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A Virtual Project Approach To ODL Courses

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The development and delivery of an Open Distance Learning (ODL) course comprises of many stages and many key stakeholders. Coordinated by an academic course coordinator, an ODL course has a number of parallels with a virtual project managed using electronic mediums and without much face-to-face interaction amongst the team members who collaborate from different demographics and have different expertise. Faced with similar challenges to managing a virtual project, the development and delivery of an ODL course can also be approached as a virtual project using project management techniques practiced in other industries. A survey was conducted among a selected cohort of course coordinators, course writers and tutors at Wawasan Open University (WOU) to identify (i) the success rate of ODL courses managed virtually from the perspective of project managers (course coordinators) and project team members (course writers and tutors) and (ii) the key factors governing the productivity and success of ODL courses managed virtually. This paper identifies some of the key factors which contribute to the productivity and success of an ODL course which is managed using a virtual project management approach.
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