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The Physiological Effect of Color on the Suppression of Human Aggression: Research on Baker-Miller Pink

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  • AIBMR Life Sciences Inc.

Abstract

It is hypothesized that a newly discovered color, Baker-Miller Pink, has a measurable and predictable effect on reducing physiological variables associated with aggression in subjects of normal intelligence. Studies at one U.S. Naval correctional facility, two California county correctional centers, and two state and federal psychiatric hospitals confirm these preliminary findings. In several controlled university studies the effect has been found to be significant but the magnitude of effect small. The effect has also been seen in both the non-visually impaired, those color-blind, and some blind subjects, suggesting a physiological mechanism. The possible physiological processes believed to be involved are unknown, however, undetermined neurochemicals in the eye communicating with the hypothalamic center as suspected. A color swatch is available and mixing directions for the color are provided, as it has been found that the precise shade is essential in accurately assessing outcomes.
... The omnipresence of colors and their associations raises the question, if color can cause specific effects on humans' perception and behavior. In the 1970s Alexander Schauss proposed a pink hue, the later called Baker-Miller pink, which he regarded to unfold a broad impact on humans within 15 minutes exposure [1]- [2]: ...
... First observations with pink colored prison detention cells seemed to support these effects [2]. As a result, prison detention cells all over the world were painted with Baker-Miller pink [3]. ...
... In addition, as the color-in-context theory [9] proposes, psychological context plays an important role in color effects. Of course, the present laboratory setting differs completely from a real-life prison setting, for which Schauss [2] reported results of calming and aggression reducing effects of Baker-Miller pink. Nevertheless, this is not the first study which fails in replicating the proposed effects, even in the same context [3], arguing against a specific prison context effect. ...
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Besides aesthetic aspects, color can have impact on human perception and behaviour. A special pink hue, the so-called Baker-Miller pink, is assumed to induce calming effects. In this study, we evaluated pink and white lighting conditions with N = 29 subjects, through tests of attention, measurements of skin conductance and emotional state ratings. With an exposure time of 15 minutes including measurements, no color effect was found in skin conductance and attentional performance. There was also no difference in ratings of emotional valence and arousal between the two lighting conditions. Although, subjects rated Baker-Miller pink light significantly less activating than white light. A significant sex effect showed that women preferred pink light more than men. These results indicate that there are indeed differences in subjective perception of white and Baker-Miller pink light although they cannot be found in objective measures of physiological and cognitive processes.
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... This result is in line with prior research that argues that the overall effect of packaging comes from all elements interacting with each other in a holistic manner (Orth & Malkewitz, 2008). However, the lack of a physiological effect of colours may seem inconsistent with the findings of prior studies that found colours produce emotional responses when measured with physiological measures (Jacobs & Hustmyer Jr., 1974;Schauss, 1985). A possible explanation is that in these studies the coloured stimuli were excessively overwhelming (e.g. ...
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