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Air negative ion concentration in different modes of courtyard forests in southern mountainous areas of Jinan, Shandong Province of East China

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Abstract

Taking five typical courtyard forests and a non-forest courtyard in southern mountains areas of Jinan as test objects, a synchronous observation was conducted on the air negative ion concentration and related meteorological factors in March-December, 2010. The air negative ion concentration in the test courtyards showed an obvious seasonal variation, being in the order of summer > autumn > spring > winter. The diurnal variation of the air negative ion concentration presented a double peak curve, with the maximum in 10:00 - 11:00 and 16:00 - 17:00 and the minimum around 12:00. The daily air quality was the best at 10:00 and 16:00, and better in afternoon than in the morning. Summer time and garden sketch mode had the best air quality in a year. The mean annual air negative ion and the coefficient of air ion (CI) of the test courtyards were in the order of garden sketch > economic fruit forest > natural afforested forest > flowers and bonsai > farm tourist > non-forest, with the air negative ion concentration being 813, 745, 695, 688, 649, and 570 ions.cm-3, and the CI being 1.22, 1.11, 0.85, 0.84, 0.83, and 0.69, respectively. It could be concluded that garden sketch was the ideal courtyard forest mode. The air negative ion concentration was significantly positively correlated with air temperature and relative humidity, but irrelevant to light intensity.

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