Article

Use of calorie information at fast food and chain restaurants among US youth aged 918 years, 2010

CDC/NCCPHP/Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity/Obesity Prevention and Control Branch, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.
Journal of Public Health (Impact Factor: 2.04). 05/2013; 35(3). DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdt049
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background:
To examine whether youth use calorie information when it is available at fast food/chain restaurants and what factors are associated with using this information to make their food selection.

Methods:
A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on a sample of 721 youth (9-18 years) using the 2010 YouthStyles and HealthStyles surveys. The outcome measure was reported use of calorie information at fast food/chain restaurants. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the associations between sociodemographic variables and the use of calorie information at fast food/chain restaurants.

Results:
Of those who visited fast food/chain restaurants, 42.4% reported using calorie information at least sometimes. Girls were more likely than boys (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.5) and youth who were obese were more likely than those at a healthy weight (aOR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.04-2.9) to use calorie information, and youth eating at a fast food/chain restaurant twice a week or more versus once a week or less were half as likely to report using calorie information (aOR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.4-0.8).

Conclusion:
Public health education efforts can benefit from research to determine how to increase usage among youth so that their food choices are appropriate for their caloric needs.

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  • No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · Journal of Adolescent Health
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine reading and use of calorie information at fast-food/chain restaurants. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on a sample of 4363 US adults using the 2009 HealthStyles survey. The outcome variable was reading calorie information when available while ordering at fast-food/chain restaurants. Among those who go to fast-food/chain restaurants, we conducted multivariable logistic regression to examine associations between sociodemographic variables and reading calorie information when available. Among those who report reading calorie information when available, we assessed the proportion using calorie information. Among those who reported eating at fast-food/chain restaurants, 36.4% reported reading calorie information when available. Reading calorie information was not related to race/ethnicity, income or education. Compared with men, women had higher odds [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-2.1] of reading calorie information when available while those who frequented fast-food/chain restaurants ≥3 times/week (aOR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.4-0.8) had lower odds compared with those going <4 times/month. Of those who reported reading calorie information when available, 95.4% reported using calorie information at least sometimes. Almost all who read calorie information when available use the information at least sometimes. Research is needed on how calorie information is being used.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Journal of Public Health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Fast food establishments are available on many college campuses and, as a result, many students consume foods that are high in calories and contribute to unhealthy weight gain. Purpose: This study measured college students' knowledge of the calorie content for fast food items and whether the provision of calorie information for those foods influenced their future purchasing intentions. Method: Randomly selected undergraduate college students (N = 201) completed an online survey that measured baseline knowledge of calorie content for a fast food item and intention to purchase that item in the future. After provision of accurate calorie information, students were posttested for intention to purchase that item in the future. Results: The majority of students underestimated calorie content for fast food items. After receiving accurate calorie information, those who initially underestimated calorie content were significantly more likely to change their intention to purchase that food item in the future. Discussion: Many college students are interested in avoiding high-calorie fast food items but are uninformed about calorie content. Translation to Health Education Practice: Colleges should provide calorie information for fast food items at the point of purchase so that students can make informed decisions that will promote their health.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015