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Available from: Katia Mareschi, Aug 11, 2014
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    • "Mesenchymal stem cells are very attractive in view of a possible cell therapy approach in neurodegenerative diseases because of their great plasticity. Recently, MSCs therapy has been shifted to be used in some clinical trial models like ALS [48, 49]. A phase I clinical trial conducted by Mazzini confirmed that MSCs transplantation into the spinal cord of ALS patients is safe and that MSCs might have a clinical use for future ALS cell-based clinical trials [48]. "
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    ABSTRACT: The present study aims to evaluate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grafts on cognition deficit in chemically and age-induced Alzheimer's models of rats. In the first experiments aged animals (30 months) were tested in Morris water maze (MWM) and divided into two groups: impaired memory and unimpaired memory. Impaired groups were divided into two groups and cannulated bilaterally at the CA1 of the hippocampus for delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (500 × 10(3)/μL) and PBS (phosphate buffer saline). In the second experiment, Ibotenic acid (Ibo) was injected bilaterally into the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) of young rats (3 months) and animals were tested in MWM. Then, animals with memory impairment received the following treatments: MSCs (500 × 10(3)/μL) and PBS. Two months after the treatments, cognitive recovery was assessed by MWM in relearning paradigm in both experiments. Results showed that MSCs treatment significantly increased learning ability and memory in both age- and Ibo-induced memory impairment. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells show promise in treating cognitive decline associated with aging and NBM lesions.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2012
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    ABSTRACT: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating incurable disease. Stem-cell-based therapies represent a new possible strategy for ALS clinical research. The objectives of this Phase 1 clinical study were to assess the feasibility and toxicity of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and to test the impact of a cell therapy in ALS patients. The trial was approved and monitored by the National Institute of Health and by the Ethics Committees of all participating Institutions. Autologous MSCs were isolated from bone marrow, expanded in vitro and analyzed according to GMP conditions. Expanded MSCs were suspended in the autologous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and directly transplanted into the spinal cord at a high thoracic level with a surgical procedure. Ten ALS patients were enrolled and regularly monitored before and after transplantation by clinical, psychological, neuroradiological and neurophysiological assessments. There was no immediate or delayed transplant-related toxicity. Clinical, laboratory, and radiographic evaluations of the patients showed no serious transplant-related adverse events. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed no structural changes (including tumor formation) in either the brain or the spinal cord. However the lack of post mortem material prevents any definitive conclusion about the vitality of the MSCs after transplantation. In conclusion, this study confirms that MSC transplantation into the spinal cord of ALS patients is safe and that MSCs might have a clinical use for future ALS cell based clinical trials.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2009 · Experimental Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, leading to permanent paralysis and loss of sensation below the site of the injury. Cell replacement therapy has provided the basis for the development of potentially powerful new therapeutic strategies for a broad spectrum of human neurological diseases. In recent years, neurons and glial cells have successfully been generated from stem cells, and extensive efforts by investigators to develop stem cellbased brain transplantation therapies have been carried out. We review here notable previously published experimental and preclinical studies involving stem cell-based cell for neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the future prospects for stem cell therapy of neurological disorders in the clinical setting. Steady and solid progress in stem cell research in both basic and preclinical settings should support the hope for development of stem cell-based cell therapies for neurological diseases.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Molecules
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