Article

Image-guided Percutaneous Core Needle Biopsy of Musculoskeletal Tumors in Children

*Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology ‡Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology §Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology Departments of †Radiology ∥Pathology ¶Orthopedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles CA.
Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (Impact Factor: 0.9). 04/2013; 36(5). DOI: 10.1097/MPH.0b013e3182880de0
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The use of image-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (PCNB) to obtain tissue diagnosis of musculoskeletal lesions has become the standard of care in adult patients with a success rate of over 80%. Previous reports indicate a similar success rate in diagnosing pediatric solid tumors. In this large study, we analyzed >10 years of data in which PCNB was used for tissue diagnosis of musculoskeletal lesions in children; we evaluated the histopathologic accuracy, anesthetic requirements, and complications of these procedures. In 122 children, tissue diagnosis was successfully obtained in 82% of cases, and there were 0 complications associated with the procedure. There was a significantly higher PCNB diagnostic success rate in malignant lesions (93%). These data suggest that the use of PCNB is a safe and effective means of diagnosing musculoskeletal lesions in children.

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    ABSTRACT: The use of image-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (PCNB) to obtain tissue diagnosis of musculoskeletal lesions has become the standard of care in adult patients with a success rate of over 80%. Previous reports indicate a similar success rate in diagnosing pediatric solid tumors. In this large study, we analyzed >10 years of data in which PCNB was used for tissue diagnosis of musculoskeletal lesions in children; we evaluated the histopathologic accuracy, anesthetic requirements, and complications of these procedures. In 122 children, tissue diagnosis was successfully obtained in 82% of cases, and there were 0 complications associated with the procedure. There was a significantly higher PCNB diagnostic success rate in malignant lesions (93%). These data suggest that the use of PCNB is a safe and effective means of diagnosing musculoskeletal lesions in children.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2013 · Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

  • No preview · Article · May 2014 · Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Image-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (PCNB) of soft-tissue lesions is a minimally invasive technique that can provide a definitive diagnosis for treatment. Anatomical and age considerations in children require judicious use of safe percutaneous biopsy techniques. There are, however, limited data on the determinants of diagnostic yield in soft-tissue lesions in this population. To assess lesion-related and technical factors that affect diagnostic yield and safety in PCNB of pediatric soft-tissue lesions. This was a retrospective cohort study of 205 PCNB performed from January 2000 to July 2014. Diagnostic yield and its associations with technical and lesion-related factors were evaluated using bivariate analysis. The mean patient age was 11.1 ± 6.9 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 4.3-16 years). Ultrasound guidance alone was used in 91% of cases. The mean number of passes was 7.5 ± 3.2 (IQR: 5-9 passes) per case. The overall diagnostic yield was 75% and the overall accuracy was 88%. Performing fewer than four passes was associated with a nondiagnostic biopsy (P = 0.001). There were no lesion or other technical factors that predicted a diagnostic biopsy. There were two complications (1%) over 14 years. Image-guided PCNB is a safe and effective means for the diagnosis of pediatric soft-tissue abnormalities. Aside from performing at least four passes, our data show no technical or lesion-related factors that increase diagnostic yield in pediatric PCNB of soft-tissue lesions.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Pediatric Radiology