article leverages findings from the assessment of TL in IE to illustrate overall strengths and limitations of TL assessment instruments and techniques within the larger arc of TL theory. The field of IE exemplifies the challenges of TL assessment generally. This article reinforces distinctions between TL and “good learning,” recommends better alignment between scholarship and the needs of institutional administrators, considers current uses and limitations of instruments grounded in cognitive approaches, and concludes with new directions possible through the inclusion of extra‐rational perspectives in the assessment of TL.
Article
The aim of this study was to determine the impacts of community service-learning (CSL) on the career adaptability, ethics, and social responsibility of Chinese undergraduate students studying business in Hong Kong. The CSL program was a credit-bearing program lasting two to three months (not less than 80 service hours). In a pre-test-post-test experimental design, students who enrolled in the class were the experimental group (n = 147; 67 male, 80 female) and students who did not enrol in the class were the control group (n = 104; 47 male, 57 female). The students completed the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) China Form and the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility Scale (PRESOR) before and after the CSL program. At pre-test there were no significant differences between the two groups in CAAS or PRESOR scores. However, at post-test, mixed Group x Time ANOVAs showed that students in the experimental group had greater increases in career adaptability (including concern, control, curiosity, and confidence) and perceived role of ethics and social responsibility (including stockholder and stakeholder view), than those in the control group. The results show that CSL has positive impacts on students’ career adaptability, ethics, and social responsibility.
Article
When the American Anthropological Association offered its Undergraduate Research Fellows program in 2019–2020, the intent was not only to obtain ethnographic insights into the college‐workforce transition for anthropology majors, but also to provide a meaningful educational experience to the participating student‐researchers. Previously (Ginsberg and Jackson, this issue), we have situated the fellowship program with reference to ethnography of higher education and native ethnography; in this paper, by contrast, we contextualize it with scholarship on high‐impact practices in undergraduate education, including research opportunities, collaborative assignments, and community‐based learning. We then present reflections from the student‐researchers themselves regarding what they learned through participation in the fellows program. In their reflections, the fellows describe a process of becoming more central members of three overlapping communities of practice: the AAA research team, their respective home departments, and the discipline of anthropology overall. We conclude by discussing reasons why anthropology is particularly well suited to provide undergraduate research opportunities, and why doing so would strengthen the discipline as well.
Article
Full-text available
While leading students to Thailand for an eight-week undergraduate research experience, we observed challenges in stacking the high-impact practices of study abroad and undergraduate research and became compelled by the usefulness of an Ethics of Care approach to facilitate the kind of transformation these practices can have for students. We observed students during the trip and conducted interviews with them after the trip. From those observations and interviews, we conclude that Care Ethics is particularly helpful for mitigating the risks of emotional exhaustion, for navigating dependency and vulnerability, and for re-framing student difficulties in positively transformative ways. Faculty can facilitate the advantages of high-impact practices by: treating emotions as pedagogical sources for learning; acknowledging dependencies; identifying vulnerabilities; devoting attention to how public and private spaces are framed; and cultivating care as a feminist and anti-racist practice. Abstract in Spanish Mientras guiábamos a un grupo de estudiantes a Tailandia para una experiencia de investigación de pregrado, observamos desafíos al combinar prácticas de alto impacto. Combinabamos los estudios en el extranjero e investigación de pregrado, y para enfrentar los desafios que surgieron, adoptamos un enfoque de ética del cuidado. Observamos a los estudiantes durante el viaje y realizamos entrevistas con ellos después del viaje. A partir de esas observaciones y entrevistas, concluimos que la ética del cuidado es particularmente útil para mitigar los riesgos del agotamiento emocional, para navegar por la dependencia y la vulnerabilidad, y para reformular las dificultades de los estudiantes de manera positivamente transformadora. El profesorado puede facilitar las ventajas de las prácticas de alto impacto al: considerar las emociones como fuentes pedagógicas para el aprendizaje; reconocimento de las dependencias; identificación de las vulnerabilidades; atención a cómo se enmarcan los espacios públicos y privados; y cultivo del cuidado como práctica feminista y antirracista.
Preprint
The terms "experiential learning" and "learning communities" both appear on current lists of high impact practices in higher education. But while internships have consistently been the subject of pedagogical study over the past fifty years, the study of learning communities, after an initial flurry of activity in the 1990s, declined precipitously. With our institution's Washington D.C. Summer Study Program as its focus, this study proposes to use qualitative and quantitative methods to analyze the quality of students internship experiences, asking the question How does an internship completed within a learning community increase a student experiential learning and subsequent civic engagement? We also hope, through focus groups, to better understand the underlying causal process between the students experiences and their subsequent civic engagement and long-term career success.
Article
Although higher education now seeks to involve more students than ever before in high impact practices, as educators we still struggle with how optimally to assess student learning in and across such experience and contexts. Many of the items in our assessment toolkits were designed to document student learning through more traditional processes (such as lecture) and products (such as end-of-term research papers). While these items continue to be valuable, they may prove insufficient to our current varieties of pedagogical practice and goals for student engagement.
Chapter
Full-text available
How can youth in developing countries enhance knowledge and capacity for civic engagement? What role can international development assistance play in youth civic learning and capacity development? This chapter weighs in on youth civic engagement from the angle of “social audit,” a participatory tool and approach. It does so by examining two specific initiatives designed and implemented by the author in Belize and Guatemala with support from international development organizations and local universities. In addition to describing the social audit approach, including the strategy and methodology, this chapter also provides initial evidence showing that introducing university students in developing countries to civic engagement, even with short and focused workshops that combine a mix of pedagogical approaches, has a potential to lay down a foundation to increase civic engagement and facilitates the development of basic knowledge and skills. Although international development assistance can play a crucial role in supporting youth civic engagement in developing countries, the effort will remain incomplete unless changes in youth attitude and behavior are systematically measured and effort is sustained through continuous civic engagement support by local stakeholders, including universities.
Article
Implementation of international experiences for students has increased. Anecdotal evidence suggests that these experiences enhance the quality of students upon graduation. However, a synthesis of literature related to the benefits of international experiences was lacking. We rooted the study’s conceptual framework in the concept of high-impact activities/experiences and related inputs, processes, and outcomes with a focus on the benefits of student participation in an international experience. Our purpose was to establish a benchmark documenting research conducted related to the benefits of an international experience and to identify research gaps. The rigorous literature review process identified 108 articles published across 55 unique publications for inclusion. Documentation of benefits was grouped into four categories: personal growth, international knowledge, cultural awareness, and additional skills. Further, the literature revealed a litany of reasons that students chose not to participate and a wide range of guidance for program planning. We conclude that research has documented specific benefits of students’ participation in international experiences; however, many of these studies are based on data collected immediately following the experience rather than longitudinal data. Our research synthesis provides a summary of benefits and program strategies for utilization by researchers in planning future research and by practitioners in planning future international experiences. Keywords: study abroad, international experience, benefit, cultural understanding, benchmark
Chapter
Neuroscience, as an academic concentration and area of research, has grown significantly in past decades and has influenced the content and methods of closely related fields. Psychology programs have expanded biopsychology course offerings, increased the hiring of faculty with neuroscience academic concentrations, and provide considerable emphasis on the biology of behavior in introductory psychology courses. The goals of this chapter are to provide instructors with an understanding of neuroscience content in psychology programs, outline the competencies that students gain from taking biopsychology courses, and offer teaching resources. The chapter begins with a review of the history of neuroscience, including its current role in psychology programs and in shaping undergraduate curriculum. We then outline biopsychology competencies and organize content into three core concepts: foundational knowledge of the nervous system, application of the foundational knowledge, and understanding the clinical/social impact. Each core concept is connected to prompts for addressing influential themes in biopsychology (scientific literacy, evolution, and neuroplasticity and adaptability). Example learning activities and teaching resources that align with core concepts and themes are provided. The final sections of the chapter discuss the opportunities, challenges, and lessons learned in teaching biopsychology with evidence-based pedagogical approaches, including self-regulated learning, active learning through the use of high-impact practices, centering professional development skills through course work, and tips for successful instruction.
Chapter
This chapter provides a framework for developing an undergraduate course in abnormal psychology. Authors make recommendations about how to structure the course and outline necessary competencies, including the M.A.P.S. framework for understanding the limits of diagnostic classification systems. By identifying challenges associated with defining abnormality, problems with a strict medical model for understanding mental illness, not understanding the etiology of symptoms, pigeonholing individuals, and only paying attention to superficial symptoms, the authors suggest ways to ensure that students view the classification of mental disorders through a critical lens and take a wider view of diagnosis. Concrete tools and sample activities are included to help instructors expand their teaching repertoire for abnormal psychology.
Article
This study examines the relationships between student engagement, college GPA, and persistence for 6,000 students attending 18 baccalaureate-granting institutions. Data sources included student-level information from the National Survey of Student Engagement, academic transcripts, merit aid, and ACT/SAT score reports. Engagement had positive, statistically significant effects on grades and persistence between the first and second year of study for students from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. Equally important, engagement had compensatory effects for historically underserved students in that they benefited more from participating in educationally purposeful activities in terms of earning higher grades and being more likely to persist.