Article

Quantum Crooks fluctuation theorem and quantum Jarzynski equality in the presence of a reservoir

01/2009;
Source: arXiv

ABSTRACT

We consider the quantum mechanical generalization of Crooks Fluctuation Theorem and Jarzynski Equality for an open quantum system. The explicit expression for microscopic work for an arbitrary prescribed protocol is obtained, and the relation between quantum Crooks Fluctuation Theorem, quantum Jarzynski Equality and their classical counterparts are clarified. Numerical simulations based on a two-level toy model are used to demonstrate the validity of the quantum version of the two theorems beyond linear response theory regime.

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