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Chemical Composition and in vitro Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Citrus aurantium L. Flowers Essential Oil (Neroli Oil)

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Chemical Composition and in vitro Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Citrus aurantium L. Flowers Essential Oil (Neroli Oil)

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Neroli essential oil is extracted from the fragrant blossoms of the bitter orange tree. It is one of the most widely used floral oils in perfumery. In this study chemical composition and in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of neroli oil are investigated. The essential oil of fresh Citrus aurantium L. Flowers (Neroli oil) cultivated in North East of Tunisia (Nabeul) were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. 33 compounds were identified, representing 99% of the total oil. Limonene (27.5%) was the main component followed by (E)-nerolidol (17.5%), α-terpineol (14%), α-terpinyl acetate (11.7%) and (E,E)-farnesol (8%). Antimicrobial activity was determined by Agar-well-diffusion method against 6 bacteria (3 Gram-positive and 3 Gram-negative), 2 yeasts and 3 fungi. Neroli oil exhibited a marked antibacterial activity especially against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, Neroli oil exhibited a very strong antifungal activity compared with the standard antibiotic (Nystatin), as evidenced by their inhibition zones. Antioxidant activity determined by ABTS assay showed IC50 values of 672 mg/L. Finally, our study may be considered as the first report on the biological properties of this essential oil. We hope that our results will provide a starting point for the investigations to exploit new natural substances present in the essential oil of C. aurantium L. flowers.
... The results also showed that this methodology is applicable to assess purity. (Ammar et al., 2012;Azanchi et al., 2014;Boussaada and Chemli, 2006 ...
... Neroli EO is nowadays an iconic product in the fragrance industry, due to its olfactive profile (Floral, orange blossom, green, methyl-like, and honeyed) in demand in the perfume industry (Berger, 2007). Many biological studies have reported neurotonic properties (Duval, 2012) and antimicrobial, antioxidant (Ammar et al., 2012;Dosoky and Setzer, 2018;Hsouna et al., 2013;Sarrou et al., 2013), anticonvulsant (Azanchi et al., 2014), analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities (Khodabakhsh et al., 2015) for this EO. Currently, this EO (C. ...
... Neroli and petitgrain EOs are mainly composed of monoterpenic hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenoids. The principal 167 Chapitre 4 : Empreintes isotopiques et énantiomériques des huiles essentielles : application à l'huile essentielle de néroli components of neroli and petitgrain EOs are linalool, limonene, linalyl acetate, β-pinene, (E) βocimene, (E)-nerolidol, (E) (E) farnesol, and α-terpineol (Ammar et al., 2012;Azanchi et al., 2014;Boussaada and Chemli, 2006 and held for 10 min. Enantiomeric ratios were determined for α-thujene, α-pinene, camphene, sabinene, β-pinene, α-phellandrene, δ-3-carene, limonene, and β-phellandrene, as reported in Figure 1a. ...
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Les matières naturelles aromatiques, telles que les huiles essentielles, que l’on retrouve sur le marché, ne sont pas toujours authentiques, bien que ces produits soient vendus comme étant 100% purs et naturels. Certains fournisseurs fraudent leurs produits afin de réduire les coûts de production, d’améliorer la qualité des huiles essentielles ou encore pour augmenter artificiellement les volumes de production. Les huiles essentielles sont adultérées en ajoutant des produits à moindre coût, incluant des matières naturelles moins chères et des molécules d’origine pétrochimique. Des méthodes d’authentification appropriées sont nécessaires pour contrôler la naturalité et la pureté des huiles essentielles. La détermination des ratios isotopiques stables et l’analyse énantiosélective de composés spécifiques, associées à la recherche de traces de précurseurs de synthèses, permettent d’authentifier de nombreuses huiles essentielles (gaulthérie, alliacées, néroli, menthe crépue, cannelle et cypriol). Le contrôle de ces produits naturels requiert l’établissement de banques de données, constituées d’échantillons parfaitement tracés pour l’authenticité de leurs origines. La méthodologie mise en place a permis de développer de nouveaux outils pertinents pour l’authentification, comprenant le développement de l’analyse isotopique de composés ciblés pour la mesure du δ18O et du δ34S, et d’identifier de nouvelles fraudes, comprenant les ajouts de composés enrichis en 14C et les molécules issues d’hémisynthèses.
... Neroli oil is extracted from the Citrus aurantium L. blossoms, commonly named bitter orange, which is a tree belonging to the Rutaceae family. It has antimicrobial and antioxidant properties [21], and has been shown to possess active constituents that play a significant role against inflammation, thus resulting useful for pain management [22]. Other therapeutic properties include sedative, calming, tonic, cytophylactic, aphrodisiac, anti-depressant, and antispasmodic action [23]. ...
... Originally employed as a cardiac stimulant, for carminative purposes, and to help babies fall asleep, this water has been suggested to be useful in detoxification programs or when quitting addiction habits such as smoking [23]. Besides the aromatic water, the distillation of sour orange flowers produces neroli, a rare aromatic oil that contains a fragrance and represents the core of one of the world's most used perfumes, "eau de cologne," which is also used in pharmacy as a flavoring agent [21], as well as in some medicines approved by the American Food and Drug Administration. ...
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Childbirth is a stressful and physically painful event in a woman’s life and aromatherapy is one of the most used non-pharmacological methods that is effective in reducing anxiety and perceived pain. This randomized controlled study aimed at determining the effect of neroli oil aromatherapy on anxiety and pain intensity perception in 88 women during labor, randomly assigned to either an intervention group (n = 44) or control group (n = 44). Anxiety and perceived pain were assessed through the visual analogue scale during the latent, early, and late active phases of labor. Data analyses included the t-test, Chi-square test, and repeated measures ANOVA. Perceived pain and anxiety in the group receiving aromatherapy were significantly lower than in the control group at all stages of labor (p < 0.05). Specifically, as the labor progressed, pain and anxiety increased in all participants, but the increase was milder in the experimental group than in the control group. The multiparas showed higher average anxiety scores, but not perceived pain, than the primiparas in all phases of labor (p < 0.05). Ultimately, neroli oil aromatherapy during labor can be used as an alternative tool to relieve anxiety and perceived pain in women during all stages of labor.
... High concentrations of oxygenated hydrocarbons in C. lemon and C. aurantifolia could be attributed to the strong antifungal activities of these oils [21]. They could synergistically increase the effect of limonene and other monoterpene hydrocarbons [22]. ...
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... Hydrodistillation is used to extract essential oils and bioactive compounds from C. aurantium flowers [70][71][72][73][74], peels [12,40,75], and leaves [28]. ...
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