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The Rhetoric of Video Games

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... However, people who play video games not only watch, they also engage intensely through immersion and participation in the video games they play. Bogost (2007) gives an example of how video games have been used in the past and present as a work of art, as a source of titillation and relaxation, as exercise and habituation, and as a venue for promotion and politicking, among others. Video games, as a part of modern media, are more than just mere entertainment. ...
... In this article, the author describes politics as an activity and event reflected in how the real world works and what it brings to or the effects it has inside the video game (political campaigns, issues, or affairs between certain countries). This paper explores public policy and its political content or aspects inside video games, using Bogost (2007) and Chalmers ' (2018) procedural rhetoric and political marketing framework. Using those two concepts, the authors believe that any political aspect or content can be identified inside certain games. ...
... In The Rhetoric of Video Games, Ian Bogost explains how video games' rhetorical and persuasive mechanics can emphasize and amplify certain behaviors. Moreover, video games also aim to inform, educate, persuade, or motivate specific audiences in specific situations (Bogost, 2007). For example, gamers who play war games must abide by the rules as soldiers to avoid harsh punishment. ...
The study of video games can be fun, and it is interesting to see what players can explore inside video games. This paper explores public policy practice and its political content or aspects in video games. The very idea itself may sound vague and unclear; can such a thing be found inside a mere video game? To strengthen the argument of what kind of political aspects can be found in video games, the authors use a comparative case study, comparing two games: Animal Crossing: New Horizon and Genshin Impact. By comparing the two games, this paper forms an understanding of how political aspects are found inside each game and their influence on affairs and issues in certain countries. The result of this research shows that video games have become an election-winning strategic political marketing and communication policy. Video games have also used procedural rhetoric, which reveals how game producers promote certain ideologies through legislation and rules in their games.
... (Dormans, 2011). Há aqui uma chamada para que pesquisadores e desenvolvedores de jogos investiguem mais criticamente o aspecto retórico dos videogames e desafiem as normas consolidadas nesta indústria (Bogost, 2008;Flanagan, 2009 Videogames podem ser lidos como "expressões deliberadas de uma determinada perspectiva" (Bogost, 2008 ...
... (Dormans, 2011). Há aqui uma chamada para que pesquisadores e desenvolvedores de jogos investiguem mais criticamente o aspecto retórico dos videogames e desafiem as normas consolidadas nesta indústria (Bogost, 2008;Flanagan, 2009 Videogames podem ser lidos como "expressões deliberadas de uma determinada perspectiva" (Bogost, 2008 ...
Conference Paper
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Digital games are one of the main mass media of our time, whilst Game Design is an intensive knowledge activity that is being explored in different disciplines. So how do the disciplines that study knowledge are researching the creation of games? In order to do so, a multidisciplinary review was carried out, in a way that could help to create a general picture of connections between games and knowledge studies, which are already consolidated and others that are still being constructed.
... Tychsen and Canossa (2008) state that a game's possibility space structures the playstyle that players can adopt to facilitate the creation of their player persona. And Bogost (2008) mentions that the possibility space of play in general is all the gestures made possible by its rules. This makes the possibility space sound restricted, because designers structurally determine what is possible and what is not possible, according to Westecott (2009). ...
Thesis
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This study presents a theory about dynamic game characters within a broader character ecology in which characters are constantly produced and reproduced in a variety of media. Characters do not appear only in games, they migrate from one medium to another. They are independent from any medium in particular: a character does not require a specific medium to come into existence. Authoritative forces try to shape the overall interpretation of circulating characters transmedially in comics, television series, films, games and more through different venues of control, such as authorship, canonisation and ownership or intellectual property. This study addresses the struggle for interpretive authority by explaining how the player constructs the identity of dynamic game characters in digital games, and by discussing how dynamic game characters connect to and influence other character manifestations within a broader media ecology in which characters circulate. The research question of this study is: What are dynamic game characters? Through reader�response theory adapted for cybermedia phenomena such as games, this study approaches characters as a player-constructed phenomenon, in which the game character needs the player in order to be invoked, but the game encourages the meaning-making process with different means to different effects. Dynamic game characters are those game characters whose development structures branch into different outcomes, each of which are undetermined until the player actualises one or more possibilities that steer that direction onto distinct paths with a specific outcome. Dynamic game characters have become a phenomenon that challenges practices of (trans-)media control. A theory of dynamic game characters tells us about the migration of entities via different works, and how the perceiver comes to understand them within a context saturated with characters, stories and a variety of media platforms. Digital games are just one of the many media platforms that participate in this character ecology, and they allow characters to challenge the idea that within a single piece of work the character must maintain a linear, continuous and coherent identity that stretches the understanding of characters as authored and predictable within a single work. This study argues that dynamic game characters are a type of quasi-person in digital games whose development consists of multiple outcomes. Digital games accelerate a dynamic game character’s identity within a single work, unlike non-cybermedia in which a character’s identity is constructed over multiple works. They challenge venues of control, because the player has creative agency over the dynamic game character’s characterisation process within a single work. However, once dynamic game characters transfer to other works, authoritative institutions break the player’s participation in the dynamic game character’s development. These transfers sacrifice player participation to create the illusion of a coherent identity between the manifestations of the character over multiple works
... Several studies have argued that including feedback on actions within the game, so-called "learning by doing", increases learning (Bogost, 2008;Kolb, 2014;Solinska-Nowak et al., 2018;Terti et al., 2019). Therefore, we decided to create three rounds, which demonstrate disaster and DRR interactions and allow players to change their approach to DRM in each round. ...
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The increased complexity of disaster risk due to climate change, expected population growth and the increasing interconnectedness of disaster impacts across communities and economic sectors, require Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) measures that are better able to address these growing complexities. Especially Disaster Risk Management (DRM) practitioners need to be able to oversee these complexities. Nonetheless, in the traditional risk paradigm, there is a strong focus on single hazards and the risk faced by individual communities and economic sectors. Breaking the Silos is a serious game designed to support various stakeholders (including policy makers, risk managers, researchers) in understanding and managing the complexities of DRR measures in a multi-(hazard) risk setting, thereby moving away from hazard-silo thinking. What sets Breaking the Silos apart from other disaster risk games, is its explicit focus on multi-risk challenges. The game includes different hazard types, intensities, and their interactions, different impact indicators, and (a)synergies between DRR measures. Moreover, the spread of expert knowledge between different participants and the high levels of freedom and randomness in the game design contribute to a realistic game. The game was successfully launched during the World Bank GFDRR’s Understanding Risk 2020 Forum and later played again with the same settings with researchers from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. Before and after playing the games, participants were asked to complete surveys asking them about their perception of the challenges of DRM and whether the game raised their awareness of these challenges. The preliminary findings indicate that Breaking the Silos was found useful by the participants in increasing awareness of the complexities of risk.
... 4-5). Tout d'abord, rappelons que les concepts de « présence » et de « distance » peuvent être compris de diffé-19 Cf. à cet égardBogost (2008) et son concept de « rhétorique » : « Some games' procedural representations serve mostly to create an entertainment experience, a fantastic situation that transports the player to another world. But other games use procedurality to make claims about the cultural, social, or material aspects of human experience. ...
Book
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Las tecnologías están en constante evolución y la democratización de los vídeo juegos, de los sistemas de realidad virtual, realidad aumentada o de las herramientas de vídeos interactivos cuestionan nuestras prácticas de enseñanza y nos llevan a reconsiderar la forma de concebir experiencias inmersivas en lenguas extranjeras. Hoy, la inmersión cultural o lingüística en el aula es posible gracias al uso de tecnologías inmersivas e interactivas que permiten estimular el aprendizaje y la motivación del alumnado. Esta obra presenta proyectos realizados en aulas de idiomas y hace un análisis de la situación, de conceptos claves y de algunas estas tecnologías.
... Los videojuegos podrían facilitar la radicalización violenta porque los avatares personalizados permiten a los jugadores participar en experiencias de dominio virtual -prácticas cognitivas de actos violentos, lo que podría aumentar su autoeficacia percibida en relación con la violencia en el mundo real (Schlegel 2020). Estas experiencias, denominadas espacios de posibilidades por Ian Bogost (2008), permiten ciertas representaciones del mundo ordinario que posibilitan crear un entorno simulado donde el jugador pueda pensar críticamente o identificarse plenamente con la problemática representada. Sybille Lammes (2008) va más allá y relaciona los videojuegos con el concepto de nodo mágico, ya que considera que los espacios de juego no están separados del mundo ordinario, sino que ambos mundos forman nodos de una amplia red social que se retroalimenta. ...
Article
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En la era digital, los videojuegos se han transformado en una herramienta propagandística de primera magnitud, empleándose con fines políticos por parte de agentes estatales y diferentes organismos, incluyendo grupos extremistas. De igual manera, algunos títulos han vertebrado sus narrativas con un propósito educativo y concienciador, denunciando la sinrazón y la violencia de diferentes agrupaciones terroristas. En el presente artículo presentaremos un marco teórico general sobre cómo se ha utilizado el videojuego en la guerra virtual del terrorismo, ya sea a favor de este o combatiéndolo, mediante creaciones ex profeso o a través de modificaciones de famosos juegos bélicos. Seguidamente, incluiremos un estudio de caso referido a España, analizando la representación en este medio videolúdico de la problemática de ETA o de los atentados yihadistas del 11-M. Como resultado preliminar, queremos destacar la importancia de este formato interactivo en la actualidad, ya sea desde un punto de vista propagandístico, educativo o informativo.
... ACNH is a life simulation game released in March 2020 that incorporates economic principles of production, trade, and consumption (Hansen, 2020). The Animal Crossing series, which was first released in 2001, has faced criticisms for its capitalist logic (Bogost, 2008;Vossen, 2020). In the game, players need to extract the island's resources such as tree products (fruit and wood), fish, and bugs to make money, craft, upgrade the island, and complete tasks. ...
Article
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Video games have long been considered an effective educational tool. Environmental education studies have found that games positively affect the feeling of nature connectedness, producing pro-environmental attitudes and behaviors. With growing urbanization, video games also provide chances to interact with nature. During the COVID-19 lockdown, Nintendo’s Animal Crossing: New Horizon (ACNH) became a household name, with millions of copies sold worldwide. The article used the Bayesian multilevel model to analyze 640 survey responses of ACNH game players from various online communities. The correlations between the perception of limited resources and virtual planting and exploiting behaviors with the varying effect among ethnicities were explored. The findings suggested positive correlations between the perception and in-game actions among all ethnicities, regardless of whether the actions are planting or exploiting. While further evidence is needed, the findings suggest the restraints of game mechanics. To foster a pro-environmental culture, stakeholders can consider video games a novel technological aid to environmental education.
... It might be easy to brush off the impact of video games and default to the notion that play is for the sake of play itself, but it is crucial to recognize and accept that the procedural rhetorics described by Bogost will never be neutral. 38 The rhetoric encoded in games attempts to make and uphold claims about what the best course of action should be and how players should go about achieving their goals to fit a particular ideological mold. There will, thus, always be something at stake in regards to how players-many of whom are college-aged students-critically engage with their consumption of commercialized games and other new media objects/texts. ...
... which can be explored through play. " [18] This conception of modernity closely By using this website, you agree to our use of cookies. We use cookies to provide you with a great experience and to help our website run effectively. ...
Article
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With the rise in popularity of video games and gamification, it is more necessary than ever to establish how play creates meaning and shapes persuasive and expressive thought. This paper utilizes games studies theory and visual rhetoric to develop a ludic literacy which allows for a greater understanding of how play engages limits and conditions to create a specific message. Through a close reading of The Witness (Thekla, Inc., 2016), I show how ludic literacy enables an understanding of how games differ from traditional media forms in their creation and use of imagewords breaking down the boundaries between words and images through symbolization.
... The other unique quality of digital games invoked by Arjoranta -their procedurality -can be described as the potential to represent processes; in Arjoranta's text, it relates to Ian Bogost's infl uential theory of procedural rhetoric. Bogost (2007Bogost ( , 2008 claims that meaning in games is directly linked to their rules -a game is composed of sets of rules, against which the player's behavior is executed. Rules regulate the options the player has for how to behave, but also serve as the basis for an ongoing feedback loop between the player and the game, guiding what happens in the gameplay. ...
Article
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The article undertakes a detailed analysis of The Day the Laughter Stopped – a simple text-based browser game about rape, told from the perspective of a young teenage girl. While seemingly straightforward, the game uses choice poetics to build expectations of agency on the side of the player, only to subvert them at the most climactic moment, provoking emotional responses and serving as a commentary on the experience of loss of control and loss of words in the face of a traumatic event. Following existing approaches to rhetorical, emotion-evoking qualities and capabilities of digital games, the article explores the potential of the digital medium to communicate the unspeakable, overwhelming dimension of trauma, as illustrated by the game. The analysis not only explores the medium-specific means of expression which the game utilizes to encourage the audience to explore the perspective of a rape victim in an engaging way, but also leads to the conclusion that in doing so, the game aims to make persuasive statements about the social and cultural discourse around rape trauma and its representations, and therefore contributes to the larger socio-cultural discourse. As such, the article aspires to add to pre-existing studies on the specific rhetorical means of digital fiction, as well as on the approaches to cultural renditions of trauma.
... Marsh (2011) sugiere que mientras el propósito tenga cierto grado de éxito para influir, informar, persuadir o transmitir, la cuestión del predominio del entretenimiento no debería tener importancia. Bogost (2008) ofrece el concepto de procedural rhetoric para capturar la noción de que los videojuegos construyen significado al hacer "afirmaciones sobre el mundo, que los jugadores pueden comprender, evaluar y deliberar". 8 Considera los procesos adscritos dentro de los sistemas de reglas y el juego como un espacio para explorar las posibilidades que brindan las reglas al manipular sistemas simbólicos (Bogost, 2010). ...
Article
Organizaciones internacionales han encargado la producción de videojuegos para crear conciencia sobre el desarrollo económico y los problemas humanitarios, estableciendo redes basadas en la empatía intergrupal y las diversas realidades que enfrentan los jugadores. Sin embargo, existe una brecha en el estudio de los juegos digitales como herramientas que pueden mejorar la empatía entre grupos y las implicaciones del discurso que tienen estos juegos sobre la otredad. El propósito de este artículo es explorar las formas en que los videojuegos construyen nociones de alteridad arraigadas en el pensamiento colonial, posicionando a los desarrolladores y jugadores como reproductores de esta retórica. Este artículo explorará el concepto de empatía y cómo los videojuegos serios pueden usarse como herramientas para fomentarlo. Luego, se usa el juego EVOKE para ejemplificar este género y resaltar sus limitaciones. Finalmente, se ofrece una alternativa para fomentar la empatía a través de videojuegos serios dentro de un proyecto decolonial. La importancia del proyecto radica en reunir los campos del estudio de juegos y del cambio social a través de la empatía y proponer una lente decolonial a través de la cual reconocer las relaciones problemáticas entre los juegos para el cambio y la empatía.
Chapter
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This chapter provides the syllabus, rationale and discussion regarding making an introductory game studies course in a media studies program at the Communications school.
Thesis
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Video games have been used for a wide range of purposes, from pure entertainment to training surgeons. This study researches the use of games as a promotional tool for tourism. Previous games, such as Assassins Creed, have been shown to have a positive effect on tourism for real-world locations. I developed a small prototype of a tourism game related to a Croatian jousting event and wanted to determine its effectiveness. Players were asked to complete a survey before playing the game. After a week, the players were instructed to fill in the survey once again and the results were compared to the first survey. The surveys utilise indirect questioning, so the participants are not fully aware of the purpose of the study, to minimise potential bias. The study found that, even after a week, the “T.O.M. Awareness” of the game’s location and premise had remained, with the player showing a 20% increase in awareness of Croatia, and a 10% awareness of jousting. There was also a marginal increase in willingness to visit the game’s location. With a certainty of 80% and a margin of error of approximately 15%, the study indicates that further research is needed in this field.
Article
Can gaming be considered narrative? Should gaming be allowed in a pedagogical space? Tabletop roleplaying games are probably not the first thing that come to mind when thinking about how to innovate narrative structure and teaching composition. Often considered a nerdy pastime, participants ridiculed for playing pretend and caring about imaginary characters, TTRPGs have nonetheless entered a sort of renaissance in recent years. While video games have slowly become more incorporated into pedagogy by teaching students more abstract concepts of interactivity with narrative, audience, and player engagement, TTRPGs have been slower on the draw. But incorporating the highly interactive and freeform narrative structure into composition curriculum is far from impossible. In addition to helping students break out of their comfort zones, TTRPG-like assignments can help build community and strengthen communication skills, allow students to explore ownership and leadership in group work, and teach real-time improvisation and problem-solving techniques. TTRPGs are a vastly underestimated and underutilized form of narrative structure and innovation, and deserve consideration as a valid form of composition and pedagogy for practical and theoretical applications.
Article
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Cinematic adaptations of videogames are an increasingly common feature of film culture, and the adaptive relationship between these mediums is an increasingly common subject of film and videogame studies. However, our ability to historicize and theorize that relationship is hampered by a failure to fully define the generic character of our object of study. This essay asks, what is a videogame movie? It argues that film scholars (1) have not considered the full range of ways videogames have been represented in film; (2) have not attended fully to the historical, technological, figurative, and social dimensions of videogames; and therefore (3) have limited the set of possible texts that comprise the genre “videogame cinema.” The essay recommends a tropological approach to the problem, defining six tropes that comprise the “videogame movie” as a genre, and applying them to two films, Her and 1917, neither of them a direct adaptation of a videogame, the latter not “about” or referencing videogames in any way, yet both exemplary of a broadened concept of “videogame cinema”.
Article
This article examines the generation of digital outer space natures in the space exploration game, No Man’s Sky. Using procedural generation, No Man’s Sky offers nearly infinite planets, flora, and fauna on the fly. With the rapid development of gaming technology and tools, game developers and others are attempting to diversify the representation of various forms of nature in gaming content and to expand the use of games in behavioral change, education, conservation, and other fields. Many scholars argue that games offer promising ways for various publics to understand their place and their interconnectedness with microbes, ecosystems, planet Earth, and beyond. We examine how No Man’s Sky struggled to coproduce digital outer space natures at the two scalar extremes of the vast expanse of outer space and of the embodied player relating within complex biomes. Our results from an in-depth, qualitative analysis of the initial version of the game, of player world-building experiences in No Man’s Sky, and of subsequent developer modifications to the game demonstrate that nonscalability theory is useful for studying what digital outer space natures do in games. We also argue that nonscalability theory would benefit from a more robust engagement with the digital. No Man’s Sky was initially scalable to such an extreme that it made players into objects without an origin story, broader purpose or way to build meaningful relations in the game. For a brief period, this game undermined players’ interplanetary colonial imaginaries. Subsequent updates to the game introduced a limited scope of nonscalability, but only to the extent of satisfying gamers’ desires to become more impactful agents of exploration. We see great potential for analyzing the role of innovations in computing and game design in linking multiscalar digital, outer, and earth spaces, which as other scholars have shown, bear significantly on our understanding of multiple worlds and natures.
Chapter
The terms “glocalization” and “glocalized” refer to the increased rate of interconnectivity of local communities with the rest of the world and the interplay of global and local trends. This chapter addresses the global influences on local youth cultural scenes and their global connections as well as local manifestations and characteristics. Using empirical data as well as existing literature, the chapter describes and discusses in which ways four specific youth cultural activities on social media have a more global character or a more local character. The four youth cultural activities are self-presentation on Instagram, playing multi-player online games, self-production of music videos on TikTok, and political participation on Facebook and YouTube. The results show that these youth cultures on social media have a strong global character but local manifestations in certain contexts. The discussion leads to assume that local references are more important in political (youth cultural) contexts than in contexts such as video selfies on TikTok which mainly refer to the globalized pop-culture.
Chapter
Authors aim at showing how abstract notions can be translated to game elements without losing their meaning. Authors provide a detailed explanation of the process of translating models of real-life systems into rules and elements of a board game. Furthermore, the authors provide a state-of-the-art on overview of board games that deal with sustainability issues, focusing on their advantages and disadvantage that were identified based on the past research on serious games.
Book
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The goal of this edited book is to bring together gaming faculty and course developers to present and talk about their syllabi. There are three objectives for such a goal. First, anyone interested in teaching a gaming course will be able to browse this edited volume to find course ideas. Second, we believe in the value of teaching with and through games. Rather than seeing this as a competition, we believe that the more courses that are created, the stronger the field. This book will allow for strengthening of all gaming courses. Stronger courses will lead to bigger programs and more graduates to positively influence our field. Third, our field is changing. A collection of game syllabi will allow scholars to look across multiple contexts and disciplines to understand how gaming is perceived and taught. In this edited volume, readers will be able to hear from successful instructors while they also see detailed course outlines (by week or module) that help them craft better gaming courses. More specifically, they will be able to explore multiple aspects of course syllabi including: the catalog description, course purposes and objectives, context, pedagogy, assignments, assessment, an expanded course outline, a set of best practices for instruction, and authors’ descriptions of potential future changes to make the course stronger.
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Following the work on meaningful mechanics, we propose, in this article, to account for the experiential dimension of game mechanics. We develop a research method from the affective and semiotic effects produced by the interaction between the game and the players. The playful experience is considered an act of dialogical language and immanent to a context of transmission and reception between the designers and the players. With this communicational and pragmatist approach, we conceived the game as a semiotic process where the mechanics act as grammar (syntactic level) to produce meaning (semantic level) specific to a situation (pragmatic level). By dividing the study of the playful experience into three levels of language, it becomes possible to report the actions and feedback of the game system and the emotional and semiotic effects in a context each time renewed by the players.
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Esports have increased in popularity among young people over the past decade. There is evidence that involvement in esports helps young players to develop skills that are needed in 21st century societies and increasingly valued by employers. However, there has been no systematic investigation of what 21st century skills can be developed through esports participation and how these skills are acquired through esports. This paper presents a systematic review of the literature for the purpose of providing a holistic understanding of the impact of esports on the development of 21st century skills in young people. The review focuses on the methodologies employed in esports research, the effects of different types of esports games on the development of various skills, the mechanics embodied in esports through which these skills are acquired and the potential negative effects and trade-offs of esports participation. The findings show that the literature has paid most attention to collaboration and communication skills, with less focus on other life and career skills related to creativity and innovation, information literacy and citizenship. The review also reveals the possibility of transferring acquired skills, such as those in leadership and communication, to the real-world context. Further research is needed on the transferability of a wider range of skills from esports to broader settings, on instruments and designs for examining the value of esports for educational purposes, and other areas that are not well covered in the literature. Identifying the skill development potential of esports has implications for designing specific skill development programmes for students, making pedagogical innovations for teachers’ professional development and empowering educational change at the school level.
Article
Una aproximación sobre los principales debates académicos y científicos actuales con relación a los videojuegos, se constituye en un necesario insumo para advertir las tendencias en las cuales se pueden inscribir los proyectos que surgen para comprender este fenómeno social, cultural y político. Este es el problema que constituye el presente estudio. Se hace un énfasis en la producción académica e investigativa de los últimos 30 años, por ser el tiempo en el que comienza la gesta por consolidar un campo académico, interdisciplinario y autónomo sobre los estudios del videojuego (games studies). Se concluyen tres tendencias centrales, de las que se derivan muchas otras líneas de investigación; a saber, el problema del videojuego, los efectos de los videojuegos y el videojuego como expresión cultural.
Thesis
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This thesis aims to semiotically model hyperreality in contemporary digitized society and beyond into the burgeoning Web 3.0 era of ubiquitous virtuality. The upcoming Web 3.0, as an evolution of the current digital space, leads us to an evolution of hyperreality (where the virtual is more real than reality). We call this next step “hypervirtuality” as a portmanteau of “virtual” and “hyperreality”, where the physical becomes a meaningless canvas, overlaid by digital information, which is itself appended by virtual spheres of digital signs that attempt to differentiate themselves from the mundane digital world. We investigate virtual reality, augmented reality, and mixed reality models, stating that virtual reality and augmented reality lack the interaction with the physical space to create hypervirtuality, but mixed reality could overlay the physical with a digital layer of information that increasingly becomes more significant and symbolic than mundane physicality. These spaces can replicate the physical or exaggerate the virtual, pointedly marking themselves as more virtual-than-virtual. The transmediality of identity between the user and their avatar is one of the last relationships where the physical, offline, signs form a primary foundation to the semiotic communication model. Our thesis concluded that an enhanced digital literacy education within the classroom would enable the contextualisation of self within the physical space, thus avoiding the loss of the physical sign as a meaningful part of one’s identity schema. The virtual space should add meaning and not replace offline signs completely.
Article
A játékokkal kapcsolatos pszichológiai kutatások középpontjában többek között az érzelmi folyamatok feltérképezése áll, amelyek egyrészt a játékok irányításával függenek össze (gameplay érzelmek), másrészt pedig az avatárral való azonosulásból fakadnak, azaz a játékvilágban megvalósuló cselekvésekhez kapcsolódnak (diegetikus érzelmek). Jelen tanulmányban ezeknek az érzelmi folyamatoknak az egymásra hatását vizsgáljuk a túlélő-horror játékok műfajában, amelyek játékdizájnja speciálisan a félelemválaszok kiváltását célozza. Érvelésünk szerint a túlélő-horror játékokban a félelem kiváltásának hatékony eszközei a játékélmény és irányítás különböző módszerekkel történő befolyásolása, illetve az avatár cselekvési és érzékelési lehetőségeinek korlátozása. Jelen írásban amellett érvelünk, hogy ezen paraméterek módosítása, legalábbis kognitív pszichológiai megközelítésben, nem csökkenti radikálisan és szükségszerű módon a játékos cselekvőképességét.
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Game-based learning has been increasingly touted as the model solution to challenges of learning for students, particularly in the discipline of History. Often regarded dry and boring due to the need to memorise names, events and places, learning history is compounded by its methodological complexity. To help students to model historical variables, Kurt Squire has extensively deployed Civilization as a game-based learning environment. Squire’s research findings are encouraging, especially concerning motivation and engagement. Yet it seems that the ideological persuasion underpinning the game mechanics of Civilization has not been given due consideration in students’ learning outcomes. As a simulated model of World history, Civilization is slanted towards an uncritical representation of European domination and subjugation of other indigenous populations. These conflicting aspects highlight the concealed paradox of game-based learning. On one hand, games can facilitate learners by functioning as vibrant simulation tools for historical understanding; on the other hand, game-based learning demands sophisticated skills to facilitate historical imagination.
Article
The goal of this study is to introduce and evaluate a novel online simulation method built upon buyer-seller roleplay in a private social network for housing economics education. This is at a time when classroom disruptions due to COVID-19 require new methods to engage with students asynchronously. While methods like game-based learning simulations show potential to engage, they are often high-fidelity and require high setup costs. This is also the case for existing housing simulation games, for which besides being single player mode, costs for technical customization and learning curve reduces adoption in the classroom. In this context, the use of social networks to facilitate a low-fidelity buyer-seller housing roleplay may provide flexible learning goals and peer engagement, but its implementation is unclear. This gap in knowledge has motivated this investigation, for which undergraduate students in Hong Kong participated in property buyer-seller roleplay. Students posted available property and buyers bid for them using comments on a private social media app, Soqqle. Post-course reflective essays suggest that various student needs were met, indicating that the setup supports flexible learning outcomes. Authentic learning outcomes like knowledge transfer, reflection, challenge, and realism were also experienced. Further, although statistically insignificant due to lack of observations, a regression analysis shows that experiencing and overcoming challenges (β = 3.996, p =.082) provides the biggest learning outcome (R² = 0.325). A focus group with other simulation practitioners suggests the benefits of this method could extend to them. The findings of this study can benefit practitioners of game-based learning looking for quick and easy methods to introduce online roleplay for real-life scenarios in their classes.
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http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/107702/1/mtoner.pdf
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Guía de referencia para el diseño conceptual de un videojuego, donde se ofrecen los marcos teóricos para construir el juego como un sistema de información que necesita administrar los datos estratégicamente para crear una experiencia de juego (historia, placer, simulación y sentido) en el usuario.
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In this paper, we present a new method of simulating and visualizing smoke and steam clouds in virtual environments (VEs). We use a particle system approach, but reduce the particle numbers to decrease the computation and rendering times. Special care, however is taken for the presentation quality of the clouds. From every viewing point (even within the clouds), the VE user does not have the impression that the clouds are hollow polyhedrons, but rather fuzzy objects.
  • Animal Nintendo
  • Crossing
Nintendo, Animal Crossing (Kyoto, Japan: Nintendo, 2002); and idem., Animal Crossing: Wild World (Kyoto, Japan: Nintendo, 2005).
La disparition, trans. Georges Perec (Paris: Gallimard, 1990); and idem., La disparition
  • Idem
Idem., La disparition, trans. Georges Perec (Paris: Gallimard, 1990); and idem., La disparition, trans. Gilbert Adair (Boston: Verba Mundi, 2005).
  • Chris Crawford
Chris Crawford, Process Intensity, The Journal of Computer Game Development 1, no. 5 (1987).
  • Sonja K Foss
  • Karen A Foss
  • Robert Trapp
Sonja K. Foss, Karen A. Foss, and Robert Trapp, Contemporary Perspectives on Rhetoric (Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press, 1985), 214.
Hot Off the Grill: La Molleindustria's Paolo Pedercini on the McDonald's Video Game
  • Patrick Dugan
Patrick Dugan, Hot Off the Grill: La Molleindustria's Paolo Pedercini on the McDonald's Video Game, Gamasutra February 27, 2006. http://www.gamasutra.com/features/20060227/dugan pfv.htm.
  • Karl Marx
Karl Marx, Capital: Vol. 1, A Critique of Political Economy, trans. Ben Fowkes (New York: Penguin, 1992), 166-67. The translation here has been modified.
  • Rockstar Vancouver
and Rockstar Vancouver, Bully (New York: Take Two, 2006).
What's Next in Content? Paper presented at the Game Developers Conference
  • Will Wright
Will Wright, What's Next in Content? Paper presented at the Game Developers Conference, San Jose, CA, 2006.