Herpetological investigations in Phang-Nga Province, southern Peninsular Thailand, with a list of reptile species and notes on their biology

Article (PDF Available)inDumerilia 4(2):123-154 · January 2000with 657 Reads
Abstract
Preliminary investigations in Phang-Nga Province, southern peninsular Thailand, conducted during a collaborative project between the Royal Forest Department of Thailand and the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle of Paris, provided a total of 92 reptile species (11 turtles, one crocodile, 32 lizards and 48 snakes), of which 46 are new records for the province. The list is based on museum specimens, literature records, and observations and new material gathered in the field. The records of Gekko monarchus, Gekko smithii (Gekkonidae) and Tropidophorus robinsoni (Scincidae) represent important range extensions. The unconfirmed presence of several additional species is discussed. Data on biology of collected specimens and local vernacular names are provided when available.
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