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"A Genetic Interpretation of Neo-Pythagorean Arithmetic"

Oriens - Occidens Cahiers du Centre d’histoire des Sciences et des philosophies arabes et Médiévales 01/2010; 7:113-154.
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Available from: Ioannis M. Vandoulakis
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