Article

Isolation and Genome Analysis of Single Virions using 'Single Virus Genomics'

Department of Microbial and Environmental Genomics, The J. Craig Venter Institute.
Journal of Visualized Experiments (Impact Factor: 1.33). 06/2013; 75(75). DOI: 10.3791/3899
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Whole genome amplification and sequencing of single microbial cells enables genomic characterization without the need of cultivation (1-3). Viruses, which are ubiquitous and the most numerous entities on our planet (4) and important in all environments (5), have yet to be revealed via similar approaches. Here we describe an approach for isolating and characterizing the genomes of single virions called 'Single Virus Genomics' (SVG). SVG utilizes flow cytometry to isolate individual viruses and whole genome amplification to obtain high molecular weight genomic DNA (gDNA) that can be used in subsequent sequencing reactions.

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