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Colour Beyond the Sky:: The Chromatic Revolution in Astronomy

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  • Imachination Projects
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Abstract

The essay shows how since the invention of the telescope the sky not only came closer but also more colourful. The contribution highlights spectroscopy triggering a chromatic revolution which changed astronomy into astrophysics. But we are also looking for possible answers why colour was introduced in astronomical pictures such late in the second half of the 20th century. Above all the essay also refers to the history of art and ideas, and asks beyond that, if "true colours" in any kind of picture can really exist.

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